Agassi book readers? I need to share my dissapointment with somebody!!

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by Oldracquet27, May 10, 2010.

  1. Oldracquet27

    Oldracquet27 Rookie

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    I just finished it!, The book is very interesting and engaging, maybe interesting because of the fact that Agassi shows a person that maybe none of us did know...

    1-) How he constantly attacks and puts down a lot of players!, especially Pete Sampras, his bitterness againgst Sampras is outrageous!, who does he think he is?

    2-)How The hell somebody that walked out of the court at almost 40 years old and just because his body could not take more, can say that he HATES tennis, what is he trying to accomplish , to sell more books? If is not the case, he needs a therapist to help him to find out what it is that he hated in his life, as per the book, a lot of things might be, many none his fault though....
    The guy trained like a warrior, loved to hit tennis balls and WIN, hired the best people to help him to go to the top!, athletes that get to the top of the sport like that need to absolutely be IN LOVE with what they do, otherwise there is no way they can make it, he could have walk away when he was a teen and was not under his father supervision and never did, so don't give me that crap that you hate the sport. Actually is very contradictory how he talks about his game and later says that he hates it. WHAT A DISRESPECT TO ALL THE FELLOW PLAYERS , AND BAD MESSAGE TO TENNIS LOVERS, AND KIDS WHO ARE WORKING TO GET TO THE PRO TOUR.

    3-)The Agassi image i had before this book is totally different now, the guy is just an idiot kid.

    Sorry , i had to get this out of my chest, What do you think people?
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2010
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  2. ace58

    ace58 New User

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    Ive heard alot tennis pros talking about them being forced to play from a young age and disliking it, I don't understand why people get so offended when agassi goes a step further and says he flat out hates it. if your trying to exel at any profesion their is someone who already has that doesn't like what they are doing because they where forced into it or wanted to do something else but they couldn't for what ever reason. Heck with your logic I can easily say that 30 year olds that work at mcdonalds and hate their jobs are being disrecpectful to millions of poor people in 3rd world countries that would love haveing that job.
     
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  3. thejackal

    thejackal Hall of Fame

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    musical or theatrical prodigies who get pushed into it as kids turn out much worse and much more bitter than Andre. read the book, loved it and don't think any less of him. in fact it must've been very cathartic for him, so Im happy he's finally able to get it off his chest.
     
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  4. Oldracquet27

    Oldracquet27 Rookie

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    :confused:
     
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  5. robow7

    robow7 Professional

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    I read the book and found it very informative and interesting but...... I found I didn't care for Agassi the person any more (and probably less) than I did before.
     
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  6. egn

    egn Hall of Fame

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    I am almost done with it and as much as I hated it at points I like it. If Andre Agassi wasn't a real person the story would of course be better but in a way Andre was just telling all. This is me. I don't care. So at least for that much I appreciate it, and it was an interesting read. The part about Brad Gilbert was great. A lot of the book I liked.
     
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  7. Pwned

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    Read it. Great book. But the overall tone of the book was very negative.
     
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  8. FD3S

    FD3S Professional

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    He did seem to hate the sport for a long time (personally, I also got the feeling that he hated the fact that due to the training that was forced on him, he was literally qualified for nothing else in the grand scheme of things. Such is the reality of being a ninth grade dropout). However... well, the quote on the page right before chapter 21 starts sums it up:

    "So what if you hate tennis? Who cares? All those people out there, all those millions who hate what they do for a living, they do it anyway. Maybe doing what you hate, doing it well and cheerfully, is the point. So you hate tennis. Hate it all you want. You still need to respect it - and yourself."

    I think he learned that respect in the second half of his career (barring the meth lie, which was undoubtedly a dick move), and it at least diluted the hatred, somewhat. He seemed to genuinely enjoy hitting with Graf at the end, anyway.
     
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  9. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    I completely understand why he says he "hates" tennis.

    But yes, I lost a lot of respect for him as a person...if you think past the entertaining, and engrossing writing, you do start to see the incredible hypocrisy of his judgments and many of his attitudes.

    Their are also many little "fudges" and "white lies" and glossing over of significant incidents. We did have an extensive thread about that. So, definitely he did a fair amount of history rewriting.
     
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  10. Puma

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    Sadly, watching him in that match with Sampras, Fed and Nadal, is very enlightening in regards to his mindset about Sampras.

    What a classless thing to do. In front of a crowd no less!
     
