4 Performance Factors

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Ash_Smith, Apr 11, 2014.

  1. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

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    ^^^ Your loss Guy :D

    Are you technically minded in your general life?

    I am and have therefore been a very technical coach for many, many years (I still have a love of biomechanics), but the more I work at an elite level, the more I realise it isn't just about hitting balls, the psychosocial aspect has a major bearing on performance at an elite level and mental toughness is the defining factor in the majority of cases.

    All the performance factors, are of course, intrinsically linked, and all need to be coached/trained to whatever extent the athlete and their team feel necessary. My interest in this thread is to see where the residents of TT place their importance - with the proliferation of hi-speed infographics that often populate threads I shouldn't be surprised that the majority think technically, whilst those that have coached to a high level (5263, TCF, Me etc) are putting mental toughness top of the tree.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2014
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  2. psv255

    psv255 Professional

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    Based on the original premise of the thread (Building the ideal tennis player)

    Tac: 20
    Phys: 50
    Tec: 70
    Men: 60

    Almost equal high merit to technique and mental aspect, as one enables the other and does not break down easily. Physical @ 60. Imo tactics are also enabled by technique to great extent, and the high mental rating would also help manage tactics in pressure situations, which at high levels often involve very basic but well-worked patterns.
     
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  3. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    The majority of the techniques out there are not the top notch stuff. Because the best techniques need to be incorporated with psychology to further the development at some point. If you assume technique as whatever is out there mostly you can discredit a bit but that's due to the assumption. Some people perceive technique differently than others. Even in these kind of simple exercise definitions are important. Otherwise you can interpret whatever way you want and there can be no consensus nor any reasonable conclusion.
     
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  4. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Raj, clubs today are filled with players older than you. They are the ones with the time and money to devote to tennis, and not many other worries in their head. Think of your tennis career as just beginning.

    I don't see why physical training will do you any harm. Yoga is always there, but other than that I am sure there are many exercises you can do. You already seem to have your weight under control, so that is a big achievement right there.
     
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  5. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I am sure he is OK in real life.

    He probably collects material like this to present at LTA conferences and seminars. Tennis bodies seem to be highly bureaucratic and structured, and fond of organizing all kinds of meetings which are essentially partying and networking opportunities. I read a lot of tennis magazines so I know about this. Topics like "4 performance factors" will be huge hits regardless of their validity because they sound scientific and can be discussed, and all answers will be proclaimed to be useful (C'mon guys, speak up, there are no wrong answers, will be the rallying call to the crowd already under the influence of a couple of beers). I have attended so many of these (though not in tennis) that I know how all this works. I think the last one I attended put up 3 bullets about Clarity, Commitment, Confidence and started the "discussion."
     
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  6. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

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    ^^^ Haha - believe me, if I were presenting at a conference, the last place I would come to collect material would be here!
     
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  7. RajS

    RajS Rookie

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    Thank you for the encouragement and kind words, Suresh. It is actually a great thing to always view oneself as beginning a new phase, and be a work in progress. When I sent my kids to Gandhi camp (organized by the Indian community here), I met a really enlightened gentleman from India in his eighties, who, among other things, told the kids to start every day by saying, "This is the first day of the rest of my life." I don't know how it affected the kids, but man, I think about it every day!

    I agree with you about yoga. I have incorporated yoga into my stretching, which I do for 20 to 30 minutes most days. I try to avoid impact oriented training as much as I can, by restricting it to once or twice a week (mainly running). Tennis itself, if played properly, is training enough these days!
     
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  8. RoddickAce

    RoddickAce Hall of Fame

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    For pros or rec players I would pick:

    Tec: 100
    Phys: 60
    Mental: 30
    Tac:10

    If I had a 160mph serve, 100mph groundstrokes that are consistent and well placed, consistent deep returns, and edberg's volleys... with 60 physicality, so I can get to most shots, I won't have to worry about getting in tight spots since I will win most points anyway. Regarding tactics, I'll just hit left and right over and over again.
     
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  9. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    That's because elite players don't have technical flaws. Have you seen that video? He explains it better then me..

    Most players love to blame their 'mental' side when they don't really have any game at all. If you are misjudging the ball - missing the sweet spot and then using inferior stroke mechanics your tactics, mental game and the rest aren't coming into play.

