Advice for my serve?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by sharpy, Jan 3, 2008.

  1. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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  2. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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  3. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    Very true. thank you. this happens to me when i try to hit second serves with spin rather than flat.
     
  4. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    That is actually a really nice serve tecnically. It is smooth and the timing of the racquet acceleration looks to be about right.

    except - Do you ever think of tossing higher - it looks like you are rushing to catch a short toss, especially in the day video. It does not look like your are fully extending at contact.
     
  5. WBF

    WBF Hall of Fame

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    sharpy, your serve looks good to me! You could certainly use a bit more muscle on it though!

    I agree that you are moving a little to the side, but... This isn't necessarily bad. I am not very strong, but I get a hell of a lot of power on my serve with a similar sideways step (mine is a bit more pronounced actually), so I don't think it would hold you back from getting more power...
     
  6. quicken

    quicken Professional

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    You seem to bring down left arm a little too early and you also want to tuck that arm in a little. But then I guess you werent serving at like mach 3 heh.
    And as you were doing the trophy position, you might want to pull that racquet shoudler a little more down to get more speed.
     
  7. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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  8. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Yes yes I have a lot to say, but I'm watching V-tech right now. :D
     
  9. Solat

    Solat Professional

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    you don't drop your racquet enough, your wrist lays back and therefore your racquet appears to drop via wrist rather then via body drive upwards. This will mean you will lack external rotation of the shoulder in the loading of the racquet drive and your serve will lack head speed and no doubt reduced ability to pronate effectively
     
  10. BeHappy

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    solat is the best poster in this section.

    And he's right sharpy
     
  11. BeHappy

    BeHappy Hall of Fame

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    sharpy, you presently do this

    you point your racquet to the ground and leave your hand at head height

    you need to:

    put your hand behind your shoulder, at shoulder height, right behind your shoulder, not your neck.

    Not so much a back scratch as a shoulder scratch.

    Do what I tell you to do and your serve will instantly transform, it will feel almost miraculous.
     
  12. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Going along with what BeHappy is saying, you know your trophy position is right if the hand is about shoulder level rather than at head level. This isn't something you consciously force; it is a reflection that you pivoted correctly.

    As Solat is saying, the pivot motion is off. As he point out, it looks as if you use your wrist to finish raising the racquet into the trophy, laying the wrist back. This takes away the loading of the shoulder prior in your takeback.

    I think the source of the problem is that, in the beginning of your windup, your back shoulder isn't above your front. Before you begin the windup, you want to make sure you're leaning forward, so that the left side of your body is slightly bent whereas the right side is straight. As you take the racquet back, you want to mantain this slightly crooked position (so left shoulder is under right) until you start raising the toss arm and aiming for the sky.

    During your takeback, you really want to just concentrate on moving your back shoulder away from and behind the front. Even when you're raising the tossing arm and looking upwards, you want to keep doing this. This will help influence how much racquet drop you get. Also, in your takeback, you *probably* want the racquet face to open a little toward the net. This puts your shoulder in a more favorable position, so that you can the shoulder farther back.

    If you do this correctly, the combination of back shoulder away from front and of aiming upwards, should automatically pivot the trophy position. And, again, you know if the trophy position is good, if the hand is about shoulder height and behind the right shoulder.

    So, to reiterate . . .

    1) At beginning of windup, are you leaning slightly forward? Is your right side relatively straight and your left side slightly bent? Is your front shoulder below your back shoulder?

    2) During takeback, are you consciously taking your back shoulder away from and behind the front shoulder?

    3) During first half of takeback, is your front shoulder still under your back shoulder? Is the racquet face partially open toward net?

    4) When you initiate the ball toss and look up, are you still taking your back shoulder away from and behind the front shoulder?

    5) To raise the racquet, are you pivoting around your elbow or shoulder, instead of the wrist/hand?

    6) When you set up the trophy, is your hand at shoulder height and behind the right shoulder?

    7) When you initiate the upward swing, are you bringing your back shoulder over and on top of your front shoulder?

    8) Does your body move forward into court rather than sideways? This is usually a sign that your external rotation is correct.
     