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  11. subban

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    I really think he hates Tennis. But the fact is he probably likes money and being famous even more than he hates tennis. It was probably too much money, girls and fame to give up as a teenager. This kid was featured on magazines and dating famous models as a 16 year old with his whole Rebel is Everything marketing scheme. How do you give that up, even if you hate playing tennis, at least winning keeps the gravy train going for you.
     
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  12. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    I haven't read the book; don't plan to.

    I love tennis, so hearing someone announce that he hates tennis is at best too bad, or worse kinda pathetic.

    Never cared much for Mr. "Image is Everything" as a player or personality.

    Even less now after his "carthartic revelations."
     
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  13. Bhagi Katbamna

    Bhagi Katbamna Hall of Fame

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    In a search for more book sales and more money(from the book sales), Agassi trashed his own image as an Ambassador and an elder Statesman for the sport of tennis.

    Usually, tell-all type books are written by hangers-on and friends rather than the person themselves. I was amazed that Agassi did this to himself.
     
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  14. Dedans Penthouse

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    Informative comments above. AA sounds like a b.s. artist with a little bit of 'greasy hustler' in him what with his self-serving spinning and such.

    That said, are there any "fun reads" in the book, e.g. anything from the "Zen Master" about what it was like banging Barbara Streisand?
     
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  15. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

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    I couldnt put the book down. I read it in two days.I enjoyed it.
     
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  16. TennisBeginner

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    Great book, the best I've read in my opinion. Also he doesn't actually hate tennis,the book shows how he grows to love it so much. He says so many times he wants to quit but he can't, why? Because he loves it too much. Anyways great book overall, highly recommended.
     
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  17. Joe Pike

    Joe Pike Banned

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    My Agassi image I had before also has changed.
    The guy is simply admirable!
     
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  18. Joe Pike

    Joe Pike Banned

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    Yes, he said it for all to hear (and read) when Graf wanted to stop:

    I want to play just a little while longer.
     
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  19. Joe Pike

    Joe Pike Banned

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    To the contrary, he enhanced this image.
     
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  20. Big Dave

    Big Dave New User

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    I read the book in a couple of days and thought it was a great book. It gave alot of insights. I feel as though Andre hated tennis intially because it was forced on him, but he's grown to appreciate it as the years have gone on. I highly reccommend the book. I don't think any less of him.

    He's a pretty good guy, and a great statesman for the sport. Sure he took Meth, he made a mistake, owned up to it (much later :) ) and moved on. He's contributed so much to charity and philanthropic efforts, the guy is a class act.

    I don't put much weight on what happened in Haiti...i think the whole thing is majorly blown outta proportion...and i also feel like Pete was as much to blame as Andre was.....anyways...

    ...the book is great.
     
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  21. HunterST

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    WHOA WHOA WHOA WHOA

    Anyone saying the tone of the book is negative, or that Agassi has a mean spirited attitude towards players has VERY limited skills in the area of literary interpretation.

    The whole point of the book is that from negativity, Agassi found meaning. He did not choose tennis, fell into drug use, and had a general displeasure with his life. However, once Andre became determined to live is life better, he began enjoying tennis, met his wife who gave him beautiful children, and established his proudest achievement, his school.

    Any negative statements towards players or other figures is merely meant to better portray Agassi's actual emotions. How "open" would he be if he said he deeply cared for and respected every individual in his life?

    The book deals with tough topics, and portrays them realistically. Naturally, some of the areas of Agassi's life were negative. However, do not mistake these things for the book's theme.
     
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  22. Fumus

    Fumus New User

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    The reason why the book could be viewed as negative is because Agassi is really introspective and sensitive. He had huge highs and low lows. For Andre, he stated this in the book, that winning never felt as good as losing did bad. So a lot of the time he spends on talking about things are his disappointments.

    I think most tennis players can understand hating tennis and not wanting to play it anymore. Surely I've felt that way after a demoralizing loss, especially against a rival. If you haven't had that feeling that I guess you could understand.

    Andre hated tennis because it was forced upon him some best chapters of the book, the earliest chapters detail this. It's very easy to understand why Andre felt the way he did. Also, when he first meets Stephanie in the book. He tells her "his big secret", Andre waits for a shocking response instead she just gives him a look like "doesn't everyone".

    Agassi learns to accept his life but I don't think he every really likes tennis until he retires. Up until then, it was his job.

