A shout out to all who had ACL reconstruction.

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by sachin_patel, Jul 8, 2013.

?

Which ACL graft you used?

Poll closed Jul 15, 2013.
  1. Hamstring

    16.7%
  2. Pateller

    83.3%
  3. Cadaver (can you explain which type of graft from Cadaver?)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. sachin_patel

    sachin_patel New User

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    Hi All,
    I have to go through the ACL surgery and my doctor suggested Cadaver graft. I wanted to know if there are people who used this graft and are having no issues. Please help me make a decision.

    Can you please also answer below two questions?

    Thanks.

    (1) What ACL graft was used? (If not included in poll)
    (2) How long ago was the injury and any issues so far?
     
    #1
  2. fantom

    fantom Hall of Fame

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    I'm on my 5th year since my ACL recon. Contralateral (opposite knee) patellar tendon autograft. My knee feels like new.

    When I made my decision, I learned a lot about all of the pros/cons of the graft type. I chose against the cadaver graft because it was weaker and there was greater chance for infection. I chose against the hamstring because I didn't like the fact that the removed hamstring tendons never grow back and can lead to loss of hamstring strength.

    The middle 1/3 of the patellar tendon is used for the new ACL and the outside thirds are stitched together. In time, the patellar tendon regenerates to its original (or close to it) size.

    No matter what graft type you choose, make sure you are happy and confident with the surgeon performing the surgery. Also, follow EVERY rehab direction they give you. It takes a lot of work that can be very monotonous. Don't skip steps and don't leave out steps.
     
    #2
  3. sachin_patel

    sachin_patel New User

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    no issues in other knee? like jumper's knee or sensitivity when kneeling down?
     
    #3
  4. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    My 11 year old daughter (now 12) had ACL reconstruction last year & I did plenty of research. We also got lucky because there is a surgeon here who does a special surgery using the IT Band and going around the knee rather than through to avoid the growth plate. BTW, it has been just over a year and she is doing great!

    Here is what I learned:
    1) the surgery is rather routine now.
    2) here in Columbus, we have some of the best surgeons.
    3) the other/healthy knee graft is controversial but highly recommended due to the fact you'll be rehabbing both knees together and building equal strength.

    Good luck. It is a big deal but you'll recover. The best advice we got was to do as much strength training and exercises we could before surgery to help with the rehab. She was the quickest they'd ever saw recover from her type of surgery.

    You could be back in action in 4-6 months.
     
    #4
  5. fantom

    fantom Hall of Fame

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    Never had jumper's knee. Sensitivity to kneeling down took 2-3 years to go away. My surgeon said that the brain has to re-train itself as to what feels normal concerning knee sensitivity.
     
    #5
  6. fantom

    fantom Hall of Fame

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    The only reason I went this route was because I felt most comfortable with the surgeon who did it this way. It did greatly speed up my rehabilitation by splitting up the two rehabs that needed performed. I was playing tennis at about 3-4 months. It took a full year to feel confident in my mind, though.

    ACL knee: healing, reducing swelling, regaining range of motion. All exercised concentrated on these things.

    Graft knee: Regaining quad strength due to losing part of the patellar tendon. Really no swelling present on this knee.
     
    #6
  7. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    1999 patella autograph. Took me a year to get back to tennis, 3 years post op to shed my custom brace but that was more psychological.

    2 bouts of tendonitis of the patella tendon due to scarring couple years afterwards and couple years apart. No biggie.
    Can't deep squat, and if kneeling, can't sit back on my heels. Graft is too tight. But better too tight than too loose!

    No issues with tennis or any other sport.
     
    #7
  8. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    Another thing to consider.....an autograph (your own tendon) means you'll have a pretty big scar on your knee.

    Allograph (cadavar graft), you'll just have some small incisions where the arthroscope is inserted.

    So if appearance is important to you, something to consider.
     
    #8
  9. Abbygrant

    Abbygrant New User

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    Cadaver graft for my ACL reconstruction in 1997 (I think). I've had no issues. I wore a sport brace until it had been 1 year from surgery and my physical therapist checked the strength in the knee to make sure it was 100%. I did all my physical therapy religiously.
     
    #9
  10. aussie

    aussie Professional

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    I don't want to worry you, but the IT Band knee reconstruction is not regarded as a particularly successful knee reconstruction option. I had my left knee reconstructed using the Illio Tibial Band method (the IT Band is split in two with one part crossing through the knee to act as a fake ACL) and mine lasted well for 6 years. My knee felt completely stable until one night I planted my left foot to hit a backhand, and as I followed through and opened my shoulders the knee gave way again.