    Even at the elite level I have my doubts. Is Federer technically superior on his strokes or just the smarter mental player. In the past the answer was BOTH.
     
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  10. maleyoyo

    maleyoyo Rookie

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    I read somewhere that elite sports performance is about 80% mental, but my realistic view for tennis would be:
    Men: 120
    Tech: 40
    Phys: 25
    Tac: 15
     
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  11. EP1998

    EP1998 Semi-Pro

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    I get what you're trying to say but the elite level of technique can't even be developed without mental toughness.
     
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  12. tommyfr

    tommyfr Rookie

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    Whereas Ash often have good points and insights, one of the best posters here we think, he has a tendency for me knows best.

    So I really dont know the purpose of his post this time.

    Anyway, let me add a couple of things maybe not mentioned yet:

    point 1: Most top pro players, all with NTRP skill level 7.0, use concepts for success (or bad day) such as Rhythm, Feel, Confidence. The same with coaches from the spanish school, as Ash for sure knows about. And these concepts are a combination of technical skill sets, physical and mental factors. So the distinction Ment-Phys, Tec, Tac seems to me a bit oldfashioned and artificial.

    Second and nevertheless, the main difference of top players, players that at a time achieved supreme technical mastery (maybe > 1 % of the tennis population), vs all others (est ten millions of tennis players) hackers, beginners, intermediate in the world, despite playing maybe for decades, many times a the week IS TECHNICAL.

    Take a 50 + years old ex ATP player and let him meet a young fighter with whatever 3.0 level, even let him practice fulltime for a year, with all the sport psychologists help possible, he might reach level 4.0.....still a piece of cake for the ex pro. Because his technical level, even if he did not hold a racket for many years, is still so much better.

    So in short: if you want to BUILD a player that can beat 99 % of all the tennis players in the world, focus on developing the persons TECHNICAL skills to Mastery. Then you have a player on a different planet.

    Or as Robert Landsdorp (who dont focus much on mental training) said: if you go to a battle, the opponent with wooden sticks, and you with a cannon, normally you come with a lot of more confidence.

    But if you have two juniors on SIMILAR LEVEL, or two middle aged hackers 4.0 players, or two ATP/WTA players, the one with stronger mental skills (concentration, handling stress, will to win, or rhytm, feel, confidence, etc) will most often come out on top. But thats another issue.

    Of course, a requirement for learning tennis mastery requires Motivation, and that could be inserted in the Mental category and then all is mental by definition. But was that the purpose or meaning with the question?
     
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  13. winstonlim8

    winstonlim8 Semi-Pro

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    Tec: 30
    Tac:40
    Phys:60
    Men: 70

    I am looking at Ash's point distribution as what I feel I should and could improve on (and the emphasis on each performance factor) to play better.

    Since I play singles mostly against much younger men most of the time, while my old moldie techniques and simple strategies have held up well for the most part, I'd have to go with this to get to 4.0. I can't speak for the pros or anyone else, I'm afraid.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2014
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  14. tennis_balla

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    This isn't just for the juniors. Watch any WTA match and its appalling how some of these matches are played. Player wins first set 6-2, loses second set 6-0. How this can happen at such a high professional level to me is just shocking. Its a trend, and it isn't once in a while. I see it all the time. Its like half the tour are a bunch of mental midgets.

    I've been watching a few WTA matches recently on tv and wait for the changeovers when the coaches come out and give their players some tips. They have the camera and microphone right there and no commercial break so you get to hear it all mostly. Wozi's dad blabs away like a crazy person, others talk a lot as well. I heard one coach tell his player about 5 or 6 different tips. The players just sit there, doesn't even look like they're paying much attention, in a daze. Lights are on, no ones home.
     
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  15. Dags

    Dags Professional

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    At what level are you applying this? At an elite level, where technique is flawless, tactics have been engrained from an early age and physical training has long been accepted, it won't come as a surprise to many that the mental game is where you can derive an edge.

    If you were back working with club hackers who have clear technical flaws and no real concept of tactics other than to keep the ball in play, would you still prioritise the mental game? And if so, can you give some ideas of what you might teach?

    Speaking personally, a lot of the mental side comes from confidence, and for me, I have confidence if my technique is holding up. From that perspective, I would have to place a higher weighting on technique than mental. I may have it all backwards though (hence still being a club hacker :)), which is why I'd be interested to hear how you would approach things with the recreational player.
     