  13. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    Yes, I feel if I don't use some wrist to 'finish' into the trophy position, the racket wouldnt be pointed straight up. Instead it would be tilted down to the right if I only relied on an elbow pivot and kept a totally relaxed wrist. (since this happens if you lead w/ elbow using a somewhat abbreviated motion)


    What exactly do you mean take your back shoulder away and further to the right than your left shoulder? Can you still do a elbow pivot if you conciously bring the shoulder muscle back and to the right? When exactly is a good time to start bringing the back shoulder further back? Explain more.
     
  14. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, it's due to a combination of things that you're doing in the beginning. But the main thing is the relative starting height of back shoulder. During your takeback, your back shoulder is below your front shoulder. And so when you aim your sight upwards and set up the trophy, you have to raise or "swing" the elbow upwards (radial deviation.) This leads to the wrist that you're using.

    However, if in your takeback your back shoulder is above your front shoulder, then as you aim your sight upwards, you'll pivot correctly without needing wrist. In fact, it'll be automatic provided that you aim your line of sight upwards.

    Actually it's to the back and to the left. That's how I prefer to look at it -- the takeback is back shoulder stretching away from the front; the upward swing is back shoulder snapping back toward the front. It's easier for me to look at this way, because the actual rotation of a serve is moving in all three planes is actually complex if you try to think it through.

    Another way to look it is you want to apply as much stretch (passively, through the body itself) to your right pec in your takeback. The stretch on the right pec helps to indicate how much load you're applying to the shoulder, and it helps to influence how much racquet drop you'll get. Now, the key thing here is even when you're applying the trophy position, the pec is still being stretched passively. This means that the shoulder is still being loaded, and in turn this also aids in the setting up of the trophy position.
     
  15. Solat

    Solat Professional

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    that is the best thing anyone has ever said about me!

    completely misguided but thanks anyway :p
     
  16. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    When you say back shoulder higher than front do you mean your supposed to purposely lift the right trap muscles a bit, or is it leaning foward a bit with your upper body?

    Wouldnt the shoulder automatically go back and to the left if you did an elbow pivot? Or do you have to do this on purpose?

    I never knew the orientation of back shoulder over front controls the wrist position too....

    By the way thanks so much for your help
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2008
  17. stav_babolat

    stav_babolat Rookie

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    wouldt a better toss help solve that problem as if he tosses the ball straight , hell naturally move sideways to hit it. I do that alot aswell.
     
  18. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Just lean forward a little. As you initiate the windup, you are still leaning a bit so that the front shoulder is a little under. Then you do the rest of the windup as normal. As long as you concentrate on stretching out the right pec, or moving the back shoulder farther away from the front shoulder, then everything else takes care of itself.

    When you initiate the forward swing, it feels a little like you're dunking on the ball. That's a sign that you're experiencing correct rotation.

    Yes, but *also* in your takeback, you should also try to take the shoulder to the left while you take it back. That better tracks the natural motion of the shoulder. Right now, you're taking back in a kind of vertical slot, which limits the takeback and thus the racquet drop.

    It's not a direct cause-effect, but when it's set up as you have it, it leads to incorrect deviation of the arm. This also influences groundstrokes, though in each case differently (i.e. push-pull.)
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2008
  19. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    ^^^
    tricky, do you have any videos of yourself serving or playing you
    can post?
     
  20. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    Last edited: Jan 4, 2008
  21. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    I thought about doing that, to show the role of pronation and supination in the FH stroke. MUCH easier to show it than to write 1000 lines about it!

    Yes. You want to load the back shoulder as much as possible.

    In regards to the tossing arm and raising the hitting arm, that itself is initiated from you shifting your line of sight toward the sky while you are still taking back.

    Orientating the shoulders will help with this . Besides making sure you're not flicking the ball in the air, it also helps to watch the ball toss after your windup has started. In the beginning of the windup, you look at where you want the ball to land. You keep looking at that spot until your hands separate, which is about when the hips have already started turning and the front shoulder is past square with net. Then you track the tossing arm with your head and follow the ball toward the same point in the sky. In terms of your tossing action, if you lead the takeback with the elbow, you also want to toss the ball from the elbow. If you lead the takeback with the shoulder, then you toss the ball from the shoulder.
     