    Overall, it was incredibly well written and for the most part each chapter was a nice mix of comedy, sadness, and sometimes triumph. I didn't really like hearing about Agassi's relationships...women or otherwise. Also he withheld a lot of information about his partying, escapades with women, etc. I wouldn't mind reading about some of that stuff. I know he was/is a drinker...he sorta mentions it in the book but I wondered to what extent Andre drank. At one point Gil tells him he'll have to cut back on the alcohol....

    Also aside from a handful of matches, Andre didn't really talk about the matches, the points, his strategies. I would have liked to read about this as well. Perhaps he will in another book.

    Agassi played some classic matches.
     
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  23. Bhagi Katbamna

    Bhagi Katbamna Hall of Fame

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    Not for a lot of people.
    I'm talking about where he blamed his trainer for being caught with meth in a drug test. Does that seriously make him more admirable to anyone?
     
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  24. jswinf

    jswinf Professional

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    HunterST has a good post a few up.

    Several posters are saying "It was a good, enjoyable book, but learning things about Agassi makes me dislike him" and such.

    So if Andre, who is who he is, had put out a nice "sanitized" autobiography you'd respect him more? Give him credit for more honesty than most celeb books.
     
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  25. Pwned

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    95% of the book was negative in vibe. I don't care if the last 5% he found himself and turned into the faux happy-go lucky person he is today.
     
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  26. Bhagi Katbamna

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    Why did he even write one? He had a choice to make as to what to put in there and taking down other players or talking about his drug use makes him seem small minded.
     
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  27. HunterST

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    Negative is a deceptive word there. It implies that there is an overall pessimistic point of view. On the contrary, the book is quite optimistic. Conflicted would be a better word.

    Agassi certainly was faced with a lot of conflicts in his early life, and that is reflected in the book. Even though the book illustrates these conflicts, however, many joyful aspects of his life are presented throughout the book. Agassi constantly describes the support and love he receives from the people in his life.

    The negative aspects of his life are not presented to communcate a negative theme. They are simply necessary to illustrate Agassi's transformation, as well as the transformation all people can make.
     
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  28. TennisBeginner

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    There you go Hunter, at least someone understands the meaning of the book ;)
     
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  29. HunterST

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    Ridiculous. From your comment, I suspect you have not read the book (I don't mean that in a combative or condescending way)

    If you haven't, I really think you should read the book and you'll think differently about it.

    Someone accurately depicting their experiences and emotions as well as some of the most difficult times in their life (drug use) does not AT ALL make them small minded. Quite the opposite in fact.
     
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  30. Bhagi Katbamna

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    No offence taken. I haven't read the book. But I have read the excerpts regarding the drug use. I should have made myself more clear above. It isn't the drug use itself that makes him seem small minded, it is the fact that he blamed his trainer.
     
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  31. Pwned

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    . .
     
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  32. hfmf

    hfmf New User

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    I liked reading the Agassi book, and I think that hearing his attitude about playing helped me sympathize with him more. There isn't a match that I've gone through where I didn't hate the game of tennis for a shot or two. Usually I hate tennis for at least a whole game during a set. Yet, despite the fact that he hated to do it, he DID it, and he did it until his body was torn to shreds. He did that because he knew he had found his calling and his talent would be best used on the court.

    As for the talking about other players, do YOU like everyone you play against? Just because they were tossed in the same professional sport circuit doesn't mean they have to call each other daily and be best friends. You're allowed to make observations about your surroundings when you write a memoir, as a matter of fact, if you don't do it, it's a boring read.

    All in all, Agassi seemed like a guy who was apologizing for his early image is everything self in this book. He didn't write about his drug use and coverup and blame anyone else. He took the hard rap and didn't pull any punches. I appreciated that. I loved the last chapters where he spoke about how his philanthropy has helped him as a person, even as he's helped poorer kids who, if not for his money and time, would be aimless or dead. I did NOT like how he came across as a bit of a drama queen. Every time there was an issue in Agassi land, it was time to assemble the support team! I would hate to be a part of his inner circle. Every other day, it would be... "HELP! My toenail is too ragged! I'll let you drive my corvette if you'll listen to me whine!"

    Anyways. I still think that the book is a great read, and it didn't soil my image of agassi at all. It was pretty much what I expected, a deep and thoughtful reflection on a career I had a lot of questions about. If he had not included any of the subjects that bristled most of the posters on this thread, I would have been bored reading it, and he would have been being untrue to his character, in my opinion.
     