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  16. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    The truth is much more complex. Some coaches talk a lot during the changeover while the student just listens. Some hardly say anything but a few words of encouragement. Some give a few technical tips. It is a mixed bag. Sometimes the student puts a towel over her head or focuses on her drink. It does not mean that she is not paying attention.

    In fact, there was a tennis writer who said he opposed coaching just for this reason. He said it gives chauvinistic males who have never played at a professional level a golden opportunity to make condescending stupid comments, and showcases the women as dumb objects being patronized by a male. The woman might just be trying to focus and prefer not to head-nod to every phrase from her coach, but a guy who has never played close to any kind of pro tennis of will say that there is nobody home, as if he is psychologist too.

    Mental issues may be an issue in a bagel rout, but a big difference between the ATP and the WTA is the serve. In the WTA, it is possible for one player to break the opponent's serve continuously and bagel her. In the ATP, even a lowly-ranked player can make life tough on the serve. This alone probably prevents many bagel fests.

    If I wanted a good example of a mental breakdown happening repeatedly and predictably, I would go with Federer vs Nadal.
     
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  17. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I am sure he is a great guy in real life, always trying to improve himself.
     
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  18. tennis_balla

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    You're on a roll, don't stop.
     
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  19. rkelley

    rkelley Hall of Fame

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    If a player is mentally checking out I don't know how much help a bunch of technical tips are going to be. Being mentally in a match is a state of mind, it's not about strokes. Occasionally there are tactical things that a coach could tell a player (Jim, move back on the return of serve. OK José.)

    Overall I gotta say that I hate the coaching thing at change overs in the WTA. Part of tennis, a big part, is the mental aspect. If you can get someone mentally off the rails with how you play them then good on you. Having a coach come in and try to right the ship fundamentally changes the game.

    And as a player, in that journey to become mentally tougher, you learn things about yourself.
     
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  20. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    Nah you got my scales wrong, I'm comparing apples to apples, not apples to pears...

    Basically the technique (and other factors) for pros are way superior (like yourself stated) to the rec players.

    Take chess as an example the ratings for amateurs are 0-1400 ELO, while masters start at over 2200 ELO.

    So basically if I'm a pro, what would make a difference? I say the mental factor, b/c most of pros already have great technique...
    So I'd be working on my mental aspect etc.

    On the other hand as a rec player, I'd be focusing on my (or lack there of) technique...
     
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  21. TCF

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    Funny thing with girls is how closely top level juniors, even 12s-14s, and WTA can seem to correlate. The boys you have no clue until later on as their styles are constantly evolving. But seems like these girls start competing early with a certain style and holes in the serve or holes in the mental game and never change all that much, right up through college and pros.
     
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  22. ramos

    ramos New User

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    The brain controls the body

    The brain is our main weapon! And should control the body, not the inverse!
    So...
    Men first...!
    The other elements are correlated, in my opinion!
     
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  23. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    There is a fallacy here. The functioning of the brain is closely related to the body. The sense organs in a very real way shape the brain. That is what used to be called "muscle memory" in the past.
     
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  24. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    It's actually probability. In the WTA, the players don't have big serves, so in some cases, they hold as often as they break. If two players are equally good and have a 50% probability of holding serve, a bagel set will occur 3.125% of the time. On the men's tour, hold percentages are much higher, around 75%, meaning that a bagel set will occur only 1.318% of the time. Breadsticks and 6-2 sets are also much more likely when neither player has a big serve.
     
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  25. tennis_balla

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    I have noticed this as well. Really key to establish proper fundamentals early on because after that its probably too late.
     
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  26. tennis_balla

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    Ok, but that doesn't really explain the fact that player A wins first set 6-1 and loses second 6-0 for example. To me that shows someone who isn't mentally tough.
     
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  27. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

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    That's an interesting statement sureshs - can you elaborate?
     
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  28. Ballinbob

    Ballinbob Hall of Fame

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    How does one become mentally strong under pressure? I'm so bad under pressure it's ridiculous. I was serving for the set at 5-4 up in a 4.0 tournament a few days ago and hit 2 doubles and shanked two easy forehands. Lost the set 7-5. This happens all the time with me, and I have a lot of match experience too. I play tournaments and competitive matches all the time yet I still can't preform well under pressure.

