A chronology of Anthony Wilding’s singles titles (1901-1914)

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by newmark401, Apr 14, 2010.

  1. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    I'll see if I can find the 1910 Scheveningen result.
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    A note on some first names and nationalities:

    J. Capara = José Capara
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    D.M. Hawes = David M. Hawes, an English player
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    Alfred D. Prebble should be Albert D. Prebble.
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    George Ball-Greene was Irish.
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    Josiah Ritchie should be Major Ritchie, Major being his real first name. He wasn't in the army, at least not before World War One, when he would have been in his mid-forties.
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    C.P. Dodge = Charles P. Dodge
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    A.G. Watson was known as Georges Watson (Belgium).
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    If I'm not mistaken A.B. Jones was Alan Jones, an Australian player.
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    Last edited: Jan 26, 2013
    #51
  2. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    The following result has been verified and added:

    [8-14 August] The Hague, Holland (Clay)

    FI: Anthony F. Wilding (NZL) d. Roelof van Lennep 6-0, 6-3, 6-0
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    Thanks to Alex at www.tennisarchives.com
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  3. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    To: "Wolbo":

    In your wikipedia entry on Anthony Wilding you've copied almost all of the results that I and some others found, and which I've included in this thread, but you've given the incorrect sources in your entry in wikipedia. The correct sources are listed in this thread.

    Can you rectify this error in the wikipedia entry you created?

    Mark Ryan
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    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
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  4. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    Tremendous Stuff

    This is tremendous stuff. The following is too much to ask, but I pose it as a question for someone to solve sometime:

    Is at all possible to total the unbeaten clay streak that Wilding had from May 1910 to June 1914. I would imagine that that is the all time record of at least 120 matches?
     
    #54
  5. Wolbo

    Wolbo Rookie

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    Mark,

    It's not an error but simply following Wikipedia policies and guidelines. Encyclopedic content must be verifiable in reliable, published sources and a forum with user-generated content does not qualify as a reliable, published source. That is in no way a judgement on the quality of your Wilding article and result list, which is excellent, but simply Wikipedia policy. Also note that the article and original table with Wilding's singles titles already existed and I merely augmented it with results, opponents, dates, surfaces and some additional tournaments. Not having access to some of the sources you used (“Lawn Tennis and Badminton” and “Der Lawn-Tennis-Sport”) I referenced all results individually using mainly online newspaper archives.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2013
    #55
  6. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    First of all, the pre-existing template for Tony Wilding's results in wikipedia was, if I'm not mistaken, created by timnz, who is a member online here at "talktennis" and who had planned to update the wikipedia entry on Tony Wilding using most of the results I posted. You can check timnz's previous posts within this very thread to verify this.

    Secondly, the published sources I used are as reliable as the sources you quote in the wikipedia article, although not, perhaps, as freely available. Not having access to some of the sources I used, you used most of the results from those same sources, but without mentioning them.

    Thirdly, I don't think wikipedia is a one hundred per cent reliable source and I have never posted anything on it.
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    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013
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  7. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    My role

    I can't take the credit for Wildings wikipedia page. I have made the odd update on it over time though. I am fascinated with Wilding on a number of levels. He cuts such an interesting character, capturing the exotic nature of the time. He was the friend of kings and princes, would travel about Europe turning up at chateaus and castles, as a guest, on his motorbike having travelled for days, fixing his bike on roadsides. I don't know why someone hasn't done a movie portraying him. I, for one, are very grateful for this last round of updates...thanks very much for those responsible.
     
    #57
  8. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    Oh, I thought you were the one who created the template in wikipedia based on the results section within this thread. Anyway, it's not that important. I just had a slight gripe about the non-inclusion of the true sources for the results.
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    A film, or even a documentary, about Wilding's life could certainly be very interesting, especially if it revealed a bit more about his private life than is currently known.
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  9. Carlo Giovanni Colussi

