Advice on the Recruiting Process

Discussion in 'College Tennis Talk' started by tennisbuck, Nov 27, 2013.

  1. tennisbuck

    tennisbuck Professional

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    Hello I am a sophomore in high school and I'm starting to look into colleges. I have a top 10 usta sectional 16 and under rank and think i could play d1 or d2 somewhere. What do I need to be doing now as far as communicating with college coaches and stuff like that? I have read about the process some but I'm confused about a lot of things. I just don't want to be late on something and miss out on an opportunity.
    So my main questions are: What should I be doing now as a sophomore to play college tennis and possibly get a scholarship? How do some juniors commit so early and others later? Any other information on the process would be appreciated.
     
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  2. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    All coach's email can be easily found on their college website. Start the process by introducing yourself as you did here. Mention your grades, today's goals and your tennis accomplishments. If interested in d1d2 you're not too early.

    Virtually all are eager to help you through the process and will readily follow up.
     
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  3. tennisbuck

    tennisbuck Professional

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    Thanks I will try to email my top choices coaches soon.
     
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  4. jaggy

    jaggy G.O.A.T.

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    If you have the money then a summer camp at a college where you think you could play will help you.
     
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  5. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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  6. BirdieLane

    BirdieLane New User

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    Your timing is near perfect for D1/D2. You will want to get on their radar early summer.

    Select at least 10 schools you are interested in and email the coaches. The email should be all quality (negative points for quantity). Put your name in the subject line.

    The best advice I got is this: Write a first sentence that nobody else can. (and keep this mind for college apps, job apps, etc..:) )

    Round out first paragraph by mentioning TRN or USTA rank and maybe a good recent result. Next give them a schedule of tournaments that you will be playing should they be able to watch you. Add a short paragraph at end noting your academics, sportsmanship awards or other info showing you are a solid citizen. Would also be good to mention team experiences (in tennis or other sports). But again, assume they have a very short attention span while reading email so hook them and give them just essentials.

    Close with a little info that personalizes the email a bit (reference their conference or someone you know who plays/played for team or their school mascot...). Include your coaches name and phone/email who they can contact - because they can call the coach but they cannot call you or return calls. Sign off by saying you will call/contact them in the Fall to see if they think you'd be a fit and if they have interest.

    Target this intro email for early summer when they are thinking more about recruiting vs now or spring as they are in middle of their dual season. When you call them in the fall, email them a time that you will call a day or two in advance. If you get answering machine, again, leave a time you will call back on your message. Remember, they can't return any calls or emails. I'd say if they don't pick up phone after two or three tries (when they knew you'd call) or try and contact your coach after you've called them, then they aren't interested.

    Lastly, believe me, an interested college coach watching WILL notice sportsmanship, mental and emotional composure, fighting spirit, grinding in backdraw, seeing how you interact with opponents and how you get along with players while hanging at the site. This and proven team expirence may be the 'tiebreaker' when considering similar abilities vs other potential recruits.

    (and to goran's point....yes, this is from experience...)
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2013
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  7. tennisbuck

    tennisbuck Professional

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    Thank you for your detailed response
     
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  8. BirdieLane

    BirdieLane New User

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    On your commit question: Any commitment by you to a college or a college to you before you sign a National Letter of Intent (on Signing Day your senior year) is just a 'verbal' commitment. And a verbal commitment is just a handshake deal...i.e. non-binding and backed only by good faith on both sides.

    'Early' commits are just verbals. And in these cases the athlete initiates all contact with the coaches because the coaches cannot initiate or even call them back until after the athletes junior year.

    Good luck.
     
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  9. tennisbuck

    tennisbuck Professional

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    Thanks. So from my understanding then the NLI can't be signed till senior year?
     
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  10. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    OP, take a look at the links I included in my reply. Not just your senior year, but there are specific signing periods during your senior year.
     
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  11. tennisbuck

    tennisbuck Professional

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  12. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    In general, yes. However, there are a small number of d1/d2 schools that aren't in the NLI program so it's possible you might see some quirk.
     
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  13. mrpeterman

    mrpeterman Banned

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    Perhaps this well help you.

    The competition for scholarships is not between you and the other 300 players who are trying to get one. Most of those kids have no chance.. so you're only competing against a very small group of really good players. You're chances of securing a scholarship are much better than you realize, assuming you are a one of the really good players.

    The schools are looking for great players, the great players are looking for schools.. Let them know you are out there and if you are good enough you will get a scholarship.

    The vast majority of players will not get a scholarship because they are not good enough. The majority of players who are good enough will get a scholarship if they make enough noise.
     
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  14. tball2day

    tball2day Semi-Pro

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    ............................
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
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