Advantages Public Schools Have Over Private Schools

Discussion in 'College Tennis Talk' started by Kirijax, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. Kirijax

    Kirijax Hall of Fame

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    This has been brought up here and there in other threads but what advantages do public schools have over private schools? Or do they even have an advantage? Of the three biggest winners in college tennis (USC, Stanford, UCLA), two are private schools. Miami has really struggled in getting the top Florida prospects the last few years. The amount of commitment the school has towards athletics and tennis makes a difference of course. But was discussing this with someone else the other day and the general thinking seems to be that the public schools have the advantage because of tuition but I think there is more to it than that. USC and Stanford have been way more successful than any public school. Maybe they have the necessary "channels" and "connections".
     
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  2. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Are you talking in terms of tennis or overall career success?
     
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  3. Kirijax

    Kirijax Hall of Fame

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    Team success.
     
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  4. DaveKB

    DaveKB Rookie

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    In men's tennis with only 4.5 scholarships, the public schools clearly have a financial advantage. It varies of course, but roughly speaking the all in cost at private school is $60K or more and it is about $30K or less for in state students at public schools. Out of state students at public schools run about $50K.

    In general, tennis players and their families are anywhere from "well off" to downright rich, so cost is not a factor for many of them and the quality of the education is paramount as few college players ever earn a living playing pro tennis. If families can afford to pay for their kids junior tennis lessons and cost of traveling to junior tourneys, they can easily afford college even with just a 50% scholarship.

    The three California schools have warm, but not hot weather, with little rain and no snow and until the advent of fancy on campus indoor courts, they had a huge advantage in tennis and probably still do. Florida is warm in the winter, but hot and humid so playing tennis there from May thru October can be brutal. Only an idiot would choose to play outdoor tennis in Miami in June, July,or August and you really have to train year round these days.

    The three California schools, especially Stanford, are known for their strong academics. Other tennis schools have really good academics, but many others are just average. I will not name the average academically speaking schools, but you can find them on the US News and Report listings.

    The deep south has always been football country and right or wrong many people down south view tennis as a "wussy" boy country club sport. I do not not know about the "wussy" aspect these days, but tennis is still mainly a country or tennis club sport and it cost $$ to play there. There are some public courts, but learning to play high level tennis on public courts does not happen very often. In the south "real" men play football.

    The B1G is just too cold to be good at tennis. How OSU does it amazes me. The Big 12 is also mostly cold and windy as well. The ACC in general, including UVA until the early 2000's, did not fully fund the maximum allowable 4.5 scholarships. You cannot win anything with only 2 or 3 men's tennis scholarships.

    I grew up in central Virginia and only a nut job played outdoors and often had to clear the snow off the courts from December through mid March. If you live in the north outdoor tennis is impossible. Many courts had clay surfaces and they froze in the winter. UVA now has indoor courts so it is not a problem. Back in my day it was all outdoor tennis.

    It is not that hard to understand why these California schools have dominated men's tennis. However, with often air conditioned courts everywhere these days, the talent can go anywhere and schools like UVA have managed to capitalize on it with help from a great head coach in Brian Boland.

    These days I do think public schools (UCLA, OSU, UVA, UGA, etc.) have a modest advantage due to lower cost for in state tennis players.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2014
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  5. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    Baylor, Duke, Vanderbilt and Columbia all finished in the top 20 men last year. On the women's top 20 there's a few more private schools than men but they have full scholarships so I'll keep the conversation to the men.

    There's no reason why Miami is not top 20 every year in Men's tennis if the other schools can do it. Not one good reason, but I'll get to that. Each of the 4 top 20 schools has pluses and minuses and cost roughly the same as Miami. We could debate each one in detail, weather, facilities, academics, location, etc. But I just don't see a nickels difference.

    It comes down to recruiting, bottom line, plain and simple.
     
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  6. Clemson_tennis

    Clemson_tennis Legend

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    Yep. I posted in a different thread a couple months ago all of the private schools who are very successful at tennis and how for some of them tennis is the schools most successful sport (Tulsa for one and also Baylor was elite in tennis way back when they were terrible in everything else).

    Like you say facilities make a slight difference but really its the coach and how he or she evaluates talent and and can get the best players possible to come
    in.
     
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  7. Kirijax

    Kirijax Hall of Fame

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    Couldn't agree more. Who recruits better? And once you have them, keep them.
     
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  8. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

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    It's hard to get them to Miami after they visit Waco, Texas. :)
     
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  9. andfor

    andfor Hall of Fame

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    Exactly, what a massive head scratcher. If a player had to pick between the top 4 listed throw in Tulsa and Miami, how the heck could Miami not get top shelf talent every year?
     
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  10. Kirijax

    Kirijax Hall of Fame

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    I find myself asking the same question more frequently every year. I often wonder about how they are using their scholarships there. Questions are asked, none are answered so all we can do is speculate. And then they complain when we make assumptions and guesses. It's a wonderful relationship.
     
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  11. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Baylor is a beautiful college to visit. Sadly, it's location devalues it.
     
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