Advice from the board

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by merlebo02, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. merlebo02

    merlebo02 Rookie

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    Im 33 years old and have just recently got serious about my health/fitness/ and tennis. I played junior college tennis about 10 years ago, got burned out afterwards and quit for about 5 years. In that period I put on some weight getting up to 255 lb. I started back with tennis 1 year ago and my weight loss back in February. Currently I'm back at 215 lb (lost 40 lbs). I'd like to get down to 200 but everyone tells me NO that I will look anorexic. I am 5'10" but stocky built, I played middle line backer in football. So with this background my question is that I feel bad, I feel weak like I have no energy and my muscles ache. I dont think my problem is diet because I'm stuck at 215 lb; I haven't lost anymore weight in about 2 months. I exercise 5 days a week; usually interval training over 2 miles with app 21 intervals built in hill sprints with ab work-outs afterward 3 days a week, and 2mile jog with upper body work-outs 2 days a week. I also play tennis 2-3 days a week on top of my exercising. Do you guys think I am over doing it or is my diet not what it should be? Should I start having a recovery drink after exercising? I feel guilty if I'm not exercising and fear I would gain weight so i work out daily, should I take some recovery days in the week?
     
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  2. F. Perry

    F. Perry Banned

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    Congratulations on your success. It sound to me though like you might be overdoing it. That is a pretty ambitious schedule. I suggest you take it easy for a few days and see if you feel better; if that doesn't work, I would speak to a doctor.

    You don't say anything about your diet. The exercising will put you in good shape, but you have to diet as well in order to lose weight (obviously). It seems to me one of the problems with such a rigorous routine is that it may make your body crave food, protein especially. If one of your goals is to lose weight, you might try backing off on the exercise and get your weight down through dieting. For myself, when I'm exercising a lot, I have to make sure I'm not overeating out of a mistaken notion that I'm burning off a lot of calories. Anyway just a thought. It sounds like you're doing great so don't be too hard on yourself.
     
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  3. merlebo02

    merlebo02 Rookie

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    My diet is pretty generic in that I try and stay under 1800 cal day, avoid fried foods and only eat red meats twice a week. Trying to eat more fruits, vegetables, and fish. I think I would benefit from a protein shake but I don't know much about them and really don't want to add the extra calories. I guess it's a fine line between maintaining/losing weight and your calorie intake. I'd like to continue to lose about 15 more pounds, which means cutting calorie but I also want to feel good which means getting enough calories!!
     
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  4. Bowtiesarecool

    Bowtiesarecool Rookie

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    I think you're probably doing too much. On the days you play tennis, try simple calisthenics in the morning to wake yourself up and that's it. Also, If you've reached your goal weight, you can stop dieting. You sound like you're a pretty healthy guy. You should be able to eat whatever you want, using moderation to control your weight. If you find you're still feeling tired after cutting back on the workouts, most likely there is something very wrong with your diet. Usually that's someone who is cutting out too much of ANY of the big three, (carbs, fat, and protein are all equally important to te body).
     
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  5. Bowtiesarecool

    Bowtiesarecool Rookie

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    Go online and find a resting metabolic rate calculator to give you a good idea of how many calories you need to maintain your weight. Then on days you excersize/play tennis, add 500-1000. If you're sill trying to lose weight, that's fine. Figure out how much time you are comfortable with taking to lose the weight. The longer you take, the less you need to cut. Keep in mind that you're going to burn more calories long after you're done working out.

    Avoid protein shakes to just maintain energy/weight. Drinking your nutrients is only good if you need them in a hurry. Salads with a little protein and fat mixed in will give you those nutrients in a way that lets your body take it's time to absorb them, which is better for you.

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/ Is an incredible tool for monitoring your intake.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2012
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  6. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    You weigh 215, exercise as stated in the OP, and each fewer than 1,800 calories a day?

    Seriously?
     
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  7. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    I was about to ask whether the OP is actually weighing the food and getting accurate calorie counts or guessing. People who guess are often out by about 50%.
     
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  8. ruerooo

    ruerooo Legend

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    1800 calories and you're doing that much activity?

    I'd say right off the bat you need to eat more (and yes, you're right about the protein, and it really wouldn't be as many extra calories as you think).

    Also, did you know that if you are working out hard and you don't get enough calories, your body actually fights harder to hold on to the excess weight? There are all sorts of physiological things the body does that aren't generally in the popular press about weight loss. You really have to either dig for the information and/or get an expert to help you.

    Do you belong to a fitness club with a certified nutritionist on staff? He or she could work with you to put together a nutritional program that supports all your activity, so you're not exhausted all the time, and still not add unnecessary weight.

    After all, that's what the pros do. :)

    Best of luck, and congratulations on your success to date!
     
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  9. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    You are overdoing it.

    You and your muscles need a break.


    "Overtraining Syndrome

    Overtraining syndrome has been defined as
    “a condition of fatigue and underperformance,
    often associated with frequent infections
    and depression which occurs following hard
    training and competition. The symptoms do
    not resolve despite two weeks of adequate
    rest and there is no other identifiable cause.”
    Overtraining syndrome is the endpoint of
    planned overreaching and inadequate recovery.

    If overtraining syndrome is not treated with
    appropriate rest, a more severe condition––
    chronic fatigue syndrome
    –may develop
    chronic fatigue syndrome has similar
    symptoms to overtraining syndrome, except
    that the symptoms must be present for more
    than 6 months. It includes fatigue that is not
    alleviated by rest, leading to severe decrease
    in work, education or personal activities
    plus at least four of the following symptoms:
    impaired memory or concentration; multijoint
    pain; sore throat; new headaches; tender
    cervical or axillary lymph nodes; unrefreshing sleep; muscle pain; post exertional malaise. It has been estimated that as much
    as 20% of all elite athletes will be affected by
    overtraining syndrome.
    "
    - http://assets.usta.com/assets/1/dps...ence/RECOVERY PROJECT 22410 EMAIL VERSION.pdf
     
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  10. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    After some rest, you need to learn about Periodization:

    Periodization is the cyclical pattern of
    alternating progressive training loads with
    appropriate recovery to improve an athlete’s
    performance. The focus on improved training
    has led to great increases in performance,
    yet without appropriate focus on recovery,
    athletes will never reach their potential
    which could result in minor and major
    negative consequences such as injury,
    apathy and burnout."
    - http://assets.usta.com/assets/1/dps...ence/RECOVERY PROJECT 22410 EMAIL VERSION.pdf


    Your muscles can't train for maximum strength, conditioning and speed at the same time.

    You will have to concentrate on strength, cardiovascular conditioning or speed for a period of time, then move on to the next cycle.

    You can't train maximally for any of these endpoints and not have adequate nutrition.

    The following book is the single best source I have found to review all of the multiple aspects of training for tennis:
    Tennis Training: Enhancing On-court Performance [Paperback]
    Mark Kovacs PhD (Author), W. Britt Chandler MS (Author), T. Jeff Chandler EdD (Author) http://www.amazon.com/Tennis-Traini...id=1347984537&sr=1-2&keywords=tennis+training

    The following is the best book for specific training cycles during each period training, even though it does not contain as much background explanation as the above book:
    Power Tennis Training [Paperback] by Donald A. Chu http://www.amazon.com/Power-Tennis-...id=1347984537&sr=1-7&keywords=tennis+training


    Good luck!

    Hope you feel better.
     
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