  22. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    Tricky,

    Still having trouble getting a natural trophy/wrist position/racket drop issue.... I;ve tried back shoulder over front/ aiming for sky/....I took another video, let me know what you think. From my point of view, all I accomplished is a more circular windup. I don't know. This part of the serve is extremely hard to master...

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=5kulWTgSaF0
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=7Ja2a0H9oDA

    and if you have a moment have a look at my bh video... you wont be disappointed, like all my strokes, they are so close to the 'next' level...Somehow my back view video got deleted, but it showed how despite using a smile takeback, i got a b/b at contact.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZ47_vyy-6o
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2008
  23. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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  24. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    Others have already given you some good advice. One thing I would recommend is to make sure you point your tossing arm all the way up. You only bring it up about 3/4 of the way.

    Good luck!
     
  25. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    Thank you. You seem to have mastered your own serve. What's your take on getting the racket to drop deeper down that back?
     
  26. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^

    1. The deeper the racquet drop, the more "space" you have to accelerate up to the contact point.

    2. The deeper the racquet drop (if you have your arm pointed straight up), the more torque you are getting. By stretching the muscles in your chest, as a result of having the tossing arm fully extended up, and having the racquet drop to it's maximum, the more speed you are going to obtain by releasing those muscles and uncoling them into the shot.

    In the photo below, you could see my tossing arm is pointing straight up. From the tip of my fingers in my tossing arm to my right elbow you could draw a straight line into the ground. You could also see my chest being stretched.

    [​IMG]

    In this photo sequence, you could see as my tossing arm goes down, it begins to swing to the left (which keeps my chest stretched), as the racquet drops straight down, and then begins it's accelearation up the contact point.

    (sort of like a see-saw)

    [​IMG]

    Good luck. You have a great base to begin with your current serve. A few tweeks here and there, and you will have an awesome serve.
     
  27. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    thanks for the screenshots. I really want to master this serve.. Have a look at my racket drop potential

    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/rckt.jpg

    1st pic is my current drop with an "automatic" drop when i go through the serve motion

    2nd top pic is my maximum shoulder flexibility going through the motion with my hands

    3rd pic bottom is pete sampras's drop
     
  28. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^^Awesome. The second picture is where you want to be. Look how close it is to Sampras'. They are nearly identical. Notice how the tip of the frame is past the butt (nearly reaching the bottom of the shorts). Good stuff.

    It takes time, but you will get there if you continue working on it.

    remember though to keep that tossing arm going all the way up.
     
  29. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    Yea.. right now i only serve at about 80's. Just imagine if I got the racket drop down....I might be able to serve like you!
     
  30. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^^ LOL. Well, you would be surprised how a few tweeks could add mph to your serve. The racquet not completely dropping, coupled with the tossing arm not going all the way up is defintiely robbing you of some mph.

    Keep us posted on how your progress is going. I have to hit the courts again soon. I've been having trouble with my neck and haven't been playing much.

    Anyway, good luck, and like I said, keep us updated on your progress. Thanks for sharing your vid.
     
  31. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    You are currently tucking in the front elbow, but you don't want to do that. The vertical axis of your takeback is a U. The horizontal axis of your takeback will be a straight line, not an arc around the body.

    As a result, as you take back the racquet and rotate the torso, the front elbow will naturally straighten out very early and start moving away from the torso. This is necessary in order for the takeback to mantain a straight line in the horizontal axis.

    Smile pattern is classical; in classical strokes, you do not swing across the body and you do not take the racquet back across the body. It's not that different from a old-fashioned closed stance woodie FH. It's easier to execute if you trace the U with your elbows rather than the shoulders, since the shoulders will make you inclined to swing around the body.

    Yeah, it's the way you're taking the racquet back. You're not really loading the shoulder until you start setting up the trophy, and this is constricting your racquet drop.

    When you initiate the takeback, it's a little bit like a butterfly swim stroke. You want to take the arm laterally, so that the arm crosses well behind your right hip (and racquet tip start pointing yoward left side fence) before you start setting up the trophy.

    Right now, it doesn't look like you're pronating correctly through the ball. BUT, part of that is because you're constricting your shoulder movement instead of letting it fully rotate externally. That itself comes from your takeback being constricted in the horizontal axis. One that might help you is to keep a slight bend around your left rib through the entire serve. This keeps your front shoulder "under" the back even through the toss, and it prevents your back shoulder from trying to windmill dunk on the ball.
     
