3.0? 3.5? 4.0?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Natsus, Aug 26, 2004.

  1. Natsus

    Natsus New User

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    I see lots of tennis ratings on the board but have no idea what they mean. I seem to recall slightly of these levels back in the day when I played in USTA, but I can't remember what they mean. So I ask...

    What's a 3.0 level? 3.5? 4.0?
     
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  2. Thanatos

    Thanatos Semi-Pro

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    #2
  3. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    1.0 beginner who doesn't know any rules
    2.0 beginner who understands many of the rules
    2.5 junior high level (very weak backhand)
    3.0 JV level (rallies at slow pace)
    3.5 high school
    4.0 small college
    4.5 college
    5.0 university
    6.0 semi-pro
    7.0 pro
     
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  4. Natsus

    Natsus New User

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    thanks!
     
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  5. goober

    goober Legend

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    I would use the actual rating systems in the link given by Thanatos.

    The rating system based on school level doesn't make any sense to me. There are many high school players that are in the 4.0-5.5 range.
     
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  6. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    I am talking the typical high school player on a team. If a high school player was 5.0 level then they would probably have a tennis scholarship to a university or end up play college level tennis if they were 4.0 or above already.
     
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  7. Tennis Guy

    Tennis Guy Semi-Pro

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  8. Natsus

    Natsus New User

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    true. I was looking for general levels so that I know how good you guys are when you're describing your matches. I had an impression before that 4.0s are extremely good and 3.0s are average. Good to know now that I'm not that bad =P.

    The USTA rankings are very informative. Thanks.
     
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  9. goober

    goober Legend

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    The problem is unless you have seen a lot of high school players from different schools it is very difficult to say what a typical high school player is like. At the high school I went to I really doubt that the average player was a 3.5. Almost all the kids on the team were playing since they were 5 or 6 and the average level I would say was a 4.5. That is why a rating system based on skill set makes more sense to me.
     
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  10. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    sure, some powerhouse high schools are going to have 4.5s and maybe even some 5.0s. I see too many 3.5 level kids thinking they are 4.5 or 5.0 while only competing against other high school kids and not playing adults with actual 3.5, 4.0, or 4.5 ratings. We all like to think highly of ourselves if we can and even more so the younger we are.

    Guys that go to state around here are 4.0 level and guys who win state are 4.5s. But this is not a hotbed of tennis either, unfortunately. Football and basketball are the sports that rule.
     
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  11. Natsus

    Natsus New User

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    It does happen though. My highschool used to be great in tennis. We had a player named Oliver Choo. He was most certainly a 4.5, or even a 5.0

    In his Highschool career he, was county champion for all 4 years, and was state semi-finalist in NJ 3 times.

    He went on to play for Harvard. I think he was the captain, but I'm not sure as it doesn't say on the Harvard website. He was playing 1st doubles as far as I can tell.

    Point is, yes it does happen. Kids do tend to over state they're abilities. When I was a kid, I thought I was a 4.0 and lost in a 4.0 tourny, 6-0 6-1 in the first round :oops:
     
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  12. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Even with the ratings..

    I think those ratings are still kind of vague. I intend to enter some low level tournament and see how I do. That's got to be the best way to rate yourself IMHO.

    Pete
     
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  13. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, just enter a 3.5 level tournament and if you lose badly in the first round, you might consider yourself 3.0, if you are competitive then keep playing 3.5s and if you win the tournament, jump up and play 4.0 in the next one. That's a good way to start.
     
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  14. Skinny Dip

    Skinny Dip New User

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    I would say if have decent results (above average) in a 3.5 level tournament you're probably a 4.0 since everyone plays down a level in tournaments.
     
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  15. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Yes, often the winner of 3.5 doesn't look much different than the winner of the 4.0 and 4.5 tournaments. I never won a 3.5 tournament always losing to the eventual champion and just started playing 4.0 in tournaments 3 years ago where initially I lost but now I also often lose to the eventual champion again. I would say the top 4.0s in tournaments are probably 4.5 but they don't hit at 4.5 level pace or have huge serves but do have 4.5 level consistency on all their shots.
     
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  16. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Interesting how there is a difference between college and university - is this because that one is supose to be larger/better than the other? Actually, the strict difference (college vs university) is in the degree(s) awarded - but even that distinction has diminished over the years. In other words many colleges now offer a variety of degree programs at the undergraduate level - BA, BS, etc.

    There are somewhere in the neigherhood of 3300 colleges and universities in the US. As a general rule, universities are larger and many schools that were once colleges have become universities as they started offering more than just one degree at the undergraduate level.

    There would be a difference perhaps in what division (1, 1AA, 2, 3, etc.)the college or university was in for a particular sport. However, one school might compete in division 1 in one sport and in division 3 in another - really doesn't have anything to do with size.
     
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