    Carlo Giovanni Colussi Semi-Pro

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    Hello newmark401,

    I made the template of Wilding's titles in Wikipedia as early as 2007 and the main source I used then to publish all Anthony's victories, was the one I indicated at the beginning of the chapter : "Anthony Wilding, A Sporting Life by Len and Shelley Richardson, (2005 Canterbury University Press)". By the way a superb book very detailed with only a few mistakes (sometimes years of events are wrong) while On the Court and Off and Captain Anthony Wilding that I also used then, aren't detailed at all about Wilding's results. And as Wolbo explained the original sources shall be cited in Wikipedia.
    Perhaps it is mentioned elsewhere but Ayres' Lawn Tennis Almanack 1913 credited Wilding the 1910 Italian Riveria Champs at San Remo. This is why I put it in the Wikipedia article 5 years and a half ago but Wolbo found in Idzznew's TennisArchives.com site, http://www.tennisarchives.com/voorloopfiche.php?wedstrijdvoorloopid=1384, that, according to Lawn tennis and badminton, 7/4/1910, the 1910 event had a 6-man draw with Artimus Holmes as the winner and apparently Wilding didn't enter the tourney :
    Round 1
    2 players had byes.
    Holmes, Artimus d. Wills, Ernest S. (6-1 6-2)
    Routledge, H.B. d. Murray, C.W. (6-4 1-6 6-4)
    Semifinals
    Holmes, Artimus d. Turton, M. (6-1 6-3)
    Routledge, H.B. d. Bostwick, A.C. (2-6 6-4 6-2)
    Final
    Holmes, Artimus d. Routledge, H.B. (6-0 6-1 6-0).

    Does anyone else than Idzznew confirm these results which contradict Ayres' assertion ?

    Mark, your contribution to Wikipedia would be a blessing as was Elegos7's when he greatly contributed to the "World number 1 male tennis player rankings" wikipedia article a few years ago.

    P.S. : if the San Remo event took place really in February 1910 as suggested in Tennis Archives
    it is impossible that Wilding entered in it
    because he quit Christchurch, New Zealand, around Feb. 3 or 4, depending on the following "to-morrow" if applied to the edition date or the writing date
    ("Anthony Wilding, the well-known international tennis player, leaves Christchurch to-morrow" from the "Evening Post, Volume LXXIX, Issue 28, 3 February 1910", http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cg...l=search&srpos=159&e=-------10--1----0--&st=1)
    and arrived in South Africa a few weeks later
    and in particular won the South African Champs, in Johannesburg, held during the week of March 28 - April 3, 1910
    so Wilding couldn't be in Italy in February 1910.
    Therefore unless the Italian Riviera Champs dates are wrong, Wilding can't have played (and won) the San Remo event that year.

    Thank you Wolbo for the above link and the following one as well, the latter listing a summary of Wilding's beautiful career : http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cg...28.2.7&cl=&srpos=0&e=-------10--1----0--&st=1
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2013
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  10. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    Hi, Carlo,

    I had a look in "Ayres' Lawn Tennis Almanack" and it has no information on the 1910 edition of the San Remo tournament in its 1911 edition (for the year 1910).

    However, in the "Ayres' LTA" for 1921, in its list of previous winners of the men's singles title in San Remo, it has the following:

    1908 Anthony F. Wilding
    1909 Artimus Holmes
    1910 Artimus Holmes
    1911 Anthony F. Wilding
    1912 Edward R. Allen
    1913 Edward R. Allen
    1914 F. Gordon Lowe

    Mark

     
    #60
  11. Carlo Giovanni Colussi

    Carlo Giovanni Colussi Semi-Pro

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    Hi Mark,

    did you see my questions at the end of your Dohertys' thread, http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=7253841&postcount=32 ?

    Yeah indeed the Ayres' '11 & '12 have no information about the previous Italian Riviera Champions this is why I found only info in the '13 edition but I should have checked, as you, the '21 edition (my book is at home so I will have a look tonight) which updated the apparently wrong 1913 version.
    So it is very likely that Artimus Holmes won the event twice in a row n 1909 and 1910 while Wilding didn't even enter in this tourney. Thank you for your remark.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2013
    #61
  12. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    It appears that Anthony Wilding's last ever loss in a singles match played on clay came at the Wiesbaden tournament in 1910. This tournament was held from May 5-11 and Wilding in fact lost two singles matches there, both to the Frenchman Max Decugis.

    In the final of the Wiesbaden Championships event Decugis beat Wilding 6-4, 7-5, 6-4.