  32. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    What exactly is the difference between tracing "u" w/ elbow or shoulder? What am I tracing it with currently?

    Tell me more about this straight line/horizontal axis.. I wasnt aware that im arcing the takeback...?
     
  33. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Hmm, it probably makes more sense if you've messed around with a 1H BH or an old-school closed-stance FH.In a "classical" stroke, the idea isn't to maximize your racquet speed but to put weight behind the racquet into the path of the ball.

    If we were looking down at you from a blimp, in a classical crosscourt shot, your forward swing (and even your body) would go back in a straight line from the ball, and then travel in a straight line toward the ball. Once the racquet passes the POC, then it comes around and finishes across the shoulder. That is what we see overhead. Of course, there is also some kind of down-to-up motion with the swing too.

    Right now, you're swinging across your body in the BH. You don't want to do this. Instead of producing that line form and toward the ball, you're swinging across the body, somewhat like a flatter version of a golf swing.

    The smile pattern itself is designed to produce that line. It constricts your shoulder rotation, so that you only forward swing longitiduinally (down to up), not laterally (across the body.) This way, you avoid opening up and your driving arm (and thus your weight transfer) is allowed to extend into the line of the shot.

    However, the smile pattern works when it's traced with the elbows (or the upper arms) and here only in the vertical plane. That is, no matter how much your hips and torso rotate, the U will always be in the same lateral plane. That means that as you take back, the driving/rear elbow will move away from the body, and as you drive through the POC, the elbow will also move away from the body. In both at takeback and through POC, the arm has automatically straightened out due to the elbow having moved away from the body. Alternately, the guiding/front elbow stays fairly tucked until the racquet passes the POC.

    This might help:

    First, using your racquet, imagine that you're tracing a big, big U on an invisible wall with the racquet tip. Your hands to guide the takeback and forward racquet. Notice how, as your body rotates toward and away from the wall, one of your arms will straighten, and the other will bend. Notice how your elbows move relative to your body.

    Next, concentrate on keeping the back shoulder above the front shoulder through the whole U. You'll find that if you keep the left side of your body straight, and the right side slightly bent around the right rib, this will be easier.

    Finally try tracing the U with the elbows, now trying to make the elbows move in a straight line toward the ball. Your stroke will look much abbreviated, and you might see "wristness" or a SSC between the takeback and forward swing. If you don't, you might be swinging around the body.

    There are a lot of words, but really you're *THIS* close to getting the BH pattern down!
     
  34. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    Ok.

    "When you initiate the takeback, it's a little bit like a butterfly swim stroke. You want to take the arm laterally, so that the arm crosses well behind your right hip"
    Is this something done before you even start to raise your arm? If so, I might already be doing this
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=7Ja2a0H9oDA&feature=user

    What I did notice from the backview is that the trophy position looks awkward and the wrist position too.
     
  35. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, in the trophy position, the right hand should be near and about the same level as the right shoulder. There's a couple of reasons why . . .

    1) I'm not sure whether you're probably orienting upwards as you set up the trophy position. Will has a good video of this over at his fuzzy site, where he throws his racquet straight up in the air.

    In order to do that, it's not just your head is looking at the highest point in the sky, but that your whole body twists upwards to make this happen. It's that twisting action that helps to facilitate the high ball toss, the big knee drop, and it's also what actually sets up the trophy.

    If you leave this segment out, then theoretically your racquet would stay low, your knees should only be slightly bent, and the the tossing arm doesn't get up above the shoulder. In other words, you would be set up to hit the ball as if it was a "smash forehand." It is this whole body turning toward the sky that sets up all those above elements, and in the meantime, all your back arm should do is to concentrate on taking the racquet further back.

    2) In your arm takeback, for now, try pointing your racquet tip between the right side fence and the ground, with the racquet face opening up. In other words a little bit higher than what you're doing now and not so much toward the ground.
     
  36. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    I did notice guys like federer have a fairly high trophy position about head level?
     
  37. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    That's a really good point. The trophy with hand at roughly shoulder-level is calibrated against a continental grip. Federer's grip is between Eastern BH and continental. As the hand moves toward an Eastern backhand grip, the hand will be higher.
     
