A guide to tennis balls - what you WANT to know!

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by mtommer, Aug 21, 2008.

  1. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    - It seems like we need a sticky for tennis balls and I'm hoping a mod will consider this thread ideal. You also need to understand that everybody has their own personal preferences and will claim this or that about their particular favorite ball. Fine, however there are still general attributes that do hold true for a majority of players. This is not a guide to say which ball is the best or worse overall, such is entirely subjective and not really that important. This holds especially true for the pro level of ball - within this tier you can play with each ball and the ball will not hold you back in the least.





    There are many people discovering tennis all the time as well as many people who have been playing but don't know too much about some of the basics of the sport. One area that can be confusing for some is the plethora of ball choices available at any given department or chain sports store. Hopefully this guide will teach you about the differences in ball choices.



    First, let's cover pressurized balls, by far the most commonly known ball.

    The first up are the pro level balls. These are the balls you see on TV being used in the professional matches. They are the best balls you can buy and typically your best bet to find a variety of these balls lie at a Tennis/Pro shop or online like here at Tennis Warehouse. At this level you get balls that bounce, wear, and play consistently with each other from ball to ball within a can, as well as from can to can. The bounce etc. are at the level where the ball will never hold you back. The balls have the best longevity regarding playability and durability. In other words, if you're having trouble playing tennis well, it's not these balls that are the problem. Get out and practice more!!! :]

    Pro Level Balls by manufacturer:
    A. Head:
    1. Head ATP balls.
    - These are rare to see in the US and relatively new elsewhere. It is important to note that Head owns Penn, the largest tennis ball manufacturer* in the world. Head ATP balls are probably just relabeled Penn ATP balls.
    [​IMG]
    2. Head No. 1 or Pro balls.
    - These are just rebadged ProPenn balls.
    [​IMG]

    B. Penn
    1. ProPenn
    - ProPenn balls are the absolute premium Penn ball available. There isn't much difference between these and the Penn ATP balls regarding playability. Technically, the difference is in the makeup of the balls. ProPenn is made with Encore technology and LongPlay felt. These are supposed to make the ball last longer - the Encore part maintains the bounce for longer while the LongPlay felt helps the felt to keep pace with the increased wearability of the rubber core.
    [​IMG]
    2. Penn ATP
    - These are the balls with the official designation of "the ATP tour ball". While you won't see these at the grand slam tournaments, they are used in some lesser tournaments. Like the ProPenn, they are a great ball.
    [​IMG]

    Both the ProPenn and the Penn ATP balls are interchangeable with Wilson US Open balls as far as similar playability goes. They are nearly identical in almost every respect including bounce longevity, felt characteristics, and feel.

    With either Penn ball you will get excellent and satisfying performance. The universal consensus is that these balls don't hold their bounce quite as long as the Dunlop Grand Prix, Slazenger Wimbledon balls, or Tecnifibre balls. Still, it would be fair to say that these balls set the standard for which all other balls are to be judged. One caveat is that there do seem to be more dead balls in a freshly opened can than you get with other manufacturers. I myself have experienced this a few times but I've also had the same happen to me with Wilson US Open balls. I've also gone many, many, cans without getting a dead ball.

    * according to Penn's website
    ** more to come**
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2008
    #1
  2. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    C. Prince
    1. Prince Tour
    - These balls play well while they last. It's not that they don't keep their bounce. The biggest con with these balls is that they don't keep their felt. This essentially results in an extra duty felt ball becoming a regular duty felt ball while you're supposed to be using an extra duty felt ball. (Are you still with me?) While this isn't as noticeable on slower surfaces, on a typical US hard court they become little missiles, comparatively, and are harder to control and generate spin with. However, they are great for serving with!!!
    [​IMG]


    D. Slazenger/Wimbledon

    1. Wimbledon w/ UltraViz felt
    - These balls are highly exclaimed as superior by some, not so much better than Penn or Wilson by others. They are generally not seen in the US. Their reputation is that of being an excellent ball that has longer overall playability than Penn or Wilson balls, similar to Dunlop Grand Prix balls. It's important to note that there is a difference between the UltraViz and HighViz balls. You want to make sure you get those labeled as UltraViz. These balls are used for Wimbledon.
    [​IMG]