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  33. pjonesy

    pjonesy Professional

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    The book was not particularly well written and although Agassi was self deprecating, he seemed to be a little too at ease with his past transgressions. I'm also not sure about some of his comments on Sampras, Chang and Courier. Its almost as if he does not want to include himself with the greatest American tennis generation. We get a very clear picture of Agassi's resentment towards his father, but get no sense of closure at the end of the book. There certainly are some shocking, sensational moments in the book, but the structure was too loose to integrate them into the book in a way that would be cohesive. It seemed as if his insecurities were addressed but not confronted in a way that would give a life lesson to the reader. Agassi's book left me with more questions than answers, but at this point I do not desire to read part 2 (if there is one).
     
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  34. For those saying the book is not negative...I'm sorry but he throws a bunch of people under the bus. Period. He makes no apologies for doing so as well.

    If you don't like someone, it doesn't give you the right to tear them down.
     
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  35. Dedans Penthouse

    Dedans Penthouse Hall of Fame

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    Above posts: thanks and all, but geeesh, what is this, "Oprah?"

    ...."Hello Dolly" Babs:
    ....fettishes?....favorite positions?....com'on readers, details!....

    :)
     
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  36. Dedans Penthouse

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    Above posts: thanks and all, but geeesh, what is this, "Oprah?"

    ...."Hello Dolly" Babs 'meats' the Zen Master:
    ....fettishes?....favorite positions?....com'on readers, details!....

    :shock:
     
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  37. llama

    llama Rookie

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    Not well-written? The book was (and Agassi has stated it again and again, for those who are ready to jump in saying he didn't give credit to his ghost-writer) co-written by J.R. Moehinger - a Pulitzer Prize winning author. The reviews of the book, by professional critics, have been glowing in their praise of the writing. There is no "sense" of closure because the book ends in 2003when his career ended - his life continues. And he has said many times that he and his father have settled their differences and his parents are a huge part of his and his children's lives.

    And with due respect, those who keep bringing up the "meth" story, but admit that they haven't read the book, really should either read it or let it go. The "meth" story was such a small incident in the book - totally blown out of proportion by the media. He never "blamed" his trainer. (It wasn't his trainer - it was his "gofer".) And he merely says that this was the person who introduced him to the drug. There was no "blame" involved. He fully admits he made the decision to take the drug himself. If you read the book you'd also learn that when this guy and his girlfriend became parents of an ultra-preemie baby, it was Agassi that arranged for the baby to have the best of medical care and found - and paid for a home close to the hospital for them.

    And HunterST has to be the most intelligent poster on this entire board.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2010
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  38. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    Yes. He did, in fact, it does make me wonder, as one poster suggested previously, if he let key admissions go because he's thinking of politics one day.

    It did not help him for the very thoughtful readers, especially those who really followed his career, and know that he whitewashed and lied about a number of things. Even if you don't know his career, once you look past the engaging writing, you do start to see some ugly attitudes, and the hypocrisy.

    (Right Michael Chang? PRAISE JESUS! Still feels good to "kick your ass" Jeff Tarango cause you cheated when you were what....TEN? OK, Pete you beat me...but hey, you're a cheap tipper...err...I think....maybe....just needed to mention that.....Yeah...Boris Becker....you're a fake intellectual...playing the angst ridden and introspective tennis player when actually you're a farmboy....I bet you never even finished high school...oh wait....why does that sound familiar?? Jimmy Connors you're the world's biggest ahole....(well he is, but so what if he didnt' want to chitchat with Andre)...I remember when I made fun of you when I said I can't imagine playing tennis and being so old....oh wait...you were 36 when I said that....oooh....better not put that in the book.... )

    Bill Shelton? Who's that?? Nick B? Largely inconsequential, just riding off me for a bit! Lying to the press and fans? That's all I do...all the time...boy, I hate it when other people lie and are fake....I think I'll mock them....oh...whoops....

    Should have been kicked out of the USO? Um....let's not get into that. Got caught trying to find a Doctor who would lie for me to get out of an exhibition after defaulting from a Davis Cup match due to "injury"....yeah....no good way to spin that one...OUT OF THE BOOK!

    Oh and let's mention Pat Etcheberry....the "spitting Chilean"...let's mention he spits while talks...lets mention it A LOT, in fact, try to make that be the most memorable think about him...oh that and he's totally incompetent...and would have destroyed my career with injuries...and doesn't even know how to do a basic arm curl...good thing for Pat that Courier and Sampras and many others didn't figure that out! I like Gil better...never mind that at the time, I talked up Pat almost as much as I talk up Gil now....