    When I eventually had my knee reconstructed again, I asked the surgeon why my knee had collapsed again. He said that they no longer performed the ITB method as they had found that illio tibial bands acting as an ACL tend to stretch over time and no longer remain tight enough to keep the femur from momentarily dislocating from the tibia (which is what happens when the ACL ruptures).

    My second reconstruction used the middle third of the patella tendon and has been completely successful. Took 6 months of rehab to get the full use of the knee back, but probably another year to get my confidence back that I could rely on it being completely stable. I had the second reconstruction done in 1995 so its been 18 years since then and although I have a little pain and stiffness, I was still playing up until Feb this year when tennis elbow struck me down. All up I have had 2 reconstructions on my left knee as well as 6 arthroscopies on it to trim meniscus and debride osteo-arthritis and have had 2 arthroscopies on my right knee as well.

    The fact that your daughter is young may really assist with the ITB method being successful for her as the whole growth process of her body may well add additional strength to the ITB running through the joint. I was 29 when I first ruptured my ACL and perhaps it can add comfort to you and others that 2 reconstructions and multiple arthroscopies later I've still got reasonably pain free, stable and functional knees now at 59.

    I wish you the best. aussie
     
    #10
  11. 604al

    604al New User

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    Mine was a hamstring graft 3 years ago and it's never been the same since... my hamstring is still noticeably weaker.
     
    #11
  12. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    Wow! You must have had an old school doc. I haven't seen or heard of using hamstring grafts in a looong time.
     
    #12
  13. TCF

    TCF Hall of Fame

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    I had the patella graft done years ago. Even though aggressive rehad was started before leaving the hospital bed, it took about 2 years for all the pain to completely go away and the knee to return to full strength. But zero issues in over 10 years now.
     
    #13
  14. sachin_patel

    sachin_patel New User

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    I litterally can't differentiate my injured knee vs my good knee in day to day activities... haven't tried running or jumping though..very confused..
     
    #14
  15. fantom

    fantom Hall of Fame

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    Your ACL isn't needed for day to day activities like walking and standing. It is during side-to-side direction changes that the ACL is needed for stability.
     
    #15
  16. ForLoveOfTheGame

    ForLoveOfTheGame Semi-Pro

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    I have had both knees done. Right knee hamstring about 16 years ago when I was 16 and left knee patellar a fews ago. The hamstring one is a little looser but I never had the knee pain that I got after the patellar graft. Not only did it leave a massive scar (not desirable for a girl) it also left me with about a year of pain and instability in the patellar region. There are positives and negatives to using different ligaments but I think the patellar feels a little stuffer than the hamstring. I would NOT recommend a cadaver. Now I have meniscus tears in both knees but my pain is kept to a minimum when I do regular leg strengthening exercises and stretches. I'd also highly recommended yoga.
     
    #16
  17. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    No.

    10additionalnos.
     
    #17
  18. ximian

    ximian Rookie

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    Check out my ACL reconstruction thread, I just recently added a 3-year update. I went with the hamstring graft, it seemed best to me and its worked out great! I didn't want a cadaver since there is a chance of infection. I know a few people who have had ACL reconstruction with the cadaver and their body rejected it. No matter the small odds, you are running that risk if you choose a cadaver! And if your body rejects the graft, it's a huge, horrible, long ordeal. Not worth, in my opinion.
     
    #18
  19. sachin_patel

    sachin_patel New User

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    do you know how they knew that their body rejected the graft?

    did it break easily or got dissolved or they got fevers or some sickness? and also how long did it take for them to detect it?

    I have a cadaver graft. I am feeling much better after four weeks. Just curious.. hopefully my body will not reject it :)
     
    #19
  20. Micalzon

    Micalzon Rookie

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    I did the patellar graft (same knee) almost 2 years ago after tearing my ACL and MCL while playing basketball. It seemed like it took me forever to recover, but I do think the doc rushed the surgery a little (to try and get me in before the end of the year for insurance purposes). I did all the rehab and started off with some a lot of spin classes and then some light running on a treadmill. I worked to build up more strength in it and have been back playing now fairly regularly (2-4/week) and haven't had any issues. The knee feels very strong, though I may never test it out on the basketball court again. I've never worn a brace with the exception of a neoprene brace when I started running, but that was more to serve as a reminder that I had an injured knee and to take it easy on corners. Strengthening and stretching are the keys to a good recovery. That, and patience. Everyone's experiences are different.
     
    #20

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