    E. Dunlop *also owns Slazenger

    1. Dunlop Grand Prix
    - These balls are the top level ball from Dunlop offered in the US. The balls are generally regarding as maintaining their bounce noticeably longer than Penn's or Wilson's top ball. The downside is that they feel harder too many and it's said that the felt has a tendency to fluff up, also noticeably more so than the others. For topspin players this is a help. For those who hit flatter strokes and serves, they probably will not like it. If you hit a lot and want to keep your costs down, or you need balls to fill a big hopper, these are recommended by many posters here.
    [​IMG]

    2. Dunlop Fort Elite/ (not sure whether the plain (no plus) Fort equals Championship or not)
    - These are simply the Grand Prix ball* with different packaging for outside of the US (and other areas?).
    [​IMG]

    *Recent Grand Prix balls may no longer be the same.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
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  3. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    3. Dunlop Roland Garros
    - These balls are labeled specifically for Roland Garros (French Open). On Dunlop's website they have their own section, seperate from the other Dunlop ball offerings. I do not know if these balls are specifically made for the Roland Garros tournament or if they are restamped Fort Plus balls. Suffice it to say, if you play on clay, you can't go wrong. I know of no US offerings though for this ball.
    [​IMG]

    F. Wilson
    1. Wilson US Open/Australian Open
    - These balls are neck n' neck with Penn balls and for which all balls should have to equal or exceed. Some will say they last longer than Penn balls. I've had times when this has felt true, I've had times when I've never noticed a difference. I chalk up the difference between what people feel (argue over) is mostly a matter of an occasional worse batch of ball manufacturing runs. When you make so many balls there's going to occasionally be a batch or two that gets past quality control. The overall characteristics are excellent playability for at least a couple of sets, if not more. These balls can be found outside of the tennis pro shop in department stores, depending upon where you're at.
    [​IMG]

    G. Tecnifibre
    1. Tecnifibre X-One
    - These balls are talked about here on TalkTennis as being the very best ball possible. It's important to note that these balls are not available in the US. They haven't been play tested by enough people on TalkTennis to get a fairly objective opinion one way or another as to their "ultimate" status. I also haven't seen enough chatter on other tennis forums to determine just how good they are compared to others.
    [​IMG]

    2. Tecnifibre Tour One
    - This is a ball that is compared with Dunlop Grand Prix regarding bounce longevity. I haven't heard of the same fluffing problem that Grand Prix balls are noted for. They aren't quite as good, by reputation, as the X-One ball. It seems to me like they are in the class of Wilson, Penn and Dunlop's top ball with preference being just that, personal.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
    #3
  4. mdrew9

    mdrew9 New User

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    Looks good, is Practice balls the next section?
     
    #4
  5. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    3. Tecnifibre Club Competition
    - Marketed with "technology" similar to the X-One ball. If it's not the same it's probably very, very, close.
    [​IMG]

    H. Gamma

    1. Pro Tour
    - I haven't played or heard too much about these balls. A few posters here on talk tennis hate the balls. I am planning on getting a couple of cans at my local pro shop and trying them out with a couple of different people to get a few personal opinions.

    *UPDATE* After the play test most people liked them although a few seemed to find they played to fast. I am in the camp that liked them. I personally didn't notice any difference between these and other balls fresh out of the can save for one thing. That being that the first bounce wasn't noticeably different from any other, the second bounce however seemed higher and more lively than any other ball I've played with. This isn't really important though, you only play one bounce in tennis. Still, it's what was observed.

    The cons with the ball was that the felt didn't stand up with use, much like the Prince Tour ball. Also, every single ball we had developed noticeable cracks at the seams after a couple of hours of play. I've never had this happen with any other ball with this frequency save for very cheap balls. This tendency may be due to the thinner core material versus that of the other balls on the market. However, the cracks splits weren't through to the core and we could still play the balls. Which brings us to the bounce longevity. These balls kept their bounce for us throughout the playtesting. Once they went though, they went. They were good, good, good, and then WAM, dead as opposed to a steady decline I feel with other balls. It's hard to say if they actually last longer or if it is just perception.