    In the final of the Wiesbaden Cup event Decugis beat Wilding 6-3, 0-6, 6-4, 6-3
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    #62
  13. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    So did these losses happen before these may-10 tournament victories?

    Lille, France over A.G. Watson 6–0, 6–1, 6–0

    Brussels (Leopold Club), Belgium over Max Decugis 6–1, 6–0, 6–2

    Brussels (International Lawn Tennis Singles), Belgium over Max Decugis 6–1, 6–2, 6–0
     
    #63
  14. Wolbo

    Wolbo Rookie

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    I don't know the exact dates for the Lille tournament but the Brussels tournaments were held towards the end of May (source: Dutch newspaper archive) and were therefore after the Wiesbaden losses.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2013
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  15. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    The Brussels international tournament wouldn't have been played before the Wiesbaden tournament.

    The Lille tournament moved up and down the calendar a bit, but the first week or two of May seems too early to me for this particular tournament.

    The Wiesbaden tournament was the main outdoor opening tournament in Germany for many years and therefore attracted a lot of overseas players.
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    #65
  16. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    The 1910 edition of the Lille tournament took place from May 20-22, so after the Wiesbaden tournament.
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    #66
  17. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    Thanks so it looks like we can say the two May -10 Brussels tournaments and the May-10 Lille tournament took place after his May-10 Wiesbaden losses. That makes for 35 straight clay court tournament wins from May-10 to June-14. So we may calculate that:

    If averaging 3 matches per tournament that is 3 x 35 = 105 matches in a row

    If averaging 4 matches per tournament that is 4 x 35 = 140 matches in a row *** this average probably closest to the truth

    If averaging 5 matches per tournament that is 5 x 35 = 175 matches in a row

    No matter what we estimate the average matches Wilding played per tournament, we can see his count is well above Nadal so called record of 80 odd matches in a row on clay.

    (Only question I have - does his withdrawal during a tournament due to injury in 1912 break his run , even though he didn't actually play and lose? - someone have more details on that withdrawal?)
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013
    #67
  18. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    Which tournament do you mean, exactly?
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    #68
  19. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    Wilding injury pullout?

    I read on a link somewhere in this forum....but I just can't seem to find it anywhere that Wilding pulled out of playing a clay court match, I think it was 1912 at the semifinal stage, due to an injury. Important to note this was a Did not play...ie he never started the match. I can't find the forum entry.......
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
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  20. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    I believe that walkover losses do not count on win-loss records nor head-to-heads, but they do snap any winning streaks. This is why Vilas has the open era record of wins in a row, and not Borg.
     
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  21. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    Clay Streak

    Thanks for the info. Well until we have confirmation that Wilding pulled out of a tournament during it...we have to assume he has the Clay Streak record. (My vague memory of seeing someone post something isn't enough to overturn his record).
     
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  22. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    Okay found something - injury in 1912

    In this link from Carlo:

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=4564674&postcount=19

    He mentions an injury causing a WO in 1912 at a tournament in Riviera (amateur) Champs, Menton, Feb 25 - March 2 (?), 1912. That indeed was a clay court tournament. Can anyone comment on that ie confirm if that was the case that he had a W.O.

    It would still make 20 odd straight clay court tournament wins from then until the end of his career.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
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  23. elegos7

    elegos7 New User

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    The link by Carlo mentions he gave a walkover in the first round of the Menton tournament in 1912, which means he has not played at all at that event.
    So it definitely did not snap whatever record he had up to that point.
     
    #73
  24. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    I didn't say that he played. Read what I said again, carefully.

    Had say, Nadal, pulled out of clay-court match in 2006 by giving his opponent a walkover, that's Nadal long clay-court winning streak ended, but it wouldn't count as a loss on his win-loss record nor as a loss in the head-to-head against whoever he gave the walkover to.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2013
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  25. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    What if it is the very first match of a tournament?

    In 2006 was Nadal's pullout later in the tournament ie was it is his first match, or was it in a later round? Does it matter if you haven't played in the tournament at all - as with the case with Wilding. Or is it still considered a streak ending event?
     
    #75
  26. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    It was just an hypothetical scenario. It didn't really happen.

    That's a grey area, I admit.
     