    Maybe I need to see a sports psychologist lol...it's frustrating
     
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  29. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

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    Bob, it's a tough one to dissect in a thread but...

    The first thing thing is to understand why we make bad decisions when under stress. We can assume that when in situations of stress (read danger), the primitive part of the brain (the amygdala) receives the signal and essentially creates a fight, flight or freeze response to the danger. The problem is that the amygdala cannot determine levels of danger, only that danger is present and therefore something bad will definitely happen, which was fine for animals, for example, as they either fought, froze until the danger went away or ran away themselves.

    However, this is where the problem for humans occurs - we are very bad fighters in many situations, so we freeze (choke) or want to run away (panic) In order to facilitate this fight, flight, freeze response a signal is sent to release a boat load of adrenaline into the system. This adrenaline rush allows muscle to perform way above its normal capacity, but has a very unfortunate impact on cognition.

    When the heart rate is raised by adrenaline to around 130bpm, we have an impaired cognitive function to the tune of 70% (we have only 30% of our usual cognitive processing to work with).
    When the heart rate is adrenalised to around 170bpm, our cognition is impaired down to only 3% capacity - known as mind blindness!

    This is why human beings often make terrible decisions when under stress.

    We can overcome this by programming the brain with information which helps us rationalise the danger, developing understanding and coping mechanisms - which is where you basically sports psychologists helping athletes perform under pressure. This is best done through experiential learning (that is, being in the situation, but in a "safe" environment) and through learning the aforementioned coping strategies, which may include things like breathing techniques, "stop thinking", reframing and routines and rituals and applying them in the "safe" practice situation.

    Hope that makes sense (and helps a little)
     
    #79
  30. maleyoyo

    maleyoyo Rookie

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    You are not alone!
    Many kids as young as 12 or 13 in high performance sports program do see a sports psychologist to work on the mental aspect of their game.
     
    #80
  31. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    Oddly just watched a final of this match up of a cannon vs wooden sticks this morning in jr 16s. One big athletic kid who played all his life with trained strokes and a booming serve vs another athletic kid who took up the game later, but was good at retrieving. The obviously higher trained kid lost the 1st set badly with his normal ripping strokes, that worked well, but came back just often enough to un-nerve the more skilled player's confidence and challenged his shot tolerance. 2ond set the skilled player shifted gears, and despite the nerves and long rallys, gutted out a tight set victory, but the 3rd set went to the wooden stick as the cannon seemed to be low on power....
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2014
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  32. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Apparently all the training or his life hasn't been long enough. IMO, if a match is won by defending and retrieving, it's pretty low level!

    Another thing I observe is for regularly competing players, 3 sets are never exhausting to them. Strange that junior fitness can't handle 3 sets.
     
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  33. TCF

    TCF Hall of Fame

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    By the finals you can not say that. Geez, we just had kids play 2 long tiebreakers on a Saturday, one at 8 am then the 2nd at 5 pm, not getting off the court until 7 pm. Then Sunday a match at 8 am that went 7-5, 7-6, a match at noon, then a tiebreaker in the finals......on Har Tru.....hot and humid.

    Its pretty common for players to be almost dead by the finals. Junior tournaments are notorious for schedules sometimes making kids play an insane amount of high level tennis over the course of a weekend.
     
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  34. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Drinkers can think in terms of proof. 40% = 80 proof.

    Ash, perhaps I missed it. Have these performance factors been defined? the terms, for me, are a bit nebulous. Can be quite a bit of overlap for these concepts/factors.
     
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  35. BIGJ98

    BIGJ98 Rookie

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    One way I deal with pressure when I am playing for my hs team is I just try to play high % tennis. So in your situation maybe just spin your serve in and play loopy groundstrokes to put pressure on the other guy. Also it helps to focus on the ball and just swing.
     
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  36. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Maybe. But without some level of technique mental toughness is meaningless. You can be the toughest dude in the world - capable of playing 10 world class chess matches at the same time..

    But if you can't hit the ball where you want on the court - or you shank every third ball into the net its not going to matter. OTOH if you have rock solid strokes its pretty easy to play tough. You know each and every time your stroke is going to 'come through' for you.