    [​IMG]

    I. Babolat (thanks to madmanfool for the information)

    1. Babolat team
    This is like the Dunlop fort of Babolat, but it lasts longer and is a slightly heavier ball. They also play better than the Dunlop when being just out the box. Best Babolat ball for sure.
    [​IMG]

    2. Babolat VS
    Heavier than the team and because of that more longlivety. Also more expensive. Great if you want a ball with which you can play like forever.
    [​IMG]

    I think this covers pretty much all of the pro level balls that I can think of. Next I will be covering the next, lower, tier of balls.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
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  6. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    Tier Two - The second best ball.

    Next up in our run of pressurized balls are those aimed at the experienced, but not competitive, level. These are the balls that you can find at just about any department store including Target, KMart, Wal-Mart, etc. Almost universal in the naming scheme from all companies is the inclusion of Championship in the name. Penn Championship, Wilson Championship, and so on. So why do you see these balls just about everywhere? Well, for most casual players, these balls are cheaper, and when you only play a few times a week, often for the social aspect of tennis, they represent a great value.

    Just how bad are these balls then? Well, they really aren't that bad at all right out of the can. Many people play local tournaments, where you bring your own can of balls, with these level of balls. For the most part they bounce and play well. The most notable lacking in these balls is their lack of overall durability and longevity while playing. Also, the consistency from ball to ball and can to can is not there. If you open a can of these balls, let them go at the same height, you'll see that often the return bounce height isn't quite the same comparatively, enough so that it is noticeable. The seams also tend to split easier and the felt gets worn out pretty quickly. These balls lose their bounce fairly quickly. I've known many people who simply throw these balls away after using them for their playing time for the day.

    Overall though, if you really just don't play that much per week (or two), they are perfect for you. If for some reason you forgot your balls at home and had to stop to get some, you could certainly use these balls and be happy for the day. The more advanced player would probably buy an extra can or two just in case they wear them out while playing hard.

    For this section there really just isn't enough difference between the balls to really differentiate them so I'll just list them with pictures so you know what they look like.

    A. Penn
    1. Penn Championship
    [​IMG]

    2. Penn Ti
    [​IMG]

    B. Dunlop
    1. Dunlop Championship
    [​IMG]

    2. Dunlop Pro
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2008
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  7. Charlie_Boy

    Charlie_Boy Semi-Pro

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    Great guide, thanks for making it!

    But would you happen to know any reason why the X-One is not available in the US?
     
    #7
  8. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    3. Dunlop Abzorber
    [​IMG]

    C. Wilson
    1. Wilson Championship
    - These balls are also used in various "paintjobs" to support various causes.*

    *I would also like to note that lately I've been seeing Wilson Grand Slam balls on store shelves. These have taken the place of Wilson Championship balls in those stores. I do not know if these are in fact Championship balls with a new name. The balls themselves look the same but I'd like to note that I do not see "ITF approved" on the labels of the Grand Slam balls. Mostly I've seen this in department stores like Wal-Mart and Target.

    Two things to note here: 1. Wal-Mart and such like to to try and push mfg. to make products cheaper. This usually results in a lowering of quality materials to achieve this by the mfg or a significant revamp of their supply chain to save costs. 2. My guess is that the SKU number used for ordering these products never changed and the change is simply cosmetic by the mfg. Hard to tell and the Grand Slam balls are not currently listed on the US website.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
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  9. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    2. Wilson Titanium
    [​IMG]

    D. Prince
    1. Prince Championship
    [​IMG]

    E. Tecnifibre
    1. Tecnifibre Champion One
    [​IMG]

    F. Gamma
    1. Gamma Champioship
    [​IMG]



    So this wraps up the second highest level of tennis balls and ends what I would consider playable balls.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2009
    #9
  10. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    LOL,, Gamma pro tour ball saids it is absolutely the best playing ball in the world.. Yes i do hate that ball. Reason is this. It is very hard ball, one of the hardest balls, i have ever hit with. and it flies around like it is on Steroids.......therefore making it impossible to control the ball. so that is why i hate it..
     
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  11. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    Also the proPenn and Penn ATP plays slightly different. it is my opinion, maybe someone else feels different. I feel that Penn ATP plays better and i had better control with that ball, meaning more predictable bounce. Propenn does last little longer however.
     
    #11
  12. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    Oh and Thank you for the great review.
     
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  13. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    Tier Three (lowest quality) tennis balls....

    So now we come to the third tier of tennis balls. "If we can't get much lower in playability from the second tier, why are these sold?" Well, this tier represents tennis balls intended solely for the recreational player.