    ETC ETC ETC.

    Still, a good read! But one that needs to be taken with an enormous amount of salt.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2010
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  39. pjonesy

    pjonesy Professional

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    You are correct. "Not particularly well written", was the wrong description. In my opinion, the STORY was not particularly well told. It was like a movie that starts off well, gives you insight into the back story, has great action and then just goes nowhere. There were parts that I liked. Agassi's pursuit of Graf, his description of the "dragon" and his recollection of the back pain that plagued him his last few years. It just did not give me any clearer picture of who Andre Agassi really is. His spotty praise for some players and his contempt for others just left me confused as to what his purpose was in specifically pointing out his contemporaries faults. It left me wondering if this guy is truly a wonderful human being, who has devoted his post tennis life to the education of less fortunate children or is he a phony, who fooled us all into believing he had a full head of hair, loved tennis and was a true fan of the Red Hot Chili Peppers (not Richard Marx). Its nothing personal on my part and maybe Agassi is all of those things. Maybe he is just complicated.
     
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  40. hfmf

    hfmf New User

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    See, I thought that the talk about him pursuing Steffi was the weakest part of the story. He can talk and talk about how things with Brooke Shields didn't go well, but everything with Steffi is a fairytale! I have a feeling that if he wrote this book after another 10 years if he divorces again, he'll trash that relationship as well.
     
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  41. llama

    llama Rookie

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    I think the catch is "truly a wonderful human being". I find that the people who were disappointed in the book are also the people who use phrases like "elder statesman of the game" and "ambassador for tennis". This is THEIR perception - not Agassi's. Like the rest of us - he is a human being and like most of us, he probably doesn't fit into one "box". The difference being - of course - no one's interested in our lives. Why can't he be the person who holds a grudge AND the person who now devotes his life to the betterment of kids? No one is a saint. No one is a devil. I was taken slightly aback at some of the incidents he cites. (Not Jeff Tarango - Jeff Tarango deserves everything he gets). I don't think it was necessary to mention the "tipping" incident - but I also see how he relates this to his early life when his family depended on the tips his father brought home. Just like all of us - he has certain triggers. This obviously was one of them. And this is an autobiography. I think I would have been disappointed if it had been the usual "what a great guy", "yeah, I sure remember that tournament" sort of a book. To me - THAT would have been phony.

    The media gave him his "persona". I think he felt that once and for all he was going to show that he wasn't that persona - he was just a person who was forced into a life he didn't want, was really scared and confused a lot of the time, made big mistakes, learned tough lessons, still has "tender" spots, but in the end comes out ok - but is still learning and growing.
     
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  42. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    Whew...the media! Is this the same Llama who said that he didnt' know ANYTHING about Sampras' charitable givings but knew that he was in NO way charitable or a philanthropist because the media would have reported it?
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=306661&page=13&highlight=llama

    But it is great that you see such a subtle nuanced picture of Andre and all others....realizing that you don't really know these people except through the media, both that created by journalists and these individuals themselves...it is good that you don't prejudge or make blanket statements. Not everyone is like that you know! Some fanboys here, go so far as to always defend their favorite player at any cost, regardless of rationality, and bash other players with various assaults on their personality. I know....terrible...what kind of an idiot would do that?? ("What I hate is the hypocrisy" = Llama)


    LLAMA QUOTES: regarding the book
    "I'll buy it. I've always admired him as a tennis player and a decent person."


    regarding Pete
    "Personally, I don't think I could ever spend an evening with a person who admits to only reading three books in his life...to me that's just sad - and frightening..."


    "If you spent the evening with Andre you know you'd be entertained, the conversation would be stimulating, you'd laugh a lot and he'd pick up the tab. An evening with Pete would be akin to watching paint dry - and you'd have to leave the tip."



    "Are all of you so one-dimensional that you don't realize Agassi is talking about Sampras as a PERSON, not a tennis player? And there is no denying that Sampras, as a PERSON is indeed one-dimensional."


    "Sampras may have beaten Agassi more, but he was SO DULL - he should have had points deducted for that alone."


    "Did Andre steal your girlfriend?

    "People might respect Sampras' tennis, but the don't love him.