    #76
  27. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    How confident are we about Wildings 1910 2 Brussels tournament wins

    In Wikipedia and other places - it has Wilding beating Max Decugis in the two Brussels tournaments in 1910.

    The normal accepted information is that Wilding won over Decugis at the Royal Leopold Club 6–1, 6–0, 6–2 in the first Brussels tournament and then again later won the International Lawn Tennis Singles (though actually on clay) 6–1, 6–2, 6–0

    However, in this newspaper article it has Max Decugis beating Wilding in the 2nd Brussels meeting:

    http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi...--10--1----0--

    Max Decugis defeated Wilding 3-6, 0-6, 7-5, 6-0, 6-0

    So what is it - was it Wilding over Decugis or the other way around?
     
    #77
  28. Wolbo

    Wolbo Rookie

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    I changed the order of the Territet, Montreux and Sapicourt tournaments in the Wikipedia article. From the available sources it does seem likely that the Sapicourt meeting took place before the Territet tournament in Switzerland (note that the Sapicourt meeting does not count towards Wilding's tournament wins as it was a private meeting). Found an article in a Swiss newspaper archive dated 26 September 1910 mentioning a tournament at the Grand Hotel de Territet but it does not mention Wilding or Germot.
     
    #78
  29. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    Having been beaten by Max Decugis in the final of the two men's singles events in Wiesbaden in the first week of May 1910, Wilding got his revenge a couple of weeks later, thrashing Decugis in the final of the tournament held at the Leopold Club in Brussels.

    In mid-September 1910, in the final of the event held during the World Fair Exhibition in Brussels, Decugis beat Tony Wilding 3-6 0-6, 7-5, 6-0, 6-0 after Wilding had led 6-3, 6-0, 5-4.

    I'll update the results section of this thread in the coming days.

    Mark
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    #79
  30. timnz

    timnz Hall of Fame

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    Break Wildings clay streak?

    Does that september loss break Wildings streak? Was it on clay? Was it just an exo? Or was it an official event?
     
    #80
  31. Mustard

    Mustard Talk Tennis Guru

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    If it does, it was only a few months in anyway.
     
    #81
  32. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    Those Swiss tournaments are very difficult to keep track of. I'll see if I can find anything more specific for the 1910 tournaments, including the one held held in Sapicourt, France.
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    In the results section on the wikipedia page for Anthony Wilding:

    Alfred D. Prebble should be Albert D. Prebble
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    "Hartmann" was Curt von Wessely
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    Josiah Ritchie should always be Major Ritchie
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    A.G. Watson = Georges Watson
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    Last edited: May 28, 2013
    #82
  33. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    Hi, Virginia; I'm in the ******* but have the Wilding autobiography; ran into it at some book sale somehwere, and it's always made me dream of visiting New Zealand. It sounds so nice from Wilding's description.
     
    #83
  34. Wolbo

    Wolbo Rookie

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    According to an article in the Sheffield Evening Telegraph of Thursday 19 March 1903, found in the British Newspaper Archive, the finalist of the Freshmen's Tournament was R.P. Keigwin of Peterhouse.
     
    #84
  35. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    Thanks for that information. I've changed the entry accordingly. Here's a link to the Wikipedia entry on Richard Prescott Keigwin:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R._P._Keigwin
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  36. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    I've added another result above, that of the Carlisle (Cumberland) tournament, held in August 1904. In the final of the men's singles event Tony Wilding defeated the Scottish player George C. Glenny in straight sets. George Crosfield Glenny was the brother of the players John Waterhouse Glenny and Charles James Glenny. Wilding had beaten Charles Glenny in the final of the men's singles event at the Scottish Championships earlier in August 1904 to win his first national singles title.
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  37. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    This is something I found recently when looking up the 1913 WHCC, won by Wilding. There was a report that Wilding had lost to Froitzheim "in the international hard court championship", in Paris, on June 9. That was only 6 days before Wilding won the WHCC which was also commonly referred to as the international hard court championship. I just found that confusing so I made a note of it. I didn't see it mentioned in the thread -- apologies if I missed it somewhere.

    http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&d=TC19130611.2.28.26.2

    The article mentions Froitzheim having beaten Wilding twice "some seasons ago," though no details are given.
     
    #87
  38. Wolbo

    Wolbo Rookie

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    The wiki article had the tournament but with the wrong Glenny. That's now corrected. Thanks.
     
