Adjusted Davis Cup Format

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by tennisballer, Aug 13, 2014.

  1. tennisballer

    tennisballer Rookie

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    I know there have been discussions surrounding Davis Cup about moving it to alternating years to give it a more "special" feel. Have they ever given it thought about adjusting the format as well? What if they were to have the first two singles matches played simultaneously (a la college tennis) on side-by-side courts? I think this would really ramp up the circus-like atmosphere and really add to the excitement of the matches. Maybe on day 2, they could either play 2 doubles matches side-by-side or 1 doubles and 1 singles. Day 3 would be played much like day 1. In my opinion, I think this format could really help change the outlook of Davis Cup for the better and help ensure the best players from each nation are playing.
     
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  2. MCallanan

    MCallanan Rookie

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    Do they really need to adjust anything? It seems to be well supported and well attended in most hosting countries outside of the United States. And to say it lightly, I put a lot of the blame on the USTA for hosting these ties in small markets notorious for not coming out to support locals sports (Jacksonville, Boise, San Diego, et al.).
     
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  3. George Opelka

    George Opelka New User

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    Big city markets would certainly help. I attended both Birmingham and Jacksonville. Birmingham tickets sold out almost immediately, then Fed pulled out. If Fed pulled out in advance of sales, I suspect it would have impacted the box office. Jacksonville was a morgue and frankly, I think there's no excuse for the low numbers other than poor planning and execution.

    In my opinion, the Davis Cup format is a recipe for disaster, Friday and Saturday in particular. Friday is a work day and it's difficult for the masses to attend. Saturday is a great day to watch tennis, but a doubles match just isn't going to draw the masses on a Saturday.

    I love the college format and I think Davis Cup needs a complete overhaul, but that will not happen in my lifetime. In my opinion, a simple teak of moving doubles to Friday and singles to Saturday & Sunday (2 out of 3 sets) would draw more fans.
     
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  4. sjoerdklarenbeek

    sjoerdklarenbeek Rookie

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    I think doubles would deserve a more prominent place than just being the first match on Friday.

    I think I'd let them play 3 singles and 2 doubles. One doubles match on Friday, 2 singles on Saturday, and a singles followed by a possibly deciding doubles on Sunday.

    It's up to the national tennis associations to make sure there's plenty of media coverage, a good venue, and to motivate their top players.
     
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  5. Kirijax

    Kirijax Hall of Fame

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    I liked the way the Federation Cup used to hold their tournaments until the mid-90s I think. The whole tournament was held during one week. Two singles and one doubles a day, the winner advancing to the next day. It was no different than a regular week-long tournament. The whole affair wasn't spread out over a year and with the right publicity it could be another major event for tennis.
     
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  6. MCallanan

    MCallanan Rookie

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    It would be great if they could move the doubles match to Friday but I think the worry is having singles best 3 out of 5 on back to back days; e.g. not giving the players enough rest.

    One thing that would be beneficial is to push the matches back later into the day. These first rubber matinees prevent the working public from attending.

    I can't speak for the attendance of the Davis Cup as a whole. Having said that, in the United States when you see Djokovic headlining in Boise and the crowd at 25% capacity or Murray headlining in San Diego and the crowd being even smaller it makes you question the USTA's decision of targeting small markets. Put Davis Cup in Los Angeles, Boston, New York City, et al. and you will naturally see larger and more enthusiastic crowds. Furthermore you will receive better press coverage which helps out the event and the sport in general.
     
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  7. Lemmy

    Lemmy New User

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    Wasn't the Superbowl or something like that held within minutes of Murray's match against Querrey? The other match was on a working day
     
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  8. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    I agree, do it like a Masters or regular tour event. All at one time for a week (8 teams) or 10 days (16 teams).

    The big problem is that Davis Cup has reverse singles, so you can't really do a team match in one day like you could when Fed Cup was simply a 3-point match. The solution: 4 separate singles (4 different players) and 1 doubles match; or 3 separate singles and 2 doubles - all played the same day.

    I know some people won't like this because it takes countries out of the mix. But, to me, DC is supposed to decide what country has the "best" tennis. Depth should be part of that. One incredible player (if he also plays doubles), or one incredible player and a good doubles team shouldn't be enough to earn the title of "best tennis country."
     
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  9. Lemmy

    Lemmy New User

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    hope you are joking :p
     
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  10. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    Best thing tennis has and you guys want to turn it into something much different?
    Every other year, i can take.
    Every third or fourth year, even.
    Simultaneous singles matches on two courts, maybe.
    But five matches on one day with a huge roster, rewarding a deep team, penalizing a two or three man squad is just too much of a deviation from dwight davis' vision.

    College tennis is the next best thing to davis cup, and i love it, but you cannot really compare.
    Ohhh, maybe world team tennis format! Sarcasm.