    The big issue is that the technique and the physical stuff - that's the stuff that's hard to get. If you are a world class athlete with top technique you can develop the mental toughness..

    I was playing a friend of mine today. His groundstrokes were totally off and he just crumbled. It's easy to place the blame on 'mental toughness' when this happens but more often then not - its ****** technique.

    When you shank a ball into the net - most of the time you are just doing something wrong. Once in a blue moon you see a pro play a stupid shot - go for too much or try a drop shot at the wrong time - a mental mistake. But technique - its a huge problem all the time - especially for rec players.
     
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  37. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    So when Nadal wins a match by defending and retrieving, he's playing low level tennis?

    And 3 sets can be very exhausting if the rallies are long and physical. They can also be barely tiring at all if the points go quickly. Juniors often grind more because grinding is often the best strategy.
     
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  38. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    The way the brain was explained was that it was a little computer inside the body. The impression given was that it did some calculations on input and spit out some output. However, it was not clarified that the brain is not like a computer chip in a very important respect. A computer CPU remains the same whether you plug anything to the USB interfaces or not. But the brain and resultant consciousness is shaped by the sensory experiences. It is now speculated that there is no such thing as a hidden center of consciousness. Being human is part of the consciousness of a human. The awareness of where the body ends, how it moves, and so forth, are part of the brain experience. A human can never understand a bear's consciousness. But you can take out the chip from one motherboard and plug it into another. Not for the brain. The circuits it sets up (which are real physical changes) are the result of perceptions from the rest of the body.
     
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  39. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Technical has to be highest. The guy who can hit the ball harder, more accurately, and more consistently will usually win.
    Physical has to be pretty high. Speed around the court to defend and ability to set up for shots for offense is important, but you don't have to be a physical specimen. McEnroe was quick, and Laver was extremely fit and quick, but not physically overpowering.
    Mental strength is important, as well as tactics, but only if the players are pretty evenly matched to begin with.

    So:
    I have:
    technical at 80
    Physical at 60
    Tactical at 35
    Mental at 25

    I've turned a 50,50,50,50 Challenger player into someone like Monfils.
     
    #89
  40. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Yup that is the obvious answer. Many ATP players avoid bagels by just serving up a few aces in one game.

    No need to insult WTA players as "mental midgets."

    The qualified high-level coaches who are actually sought out by them don't stoop to such levels.
     
    #90
  41. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Defending and retrieving is only one aspect of his game.
     
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  42. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    Of course. But look at user's quote: "IMO, if a match is won by defending and retrieving, it's pretty low level!" It just doesn't work.
     
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  43. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I think what he meant was that at low levels, defending and retrieving are more common.
     
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  44. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I have read this in various contexts and have no doubt it is true.

    However, I have to ask "in comparison to what?" A low-stress situation? Of course. If there is no immediate fear, we can think clearly, take our time to weigh the pros and cons, and come up with a good decision. How are we supposed to do it in a desperate situation (in real life)? So the comparison seems unfair.

    The reason I mentioned "real life" is that it is possible to train oneself to make good decisions under stress in "play" situations. I have heard that race car drivers can control the car as it is skidding or toppling over and their brain is still in control. Nadal chasing down a ball has trained himself to get to it and put it back in the most inconvenient place for his opponent. But these are situations either of no real threat or a planned-for threat. What about a real unplanned strange threat?
     
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  45. tommyfr

    tommyfr Rookie

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    When Landsdorp referred to "cannon" he did not refer to a 4.5 level or so jr. He referred to the fact that he didnt put much emphasis on mental training when coaching Sharapova or Lindsey Davenport, Tracy Austin, Pete Sampras, and many more. He focussed on developing Superior technique. Mastery. Then you come to compete with a good level of confidence, concentration.

    I happen to be a tennis coach and sport psychologist as well, and I believe the mental part is very important. Sure. I have seen hundreds of junior matches and it happens now and then that the technically weaker player wins, but that was not the point. When two player on similar level competes the mental part is often decisive.

    But again, to build an ideal player, such a player who can beat 99% of the tennis population, you need to focus the majority of the work on technique.

    And as Rick Macci says: "good fundamentals lasts a lifetime, and unfortunately, so does bad fundamentals"
     
    #95
  46. tennis_balla

    tennis_balla Hall of Fame

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    Has Nadal, Federer, Djokovic stayed on top for so long because of technique, or because of mental toughness? or a Challenger player grinding it out on the lower circuit for 3 years before finally making it into the top 50? Explain your answer.
     