  38. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    So, me using a continental does that mean something is wrong (trophy at head height?)
     
  39. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    In your case, it's related to how you're setting up the trophy position. The trophy position is set up partially by your body re-orienting for a upward swing. Not as much from raising up your arm up and away from the body. That's part of it, but most of it really is from twisting the body so that you can "throw the racquet upwards." This is more apparent if you try the sock exercise.
     
  40. BeHappy

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    Just a suggestion, maybe you should just tell sharpy what to do without explaining, it seems to me it's the explanations which are confusing sharpy, why not just write a paragraph detailing what he should work on next time he serves?
     
  41. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    I kinda know what you mean w/ thinking of 'throwing upwards' (which would cause alot more lateral lean), though its a little strange that this can also orient the trophy correctly... Would this fix the wrist pos. as well?
     
  42. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    haha.. gorilla you always save my day:lol:
     
  43. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    It helps, but you need to make sure you fixed the issue with the takeback. That's been the source of your headaches with this thread! :D

    In your takeback, your hand should be able to eventually reach the same height as when you started letting of the racquet, just by taking it back and not by self-consciously lifting it. Just work on just that part, turning your hips back and letting the arm go back.

    If you have that, then yeah just by oriented your body toward the sky, the trophy position will be initiated on its own accord.

    I think after you seem to have a reasonably visual sense of this stuff, we'll just re-summarize into another checklist.
     
  44. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    Yea. We're probably talking about something pretty simple here..

    Sorry to bother, but could you reinstate the "takeback issue?"/solution I think thoughout this essay you have written, we're all over the place:)
     
  45. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Right now, your takeback is not lateral -- it's almost all longtiduinal (like a windmill.)

    As you take the racquet back, it helps to have . . .

    1) Racquet tip pointing between ground and right side fence through most of takeback
    2) Racquet face open up a little toward the net through most of takeback
    3) Emphasize the shoulder turn. Back shoulder away from front shoulder. Stretch in the right pec
    4) Racquet eventually finishing with it pointing toward the back fence and left side fence

    Other things to make sure . . .

    1) Front shoulder under back shoulder. Mantaining a slight bend in the left/front rib through all stroke helps with that
    2) Body and field-of-vision turning upwards toward the sky helps set up the ball toss, trophy position, and knee drop

    Things are good when . . .

    1) Trophy position for continental grip should be set so that hand is roughly at right shoulder level and behind shoulder
    2) Tossing arm should be in a high position
    3) Automatic and deep racquet drop
    4) You're hitting 140+
     
  46. BeHappy

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    see what I mean?
    lol ;)
     
  47. sharpy

    sharpy Banned

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    tricky,

    tell me where the differences lie

    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/1.jpg
    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/2.jpg
    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/3.jpg
    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/4.jpg
    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/5.jpg
     
  48. Solat

    Solat Professional

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    [​IMG]
    apart from all the talk about your take back it should also be noted you do not extend your front hip enough to help lower your right hip. The hip drive (and subsequent shoulder and elbow) upward is what pushes against the racquet causing it to drop lower. If you look at this pic you can see how level your hips are compared to Sampras. By not having rear hip drive you do not push your right side of the body up enough which means your racquet will just "hang" in limbo at the top of your serve as you currently do.

    the better the upward drive, the better the related racquet drop. It's great to see someone put in as much effort for self improvement as you are Sharpy, good luck.
     
  49. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    Oh I see -- you're modeling after Sampras's "whip it! whip it good!" style.

    BTW, it's really nice that you did this. Makes it easier to see things . . .

    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/1.jpg
    1) Not sure if if you're hunching your right trap, but don't do that if you are.

    2) At this point, you want to still be looking at where you want to hit the ball, NOT at your toss arm. See the top right picture as a reference. This will prevent your torso from rotating too early.

    3) This is not obvious in the two pictures, but Sampras starts twisting his body to "aim for the sky" when the tossing arm has reached shoulder level. So the initiation of his takeback, the tossing arm crossing the shoulder, and the tracking or watching of the tossing arm occur simultaneously.