    Just who is this type of player? This is the type of player you see on the court who has trouble hitting the ball in the first place or who's idea of a "great shot" is simply a ball that they actually managed to get in the court. These people are the type of players who really aren't players per se, they are simply out having a really great time doing something they don't normally do. They are laughing, having a lot of fun, and just enjoying being outside. They don't care about what racquet they use. They probably don't know you can even get them restrung if they break the string. I doubt they even know who Federer is. All this type of player wants is a tennis ball as cheap as they can find them.

    So, are they really bad balls or are they just passed over by the "snobby poser" who wants to look like they know what they're doing? Look at it like this, if the second tier ball were to represent those balls that didn't pass the inspection for the pro grade ball, these represent those balls that couldn't pass the inspections for the second level of balls.

    The answer then is that they really aren't good balls. They're, maybe, passable balls. It's hit or miss as to whether you'll get a decent ball from the can. These are the balls that within one game of decent paced hitting, you just might actually split them apart at the seams rendering them useless. Besides that, the felt is cheap and terrible, the bounce can be lopsided and is usually very inconsistent from ball to ball, let alone from bounce to bounce, and you'll come upon dead balls straight from the can all too often. They are probably made along with all the generics. If you want to work on improving your reactions to bad bounces, use these balls against a wall. Some people like to use these for practice balls but they are in fact lower than truly named practice balls. I would also note that there's usually less than a .50 cent difference between these and the second tier level balls.

    For this level I'm simply going to name the balls

    Penn Court One
    [​IMG]

    Penn Tribute

    Wilson Tribute

    Dunlop Progress
    [​IMG]

    Generic
    - These can fall under various brands. If they don't have the name of any manufacturer from the top tier ball on them (within the US), they are most likely generics and at this level.



    Practice

    Now, the last category is an interesting category. If you've been to a tennis club or live near a college/university (that practices outside sometimes) you will have probably come across this next type of ball. These balls are the practice balls.

    Before I mentioned an analogy of how the third tier balls stack up to the second tier balls, like rejects. However, between the different levels of balls you have to realize that their very manufacturing is different and that they really aren't rejects of each other. The practice balls, however, are. They are in fact the rejects from the top and second level of balls. These range from cosmetic imperfections to other reasons for rejection, like misapplied felt (seams not even width throughout the balls). This is good in that they really play like good balls. It can be bad because sometimes you'll get Championship level balls and sometimes you'll get the pro level ball. Because you're practicing, it's not a big deal and they are often bought in large batches by clubs etc.

    For this level I don't have any pictures but I will mention their common names as best I can from memory.

    Wilson Team
    Penn Coach
    Dunlop Practice
    Gamma Practice

    I can't recall ever seeing these retail so don't plan on finding them. If you're lucky you'll know someone who can get them for you, a teaching pro for example. However, don't be surprised if you have to buy at least a case or two in order to get them. You might even be able to find them online, although, again, I suspect it's by the case (but I could be wrong).
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2008
    #13
  14. ThA_Azn_DeViL

    ThA_Azn_DeViL Semi-Pro

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    Sticky it!
     
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  15. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    ^^Do you know what happen to the WILSON double core balls. i think they used to use it in davis cup. for some reason it disappeared.
     
    #15
  16. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    Pressureless balls

    Pressureless Balls

    This will be very brief as I don't have much experience with these balls. If someone could add to this section I'd appreciate it.

    At the top end of pressureless balls lies the Tretorn Micro X balls.

    A. Tretorn
    1. Tretorn Micro X
    - These are not a true pressureless ball. These balls are filled with little beads that effectively keep the ball "inflated" so that you have to wear out the beads before the ball goes dead. These balls are without a doubt the next best thing to pressurized balls. They beat any pressureless ball hands down. However, they aren't sold in the US. Also, if you order them online, be prepared for the high initial cost compared to the cost of a regular case of pressurized balls (US pricing).
    [​IMG]
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    Next up are the balls sold here at Tennis Warehouse. I'm not sure how these balls stack up to the next ball I'm going to mention. As far as I know they aren't the same, they're better, but again, I could very well be wrong. I would talk to the TW staff and ask about their experience with these balls.
    [​IMG]
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .

    The last level of pressureless ball I've come across are those balls you find in the little net bag at department stores. I'll simply say that I don't think they should be labeled as tennis balls. They should be labeled as dog chew toys. Simply put, they don't bounce very well and it's like hitting a foam tennis training ball more than a real tennis ball.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2008
    #16
  17. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    TRAINING/ LEARNING AID BALLS
    These balls basically are just to learn the game with. They're usually soft foam or really soft (squishy) balls. Don't even try playing an actual game with these (LOL though it is fun to do for kicks!!!). They're made simply to keep from bouncing far away so beginners can hit the ball more often without having to run balls down. They're great for little kids!


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2008
    #17
  18. Il Mostro

    Il Mostro Banned

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    Really great job on this. Yes, it should be a sticky.
     
    #18
  19. Mikael

    Mikael Professional

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    Excellent job. One brand I was looking for and couldnt find in your posts is Nassau. We used to play with them a lot in Brazil considering they were much cheaper than Dunlops or Wilsons. Apparently it is an Indonesian brand...
     
    #19
  20. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    Nassau

    Tier One (pro level) ball

    1. Nassau Czar
    *from the Nassau website - no personal experience of knowledge of these balls*
    Nassau Czar is played by top tennis player in premier events.
    It features tournament-grade felt and new natural rubber core for precise bounce.
    Made with Millken Woven felt (Extra-duty felt) for longer life and higher consistency.
    Approved by ITF. Pressurized
    For hard court surface 3ball /4ball pet can are available
    This approved ball is highly recommended for pro shops and Specialty

    For quality acknowledgement. we have sponsored to big and small tournaments such as
    1988 Seoul Olympic Game ( Official Tennis ball ),
    1986 Asian Game ( Offcial ball for Tennis, Soccer, Volley & Hand ball ),
    1988-90 The Australian Open (Official Tennis ball ) and the most renowned tennis school,
    Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy ( NBTA Official Ball )

    [​IMG]


    Tier Two level ball

    1. Nassau Championship
    - Please note that the Championship moniker also denotes their pressureless balls.
    [​IMG]


    Tier Three (lowest quality) ball


    1. Nassau All Purpose (Pratriot)
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2008
    #20
  21. scraps234

    scraps234 Hall of Fame

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    have anything on teloon or the babolat balls btw this guide is fantastic it should b stickyed
     
    #21
  22. RakettoKozou

    RakettoKozou Rookie

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    A prime job indeed.
     
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  23. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    As others are starting to mention, there are a lot of lesser known balls manufactured, especially if you live outside of the US. The ITF compiles a list of all the balls that they approve. This approval means that any of the balls on the list are, at the very least, Tier Two in quality. For example, you probably haven't ever heard of Welkin, Star or Kaiser labeled tennis balls. For the sake of brevity I won't list pictures of all these ball choices. Instead, I'm posting a link to ITF's list of approved balls. Many ball choices also have a picture associated with them. Without adequate experience with most of these obscure brands I don't think that guessing about their quality and playability will serve useful for anyone. Suffice it to say though, the majority of tennis players will never come across these balls unless they are trying really hard to seek them out. If you or others you know have experience with any of the obscure tennis ball brands, please post your observations.

    http://www.itftennis.com/technical/equipment/balls/balllist.asp
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2008
    #23
  24. ag200boy

    ag200boy Hall of Fame

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    we need a mod, this has GOT to be stickied
     
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  25. scraps234

    scraps234 Hall of Fame

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    ^^^ i second that it rlly should b stickied
     
    #25
  26. Charlie_Boy

    Charlie_Boy Semi-Pro

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    Tecnifibre Club Competition

    Those balls offered in the US?
     
    #26
  27. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    I asked this before but do you guys know what happened to Wilson DC double core Balls that they used use in Davis cup play.?? those were the best balls ever
     
    #27
  28. paulmaben

    paulmaben Rookie

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    What about K3 tennis balls. They make silver and gold varieties and aren't too bad to hit with.
     
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  29. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    I fired off an email. If I hear anything back I'll post it.
     
    #29
  30. nCode747

    nCode747 Semi-Pro

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    sticky .
     
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  31. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    The response back from Wilson about the double core balls.


