achilles tendinitis because of tennis serve

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Chenx15, Sep 14, 2011.

  1. Chenx15

    Chenx15 Banned

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    i'm not sure if i am the only one experiencing this but i have been experiencing achilles tendinits. i've noticed that they are not there when i am just practising ground strokes or overhead. but i experience them when i'm practising my serves. anyone else experiencing this? they are even worst after a 3 set gruelling match when i'm trying to incorporate more spins on my serves.
     
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  2. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    I don't I bend very far on serve but have tight calf issues

    I'm not knowledgeable in these tricky issues. I believe that for me plantar fasciitis injuries and achilles pains are associated with calf muscles that are too short and tight. In particular, since much tennis is done with a bent knee, especially the knee motion in serving, the Soleus calf muscle should be considered. I don't bend my knees enough while serving and the mild achilles pain that I had last year was probably from some other motion.

    The straight knee calf stretches that most tennis players do might not be effective for the Soleus. Search soleus, anatomy, stretches. ?

    I have read that you should stretch properly only after warm-up and never stretch while injured.

    My opinions and some information are in this thread, reply #16 -

    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=377773

    The announcers on TV often trivialize tendinitis and coax players to get back playing. After seeing a serious case of tennis elbow end the tennis of one of my tennis friends, 40, the possibly chronic nature of tendinitis scares me. I also read that stressing a tendon injury while it is healing can lead to chronic - read permanent - tendinitis. Important to stop playing right away.........Take tendinitis seriously.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2012
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  3. NBM

    NBM Rookie

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    That's good you;ve isolated the move that is causing your achilles tendonitis.
    I would avoid stretching. other than the most gentle stretching. You will likely further damage an already damaged tendon.
    Weak calf muscles can be the problem, but it is more likely something wrong with your foot strike, which sports orthotics can fix. Maybe you are a pronator or have very high arches. Or you simply overused the tendon over a long period of time.
    A good place to start it to try some sort of fairly rigid heel insert. That will help keep your achilles from hyper extending on that axis.
    You may also wish to examine your service motion and see if you can come up w. something which takes a little pressure off the tendon. Often serve/volleyers get this because of the first agressive push into the court which hyper extends the achilles.
    I had chronic achilles tendonitis for about 5 years, sometimes in both, and my solution was rigid sports custom orthotics w. rigid heel lifts built in.
    good luck
    Mojo
     
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  4. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I've only experienced that ailment when I had bad shoes - probably a combination of no shock absorption along with improper ankle alignment. I agree that you might be able to fix things easily with an orthodic insert that gives your ankles good orientation. You want them to be nicely straight up-and-down when standing at rest, not either rolled in toward your arches or rolled out toward the edges of your feet.

    When I had that problem a while back, I got some inserts that ran just from my heels to the front of my arches and my ankles were back to 100% in literally a day or two. Hopefully that's all the help you need.
     
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  5. maxpotapov

    maxpotapov Hall of Fame

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    I've experienced similar problems until I started paying more attention to my balance and weight transfer. I used to put too much pressure on my left leg, and, when my body uncoiled, I could hardly get it off the ground and this is where I pulled my achilles tendon (by dragging my left foot with too much weight on the balls/toes).

    To fix this issue I started placing my left foot parallel to the baseline. This way I effectively blocked unwanted weight transfer and created a "hurdle" to jump over (which is my left foot perpendicular to where I'm going) to avoid foot dragging/achilles tendon pulling. This trick worked for me for a while and later on I improved my technique to ensure even weight distribution and easy lift off.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2011
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  6. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Welcome to old age! When the body starts to decline, like when you turn 30, your physical skills have already peaked and are on their way to the ground, 6' under.
    So adopt less leg drive, more forward movement, to compensate for the lack of hops availible. Your serve won't suffer too much, and you're closer inside the court, so consider adopting S/V also.
    Your Achilles is sore for a reason, and most likely, it's used too hard too often.
    Don't do repeated standing long jumps either.
     
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  8. Chenx15

    Chenx15 Banned

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    thanks guys oddly enough most of you are correct, it's over use and i need orthotics and are on their way. LeeD got it nailed on the head too, overuse and age are starting to get to me. kinda sucks but it is what it is. i don't go for too much on my serve but it is what it is
     
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  9. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Correct by Heel Orthodics or Stretching?

    Orthodics that raise the heel shorten the calf. People often report good results.

    My preference has been to lengthen the two calf muscles by stretching.

    I believe that the tight calf issues might be related to spending too many hours of the day with semi-pointed toes resulting in shortened calves. Included are sleeping, sitting at the computer and watching TV, etc.

    Good luck with it.
     
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  10. kipdole

    kipdole New User

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    My achilles is finally feeling better after changing my serve. My right achilles had been sore for over a year. I have changed my server by no longer jumping and to use more wrist. I'm over 50...
     
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  11. maggmaster

    maggmaster Hall of Fame

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    I had a tight feeling in my achilles for a few months, I started working in a a wall stretch that Charliefederer mentioned, no more tightness. It is awesome. Basically you perform a a calf stretch but you bend your knee.
     
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  12. red rook

    red rook Rookie

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    I had achilles tendonitis after a bad ankle sprain. Came back probably too soon and used the healthy ankle too much. Jumping with it, landing with it, pushing off it only. Overdid it. Its just now coming back to earth. Had a nasty bump or ridge right on the achilles tendon.
     
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  13. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    My tendinitis happened in both ankles. I still have some small bumps there but very little pain now.
     
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