    As mentioned above, it is remarkably successful in most countries. Some countries are even passionate about the Cup. Imagine that.

    I think we have some soul searching to do. It is like we are pointing out the speck in the davis cup's eye without recognizing the plank in our own eye (us tennis).
     
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  11. MCallanan

    MCallanan Rookie

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    Absolutely. I was simply talking in regard to how to increase the popularity in this country. But realistically, at the end of the day the lack of popularity and support in the states has as much to do with the players representing us as it does with the USTA choosing ****** small markets to hold the events.
     
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  12. coolboarder

    coolboarder New User

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    The Davis Cup awards only 500 points and the single matches are bo5. In any major, you need to win 7 matches to gain 2000 points. Here is what I would like to see all Davis Cup matches to offer 2000 points if any player wins 7 Davis Cup matches in a single year with a bonus points if he wins a 8th match. If any player lost a match before his 7th victory would only earn 1000 points. I guarantee you that the top players would participate in the event if they offered this type of points. I feel that a team event is sorely needed to promote as a major event other than the Slams.

    It just needs some kind of adjusted format if this event were to be succeed and viewed as a major event throughout the year.

    The tie would consists of a bo5 singles matches on Wednesday, doubles match on Friday and a reserve singles matches on Sunday if necessary to give the top guy a chance to participate in the doubles with days off in between even in a smaller country a chance to win the tie for the country.

    Here is the points breakdown:

    First round win, 45 points
    First round, second win, 45 points, total: 90 points.
    If a team wins the tie 3-0 or 3-1, dead rubber matches, offers the undefeated player or one loss on a winning team a chance to win more points by winning the bo5 dead rubber match win 45 points and is alive for the chance to win 2000 or 1000 points (a loss) by winning 7 matches. The losing player on a team that is eliminated will be gven chance to win 25 points if he wins a bo5 dead rubber match and to stop the undefeated players the winning team a chance for 2000 points as well. If he fails to win a match, he would be awarded only 10 points for both matches.

    If a player lose the first match but wins the second match and the tie, all of their points will be earned in half of the devalued points for the rest of the year. Any second loss will earn 1/4 of devalued points earned for the rest of the year. Any third loss and his team is alive would earn 1/8 points earned on any live rubber, including undefeated player on a dead rubber match with a bo5 match. If undefeated player on eliminated team would earn 45 bonus points top of his 90 points earned.

    Second round, first win: 90 points, total points, 180 points
    Second round, second win: 90 points, total points, 360 points

    (Dead rubber match, bo5 match if both player with a loss with a chance for eliminated player a chance to earn extra 25 points for the purpose of giving one loss player on a winning team in a tie a chance to earn 1000 points should his team reach the final and any loss in the dead rubber will count toward his final total points in the future rounds 1/4 devalued points, same applies for third round and final round. No dead rubber match taken place for both player with three losses if they meet in the second round or third round. Live rubber with both of the player on both team on third loss will earn 1/8 points in a bo5 match victory.) Again, the undefeated player on a losing team earn 90 bonus points top of his 360 points earned.

    Third round, first win: 360 points, total points, 720 points
    Third round, second win: 360 points, total points, 1080 points with bonus of 120 points for reaching the final even if his team do not make it to the final. Total points: 1200 to both winning player and/or undefeated player on a losing team (live or dead rubber).

    Final round, first win: 800 points. Total points, 2000 points.
    Final round, second win: 500 bonus points, total: 2500 points.

    So in other word, two players on the same team could both earn 2000 points and could earn bonus points in a same year.

    If any player miss the first round tie due to injury, he must earn their way from 45 points and points would increase to each round as a second round value for his third round match and third round value for the final round matches.

    If any player reached the final with a loss on the way must win two live rubber matches in the final round to earn 1000 points (1/2 devalued points) otherwise, he may only earn 200 points for a win in the final round and if a player lost two matches before the final round must win two live rubber final round matches for his 500 points (1/4 devalued points) if he lost two semifinal round matches. He may not earn any 1/4 of the final round points and may only win up to total 500 points if he wins 4 matches with two loss before the final round is being played with two victories in the final round. No dead rubber taken place in the final round. Win one for the county with no points earned for the two-loss player and award 360 points for them regardless of where they lost.

    This is my vision of the Davis Cup format.
     
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  13. MCallanan

    MCallanan Rookie

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    I would certainly be in favor of increasing ATP point distribution for the Davis Cup. That let alone wouldn't change the format but would help in drawing larger names more frequently and potentially put Davis Cup in the spotlight. Having said that, over the last few years the who's who of tennis has competed in the Davis Cup for the most part.

    I think the Davis Cup format is fine and good unless you're looking at it from the American perspective where our fans aren't attending the events and you can only watch it on tennis channel. Those things would change with better marquee American players and hosting the events in larger markets.
     
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