    Response (Deborah Salerno) - 08/29/2008 11:40 AM
    Thank you for writing. The double core tennis balls are no longer being manufactured.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2008
    #31
  32. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    ^^^ I wonder why they discontinued the best tennis balls they ever made. and they are continuing these crappy US open balls.?
     
    #32
  33. mrw

    mrw Semi-Pro

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    Very well done and this would be a worth while sticky
     
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  34. mtnpaul

    mtnpaul New User

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    Are either of these available in High Altitude versions?
     
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  35. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    The Head web site doesn't say. However, Penn ATP comes in a High Altitude version, and since they're the same ball, just go with those.
     
    #35
  36. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    Is the Head ATP ball the official ball of Masters series ?
     
    #36
  37. WHSTENNIS

    WHSTENNIS Rookie

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    I like looking at all the pics :). Nice guide though really helped.
     
    #37
  38. game set match 46 TIMES!!

    game set match 46 TIMES!! Hall of Fame

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    Reporting the score as two bagels!!
    ummm at my friends store they have treton micro x balls in the us soz for late post
     
    #38
  39. reflexace

    reflexace New User

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    awesome thread idea mtommer, hope we can all contribute our experiences on tennis balls to this thread, now that we have all the essentials in this guide!

    btw, anyone know where to get those tecnifibre balls, especially in australia? thanks
     
    #39
  40. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    Why/how is the Dunlop ABZORBER a second tier ball? They're priced like a premium ball. They also play like a premium ball. I believe they are a premium ball, like a Dunlop Grand Prix....way better than ProPenns or Wilson US Opens.
     
    #40
  41. Charlie_Boy

    Charlie_Boy Semi-Pro

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    C. Prince
    1. Prince Tour
    - These balls play well while they last. It's not that they don't keep their bounce. The biggest con with these balls is that they don't keep their felt. This essentially results in an extra duty felt ball becoming a regular duty felt ball while you're supposed to be using an extra duty felt ball. (Are you still with me?) While this isn't as noticeable on slower surfaces, on a typical US hard court they become little missiles, comparatively, and are harder to control and generate spin with. However, they are great for serving with!!!

    I kind of liked these balls. Holding their felt wasn't a problem....they seemed to fluff up just a bit after an extended period of time playing with them.
     
    #41
  42. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I'm not overly impressed with the Prince extra duty felt balls because they do fuzz up pretty quickly. On the other hand, I love the regular duty felt balls. I buy them by the case for use on har-tru courts. For whatever reason, the regular duty felt ball bounces higher than any other ball made. After I use them, I keep them as practice balls in my bag for a week or two. Many times, I can take a used 2 week old Prince ball and it will bounce higher than a brand new can of Penn regular duty felt balls straight out of the can. The Technifibre regular duty felt balls are my number 2 clay court ball.
     
    #42
  43. f1 tech

    f1 tech Semi-Pro

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    TW just started selling Head tennis balls.
     
    #43
  44. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

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    Very good thread and well done by OP :)

    Just a suggestion: Edit and Add a summary table at the top of your first post.
     
    #44
  45. TonyB

    TonyB Hall of Fame

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    Why isn't this a sticky???

    Great summary of the available balls. I don't necessarily agree with the specific details of the ball quality, but I would say your ratings are generally quite accurate.

    Only improvement I can see would be to include a link to the Racquetsportsindustry ball review.
     
    #45
  46. pennc94

    pennc94 Semi-Pro

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    #46
  47. Captain Tezuka

    Captain Tezuka Rookie

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    Are you people looking for any mod because I think I've got one??

    Post back and I'll check everyday ok?

    BTW very interesting and informative thread thanks.
     
    #47
  48. Teamtomo

    Teamtomo Semi-Pro

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    Good guide :) MAKE IT A STICKY !!!!! :mad:
     
    #48
  49. fin-tennis(h)

    fin-tennis(h) Rookie

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    Wilson Tour (Davis cup ball) is basically the new version of Double Core.
     
    #49
  50. 120mphBodyServe

    120mphBodyServe Banned

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    I'll go out on a limb and say they're probably not as profitable as the double core balls...
    Double core lasts too long, thereby reducing the need for you to replace that can of balls, so they discontinue it so you have to buy their le crap ball...
    Problem of capitalism and the monetary system is that it's based on cyclical consumption, which isn't sustainable.
    Wonderful isn't it?
     
    #50

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