    #88
  39. Wolbo

    Wolbo Rookie

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    That was a first-round match between Froitzheim and Francis (F.S.) Wilding, Anthony's brother. I know very little about his tennis activities but he must have been decent player given this scoreline against the reigning champion.

    Probably the 1907 and 1908 Homburg Cup.
     
    #89
  40. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Thanks, that clears up my confusion -- I didn't even Tony Wilding had a brother.

    He has a page here, with one match listed against Tony -- http://www.tennisarchives.com/player.php?playerid=14768
     
    #90
  41. Wolbo

    Wolbo Rookie

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    Yesterday it exactly 100 years ago that the great Wilding was killed during World War I when a shell landed on his dugout near Neuve-Chapelle in Northern France. The four-time Wimbledon champion was 31.
     
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  42. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

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    Thanks for the reminder.
    --

    Tony Wilding’s Last Day

    From “The Sportsman”, reprinted in “Lawn Tennis and Badminton”, July 6, 1916

    “This is the tale of how Anthony Wilding died. He died in harness after twenty-two hours of splendid work that saved hundreds of lives. Some meagre versions have already been printed, but none of these have been complete or wholly accurate; for the reasons that they have been founded on hearsay, or, as in one instance, handed on by an officer who gained his impression from a talk with Captain Wilding’s chief petty officer.

    “But the splendid fight against overwhelming odds has not been told. Chief Petty Officer S.F. Robbins was at his side the whole time. He has since received the Distinguished Service Cross (D.S.C.) for his part in it. The tale is told in his simple words:

    “‘This was a stunt for which Tony Wilding had been getting ready for more than forty-eight hours before. I found him an officer who left nothing to chance. He was keen to master every trick and turn of the war game. He and I spent most of our time previously in the trench our gun was going to occupy watching the Germans in front of us and spotting the hidden machine guns.

    “‘We were attached to the Lahore Division of the Indian Contingent. General Anderson, who commanded it, planned a general push to break through the German lines near Neuve Chapelle to Lille. Our front line in the trench was 350 yards away from them – in some places only 80. There was barbed wire for thirty yards before the German trench. That was to be broken by our guns first, of course. But the Germans were terribly strong in machine guns. Here we were to come in. We were to shift these by three-pounder fire from the front-line trench. It was a dangerous job, and no one knew better the chances he was taking than Captain Wilding.

    “‘For in the first place it is a record for a three-pounder to open fire at anything less than 600 yards’ range. Then, again, the gun crew stood up, a mark waist-high above the parapet of the trench, and the gun’s barrel and shield showed well above all, drawing the fire. Of course, all possible was done to mask the gun. Sacking marked with chalk to look like the sandbags of the parapet was hung over the gun shield, and the gun itself was painted to match.

    “‘Wilding said before: ‘We’re going into hell, and I do not think any of us will come out of it. But he added: ‘It’s worth the risk, for it’s nothing to what we can save the infantry if we can stick it.’

    “‘All the night before we had a weary time bringing up the gun and ammunition from Pont Logy to the frontline. The gun was mounted on a trailer pulled by an armoured car. We had to make one trip of three miles with the gun. Wilding worked with us from six in the evening to three in the morning, before the eleven hours of hell, at the finish of which he was killed. To bring the gun up to the La Bassée Road we had to take down and rebuild two barriers. The road was full of shell holes.

    “‘It was pitch dark, and the grey bonnet of the car matched the road, making it invisible to the driver’s eyes. The road was being swept by rifle and machine gun fire, for the Germans seemed to have had warning that something was brewing. After blundering on for some time – the gun went in a shell hole once and was dug out with difficulty – Captain Wilding said the only thing was to walk in front of the car, and that he would take first turn. As we did so, stray bullets whistled over our heads and struck and battered the road about us. We got the gun into place on a platform of sandbags so that it could be swung from right to left over the parapet of the trench.

