a question that i need to get answered...

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by fatboy, Nov 25, 2004.

  1. fatboy

    fatboy New User

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    hi.. i have a question... i have a friend that bench press 100kgs (about 220lbs) and the most they can do is about 6-8 reps.. however i saw this guy at the gym the other day.. he puts on the same amount of weight but he does from what i count 15-20 reps of the same weight.. my question might sound a bit dumb but i dont really know much about weight as i'm starting to learn about it.. i know that when u do 6-8 reps it is count as bulking.. therefore what my friend is trying to do is to bulk up.. but what about this guy? as many trainer say 20 reps is more of endurance... so is this guy training for endurance? but does the 100kgs will bulk him up as much as the one that does 6 reps? thank you
     
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  2. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

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    Well, everything is relative and must be referred I guess to the 1RM (1 rep max) the maximum load that one is able to do. They very probably don't have the same 1RM.

    As per:
    http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/weight.htm
    ------------
    The amount of weight to be used should be based on a percentage of the maximum amount of weight that can be lifted one time, generally referred to as one repetition maximum (1RM). The maximum number of repetitions performed before fatigue prohibits the completion of an additional repetition is a function of the weight used, referred to as repetition maximum (RM), and reflects the intensity of the exercise. A weight load that produces fatigue on the third repetition is termed a three repetition maximum (3RM) and corresponds to approximately 95% of the weight that could be lifted for 1RM.
    ------------

    Thus one of them could be with 220lbs at 60% and the other at 85% of their max and thus the first trains for endurance and the other for bulk (in relative terms), as I see it. But this is valid only if the one doing 6-8 reps does that to the point of failure, i.e. he can't do more at that weight, he's finished.

    Read the links under:
    Strength, Weight Training
    in my posting at:
    Great Fitness Sites:
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/viewtopic.php?t=23127
     
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  3. J D

    J D Rookie

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    Fatboy, to answer your questions directly (assuming reps to point of failure), 8-12 reps are considered the range for maximum bulk and strength gain, 13-15 are the range for balance of strength gain and endurance without as much bulking or loss of flexibility, and 16+ is the range for toning, endurance, a little strength gain, and no loss of flexibility. This is for upper body exercises.

    The lower body ranges are 12-15 for bulk, 16-20 for balance, and 20+ for toning and endurance. Many will say that the increased limits for lower body should only pertain to exercises involving the hamstring (squats, leg press, etc...).

    The stronger guy that could do 20 reps with the heavier weight wasn't getting the same type of benefit as your friend that could only do 6 reps. At 20 reps, he's not going to gain a lot of strength or bulk. He may have just been using that as his warm up before increasing the weight.

    To bring up a related point, consistently working out with a weight that you can't do at least 8 reps with creates a lot of extra stress on the muscles, joints, ligaments and tendons. It is not the best approach to weight training for the long haul.
     
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  4. jun

    jun Semi-Pro

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    if one guy can bench 100lb 5~6 times, but the other guy can bench 100lb 20 times....Who's stronger?

    High reps are for endurance and toning but you have to look at high much weight they are lifting...
     
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  5. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

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    This is what I am using myself.

    However, I would like to point out that this seems to be a controversial issue in the literature. Check the reference to Dr. Lister in the following:

    Also note the obs re the duration of the exercise.
    I'd encourage the reader to check the original doc in full for this item.
     
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  6. tennis-n-sc

    tennis-n-sc Professional

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    A lot has to do with the particular sport one is training for. I.E., a college football player would have quite a different workout than a college tennis player. It is interesting to note the difference between the bulk/strength training of college football players and the NFL combine test, which places a lot of emphasis on how many times a player can bench press 225# and the vertical leaping ability. I doubt you will be starting off with 220#.
     
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  7. CoASH

    CoASH Rookie

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    20 rep squats are a different thing. you're actually using your 10RM in that.
     
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