    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/2.jpg
    1) You want to start tracking (i.e. watching) your toss arm roughly when the toss arm reaches shoulder level. Before that, you want to keep looking in the direction that you want to hit the ball. You can see Sampras do this in the top right and bottom picture; he doesn't start looking at his toss arm until he's reached shoulder level.

    2) Looking at your wrist position, it looks you're doing a "lat raise" in your back. In other words, you're lifting upwards from the elbow for your takeback. Not a good idea.

    3) Sampras is a unique cat in that he doesn't really start his takeback until when he starts tracking the tossing arm. And, remember, he doesn't start tracking his tossing arm until the arm has roughly crossed shoulder level. So the hitting arm is well, well behind the tossing arm. This of course differs with your takeback, which is synced with your tossing arm.

    4) In the bottom picture, Sampras lets his hip rotation gently nudge the elbow toward the left side fence, while keeping the front shoulder below the back shoulder. To keep the latter, all you got to do is keep the slight bend around your left rib through the entire stroke. Never let that open up as you aim upwards. Never lift from your riight trap. This will also help you from "lat raising" in your takeback.

    5) Sampras's takeback is interesting in that after this slight "nudge", pretty much he lets his arm kinda "go along" for the ride with his body. In other words, once he "starts" the arm of his takeback, everything that comes after that -- takeback, trophy position, racket drop, and upward swing -- is natural product of body rotation, body twisting to aim for the sky, tracking the ball with his head, and keeping the front and back shoulders properly calibrated.

    6) The turning of your body upwards enables the trophy position to be set, but because Sampras's takeback starts so late, it doesn't happen until he has already initiated the "upward stage" of the stroke. By doing this, it lets him use his body to really "whip" his arm through the entire movement for a lot of power, just like most people do with their forehands.

    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/3.jpg
    1) As you can see, because you're "lat raising" or "lifting" with your takeback, your wrist is flexed inward and your hand is "hanging" below your arm. And of course this leads to the wrist action you do to set the trophy. Contrast with the bottom of Sampras, whose hand is line with the hitting arm. This is what should happen in a correct takeback.

    2) Notice, in the bottom picture, how his hips have twisted upwards, so that his whole body is tilted upwards. He's in the middle of setting up his trophy position passively.

    3) Notice, in the bottom picture, how the elbow of his tossing arm at maximal height, does not get closer to his head. This is because he keeps that slight bend in his left rib (thus keeping the shoulder properly calibrated -- hard to verify when the person's shoulder axis gets twisted around like this.

    4) Notice, in the bottom picture, how his left shoulder is pointed more or less in the direction of where the ball will be. Whereas in your picture, the left shoulder is pointing toward the right side fence. This is again, because he doesn't track the toss arm until the arm has crossed the shoulder.

    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/4.jpg
    1) Sampras's trophy position is almost set. Notice hand is about level with shoulder. Notice wrist aligned with hitting arm. Notice In your picture, your hand is still below the hitting arm, and thus you are starting to "wrist" it.

    2) Look at how his line of sight is, and how his whole body is oriented toward that line of sight.

    3) Look at how his knees are further along in bent position than yours. This is tied into his whole body being oriented toward the sky.

    http://www.geocities.com/mastamoda/5.jpg
    1) The trophy position. Hand at right shoulder level. Hand behind the right shoulder.

    2) Look at the orientation of his body and how high the line of sight. Look at how his head and the upper arm are parallel to his line of sight.

    3) Notice how because of that orientation, he's not only dropping considerably, but his back foot is now starting to come in.
     
  50. BeHappy

    BeHappy Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2007
    Messages:
    4,789
    He's right sharpy, don't ignore this as you have everyone elses advice.BTW, your hip extends if you are leaning into the court as you bend your knees, or to put it another way, bend your knees by leaning into the court.

    It's also important that you point your arm straight up into the sky, this sets the angle/axis that your shoulders rotate at.The more vertical the axis, the lower your racquet will drop.Look at Sampras, his arm points straight up to the sky.Another thing is that your ball tossing arm which points upward to the sky must be in line with your shoulders, like this:

    [​IMG]

    which also ensures that your weight moves forward rather than up when your legs uncoil.


    PS: maybe you should try using pictures tricky? more than a thousand words... ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2008

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