    ****

    “‘Within ten minutes of opening fire the other side seemed to make a mark on us. We had a shower of shells of all sorts, from whizz-bangs to Jack Johnsons, around us. These kept on right through the day. In it Wilding was continually exposed, standing behind me and upon the parapet, watching the result of each shot. Once he warned the others to get lower and keep under cover. All the time he kept a steady run of joking and encouragement. We were so much in view that once he pointed out to me a German officer taking a squint at us, head and shoulders above their trench, his arms crooked to his binoculars. I swung the gun and pulled the trigger at the moment, and it took him away.

    “‘At nine [in the morning] our heavy guns ceased. Then the infantry on our right charged. It is a thing I shall not forget. They scrambled over the broken places and over the parapet. Picking themselves up they rushed away, kilts swinging – I think it was the London Scottish.

    “‘When Wilding ordered us to take cover, we found to our surprise none of us had taken any hurt. He was very merry during the lull. I remember his sallies at a gunner made us all laugh. He kept shouting to him to have a drink, and the poor man was as deaf as a post. We opened fire again at three [in the afternoon], keeping on at short intervals until 4.20. Wilding gave us orders to take cover and count up ammunition. I found we had only 90 rounds left. He said: ‘Hold those for a counterattack.’ For until darkness came we could not get more.

    “‘He was very pleased with the day’s work, he told me as we squatted at the bottom of the trench with our backs to the fire. He cracked jokes, but once or twice he grew more serious. Once he used the words: ‘I don’t think we shall get out of this inferno.’ And later he said: ‘I’ve left letters at my billet with instructions in case anything happens to me.’ But I laughed at the idea. I said we shouldn’t come to much harm after what we had come through all day. And I thought the German fire was slackening, I said.

    “‘Upon that we started timing the Johnsons [shells] by his chronometer. We found that they came as regularly as trains, every two-and-a-half minutes. Two or three would come together, making a heavy ‘scrooping’ noise. Some fell in front of us, sending mud all over us. And others fell all around, shaking the earth.

    “‘At 5.45 p.m. I went into the dugout facing us in the rear wall of the trench to get a drink of water. When I came out again I found Captain Wilding had gone round the traverse to the next dugout. A young officer of the Suffolks, Lieutenant Pretty, and two men of the Suffolks were there with him. A few minutes after an artillery observation officer asked for him and went into the dugout.

    “‘Another shell dropped in front, and the next one at my rear smothered me in dirt. The next moment I heard roars of laughter as the artillery officer came out and went down the line. It was nearing the time for the next shell, and I sat in the door of my dugout. I heard it coming towards me. It fell to the right. I ran round the traverse. The next dugout had disappeared.

    “‘We set to work with spades. Not very far down we came to the two soldiers – dead, of course. Then deeper, we came upon the young officer of the Suffolks. He was still living, but not for long. Further down, after difficult work, the corrugated iron and timber of the shelter was all mixed up, we found poor Wilding’s mangled body. Death must have been instantaneous. We had to wait until the next dawn to bury him. Orders came addressed to him that there was a fresh lot of shells for us to bring up in the night for the next day.

    “‘I wrapped him up in his blanket. And so, on a stretcher, lent with four men by the Indian Contingent, I took him in full view of the enemy down the La Bassée Road, swept with rifle fire, as it had been when he had trudged down it before. The action was again so hot that no officer could be spared to come with us. We turned down the lane that leads from Neuve Chapelle village to Estaires. In the corner of the little orchard close by we buried him, in his blanket.

    “‘It was the quietest and least disturbed spot we could find. Although elsewhere all the trees were ripped and torn down, here there were a few fruit trees standing. We buried him quickly and silently. There was no chaplain and no ceremony but our bared heads and our silent thoughts. When all was covered flush with green turf we put up a cross made from a packing case. On it was written:

    “‘CAPTAIN ANTHONY WILDING
    “‘Armoured Car Section
    “‘Royal Naval Air Service
    “‘Killed in Action
    “‘May 10, 1915
    “‘Died a Hero.’”
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    Last edited: May 22, 2015
    #92
  43. pc1

    pc1 Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2008
    Messages:
    9,344
    Newmark401,

    Just wanted to tell you what a great thread this is.
     
    #93
  44. newmark401

    newmark401 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,051
    I've added a couple of first names to the main sections on page 1 of this thread. J.L. Figgis was John Alfred Lenox Figgis, an Irish player; A.B. Jones was indeed Alfred Booth Jones, an Australian.
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    #94

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