    People respect Agassi's tennis and they do love him.
    "


    Regarding Agassi homophobic comment (note, there have been many more over the years than just the one being talked about), and no, we haven't ALL said bigoted things at one time or another...lol

    "I'm not saying it didn't happen. I've heard that quote many times. The point is we've ALL said bigoted things at one time or another - anyone who denies it is lying."


    Regarding an injury many people thought was faked, incidently, now that you read the book would you still say Agassi has never quite a match? Anyone who knows tennis, knows that Agassi has quit many a matches, and in fact, one of the issues,I said I wanted to see him address, pancakegate, was directly relevent

    "No, I didn't see the x-rays. But I'm not the one accusing him of faking an injury. And he didn't quit at Roland Garros last year - when even you must admit that he was in terrible pain. He said afterward that he had never quit a match and never would if he could manage to play on. As for the exhibition, he also said he and Steffi were committed and didn't want to disappoint anyone."
     
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  43. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

    Joined:
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    But your best post remains (you are the voice of impartial reason!):

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Datacipher [​IMG]
    Obviously you love Agassi, which is your right, however, if YOU'RE going to post - get your logic straight. First, Agassi had now admitted to cheating the very sport which got him all those riches. Second, I don't feel I'm in a position to judge Sampras relative contribution to society as compared to Agassi, and I'm not sure why you do either. A lot of players (sampras included, do not publicize all their philanTHROpic work). Third, even if we had the knowledge and right to judge who is more philanthropic, that in NO WAY implies that Agassi himself is not resentful of Sampras' tennis accomplishments. When he goes out of his way to publicly write about ONE incident of Sampras giving a low tip....well...it's hardly a classy move and certainly makes one question, why such a petty incident would be deemed worthy of placement in one's public biography.

    So please, try to be at least superficially objective.

    PS. Never mind. No mind in even trying. The childish mentality (Llama) that accuses others of not liking Agassi, writes posts consisting of:

    "Are all of you so one-dimensional that you don't realize Agassi is talking about Sampras as a PERSON, not a tennis player? And there is no denying that Sampras, as a PERSON is indeed one-dimensional."

    So, that speaks for itself.


    Actually, I don't "love" Agassi. And I could care less if you hate his guts. I make no apologies for being interested in complex, compelling people, other than mindless robots. Mea culpa that "one dimensional people" bore me to tears. Just a quirk of mine. And the only thing that causes me to respond to these posts is that I loathe this "holier than thou" attitude of people. They seem so positively affronted that Agassi had the NERVE to not be the person they thought he should be! And he CONFESSED it!! What kind of a person would do THAT???? He had the audacity to say he HATED tennis! Why - this wasn't the perception of him at all. How DARE he? How dare he mess up our little tennis world! So neatly stacked with everyone in their proper place.

    What I hate is the hypocrisy. How many times in your life, when your own personal world is lousy, do you meet an acquaintance who queries "How are you" - and you say "fine, just fine" when all the while you're miserable. You think you might have an STD, you're in trouble at work, your significant other might not be your significant other for long. But still you put up a facade. Just being "civilized" you tell yourself, although you'd love a shoulder to cry on. Well, Agassi was "civilized for a long time, saying the right things, smiling the right smiles, all to make tennis fans feel that all was right in their own little world, with Agassi in his proper position as "elder statesman", spending his spare time bemoaning the fact that Pete Sampras was better than he was. How DARE he have different feelings! How DARE he hate tennis for a good part of his life - and have the nerve to ADMIT it!!!! How DARE he perceive Sampras as less than the GOAT!!! And as for DRUGS!!!! Why - no one respectable EVER touches drugs! And to admit it! What kind of a person does that??? Oh, I don't know, maybe a decent person who, for no other reason than he wants to confess, does so. Depression???? Why, that's not appropriate either. In little tennis minds Agassi has it all, money, fame, Graf - how DARE he admit to depression!!

    So to make yourself feel better about this betrayal you say say - ah! but of course it's because he's so bitter, he's so filled with envy of Pete Sampras, this must be the reason. This makes you feel so much better.

    I'd venture a guess that he rarely gives Pete Sampras a second thought - but if it makes YOUR world feel better that he's reeling with jealousy - then carry on.

    After seeing the thread "Who's hotter, Shields or Graf?" I gave my head a shake and said -for God's sake WHAT are you doing hanging around this place???? I'm most defnitely not a hormone-driven adolescent....so no more posts for me. A little voice inside me just whispered "you're better than this - and I am".
     