    #96
  47. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Combination of mental toughness, athleticism, and a bit of luck.
     
    #97
  48. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    With Ash's breakdown - I put timing and feel into technique - so its way ahead of any other factor. I think all the top pros have better technique then the low level tour guys.

    It might be tempting to put timing and feel into 'mental' but lets be honest its pretty unconscious. Rec tennis players are generally a nerdy brainy bunch so they like to boost up the 'mental' side of the game more then it deserves.

    I was playing my friend and he was shanking like every third ball into the net - it was an easy victory for me. Was it great mental toughness.. Not really - it was just some bad technique on the part of my opponent.

    You do see some pros take too many risks and play a poor mental game but if you really study the game you will see this is uncommon. The guys who lose to Federer just aren't as good 'technically'. They don't hit the sweet spot as much - they don't have the timing - they don't have the touch.

    I remember Agassi - what they said was that he was the greatest ball striker they have ever seen. That's all technique. He can hit off the rise better then almost anyone. When Agassi was a little kid he once hustled Jim Brown out of some serious money..I suppose a 9 year old Agassi had better mental toughness then Jim Brown eh?

    Near the end of his career he started playing smarter tennis - but he won championships with sometimes 'dumb' shot selection and great technique. He certainly didn't have a better 'mental' game for most of his career. I watched Agassi when he was a kid - he took ridiculous high risk shots - and made them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2014
    #98
  49. GoudX

    GoudX Professional

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    Player A This player would win at lower levels regularly, but would get punished at pro level.
    Technique - 70, great footwork, anticipation and ball striking easily beats the athletic ability of his peers.
    Mental - 70, if you can keep your cool in any situation it will trump fancy tactics
    Physicality - 35, enough to cover the baseline and hit at pro pace, but unable to run down winners and overpower players.
    Tactics - 25, enough to: know not to go for broke all the time, know to aim for the empty space, and know not to feed the opponents weapon.


    Player B This player would pull off the big upsets at pro level but never dominate. Perhaps Safin?
    Technique - 75, hits the ball very cleanly with great power.
    Mental - 20, usually crumbles under pressure
    Physicality - 80, able to crush the ball with awesome pace, which his peers cannot match, and is capable of going the distance.
    Tactics - 25, has a very effective 1-2 punch which is used ad nauseum.

    Player C Wins regularly at pro level but can't pull off the upset. Basically Ferrer:
    Technique - 40, Solid dependable groundstrokes and solid footwork.
    Mental - 50, Keeps to the plan, but struggles against very talented players who can break the rules
    Physicality - 70, able to run down anything all day.
    Tactics - 40, builds points with topspin shots, reactive rather than pro-active.

    Player D Defensive goat candidates (Nadal/Djokovic), break all the rules.
    Technique - 80, Great groundstrokes which break apart opponents.
    Mental - 90, Able to bounce back from ridiculous lows and can easily hold a lead.
    Physicality - 90, able to run down anything all day while blasting powerful winners off of the back foot.
    Tactics - 80, able to disect the opponents games with clever variations on simple easy to execute stratergies.

    Player E Attacking goat candidate (Federer), break all the rules.
    Technique - 100, Insane groundstrokes and serves which dominate for years on tour.
    Mental - 90, regularly wins tournaments without dropping serve.
    Physicality - 80, blasts winners from everywhere and athletic on approaches.
    Tactics - 70, stratergies which are built around exceptional strengths.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2014
    #99
  50. TCF

    TCF Hall of Fame

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    Lansdorp does believe mental is a huge part of it, but thats not his area of expertise. He is a technical guy. All great players have various coaches along the way. Sharapova had daily mental training sessions at IMG. Lansdorp concentrated on the technical while other coaches handled mental and tactical and fitness training.

    NLB, we usually agree but I totally disagree with your last post. Mental is HUGE if the skill levels are close. Whether its high level juniors or pros, the mental makes all the difference as the skills are close.

    Like some said, if you make the perfect technical and physical player they would blow everyone away.....but thats not reality. In real life the skilled players are all fit, have tactics, have technique. Mental is by far the most important attribute to separate the top jrs and pros.
     

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