    #43
  44. EKnee08

    EKnee08 Professional

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    Yes, a very interesting read and I am morethan halfway through but he seems to be a negative person, blames everyone else and does not take responsibility for his actions and makes excuses. The fact that he disliked other players and rivals is not something unique but he could have taken a higher road. I may have a selective memory but he is much more critical of his rivals than Johnny Mac was in his book including Lendl, who he absolutely hated when they were both on the tour, ...Connors, etc.
     
    #44
  45. EKnee08

    EKnee08 Professional

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    He spent two to three pages on that and never did he ever discuss them sleeping together. He did refer to going on "dates" and being "friends" with her. But come on, they "probably" slept together.
     
    #45
  46. EKnee08

    EKnee08 Professional

    Joined:
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    Great points!... and just because Pat E. didn't work out for Agassi as a trainer doesn't mean that he didn't know what he was doing. Why is it then that Pat Etcheberry has been the strength and conditioning coach, for, among many others, tennis players like Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, Monica Seles, Jennifer Capriati, Martina Hingis, Jelena Janković and Justine Henin and golf players like Ernie Els, David Duval and Nick Faldo.
    Justine Henin in particular gave him ample credit for bring her to the next level and helping her attain the number 1 ranking.

    Why does Agassi knock Pat? From the tone of the book, Andre was very needy and as Andre admitted Gil became his surrogate father. That does not mean that Pat didn't know what he was doing, just that Gil fit his emotional needs.
     
    #46
  47. EKnee08

    EKnee08 Professional

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    He used that "persona" to make millions and millions of dollars. For many years, he was the second highest earner of all athletes in endorsements behind MJ. He has also learned how to cultivate an image. People who know nothing of tennis, now all think that Agassi is the greatest philanthropist of all time among all celebrites. He is a great philanthropist but he wants everyone to know, eg the Longiness watch commercials, etc.
     
    #47
  48. statto

    statto Professional

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    England
    I read it this week, and he dropped in my estimation. The book wasn't very well written. I'd have liked to have heard more about his charitable foundation. He called his book open but he wasn't really open when it came to his personality.

    I didn't like that he makes a bigger deal over Sampras tipping a dollar than he did over his meth issue. I didn't like that he attributes most of his losses to his mind not being right as opposed to the good play of his opponents. I didn't like that he seems to have a chip on his shoulder about Sampras having a better H2H record against him. I'm struggling to think of a single player who he actually seemed to respect.

    I also question his hatred for tennis. None of the reasons he gave for continuing to play after leaving home hold any water. He concludes the book talking about going to hit with Steffi for fun. Doesn't sound like someone who hates tennis to me.

    He also comes across as a very selfish person when it comes to his relationships, with the exception of Wendi.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2010
    #48
  49. llama

    llama Rookie

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    Ah - and as sure as the sun sets in the West, here comes Dicpher - or something or other - with his insults and what he considers his "pithy", intelligent and cutting remarks. Do you actually believe I have enough time to read through all your silly nonsense? Does it make you feel "important"? Does it make you feel like the bully on the playground? Will all your little minions gather 'round you? Oh! What a power trip! There must be something intrinsicly wrong with a person who feels the need to blather on the way you do. Do you do it because you think it "cuts me down to "size". You're laughable. Run along sonny. Let's make a little deal - I'll certainly ignore you. Please show me the same courtesy. Just a bit of advice. DO NOT for one second believe you are some sort of "superior" to me. If I wanted to - and I don't - I could chew you up and spit you out.
     
    #49
  50. hfmf

    hfmf New User

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    To the fellow above who picked a ton of pro agassi, anti sampras quotes from another poster's previous posts? You have a LOT of time to prove your points. As for being a fan of one vs. the other, I think that that's how the tennis community wanted it to be? You like one or the other, because they're so different. Honestly, I wouldn't want to hang around with Pete Sampras. He doesn't seem very smart to me. When he got picked on for not tipping in the Haiti charity match, what did he turn to?

    Agassi: (After having a serve blasted at him on the baseline) "It's still better than being a valet driver and seeing you pull up."

    Sampras: "So I'm a bad tipper! Sorry Barack Obama."

    You tell me who is the person with the quick wit? Sorry Barack Obama? What does that even MEAN? That whole match was filled with Agassi's running commentary, since he recognized the match was for fun and giggles. It was totally Sampras who turned that match ugly.
     
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