Alpha Revo 4000 and Wise tension head-- My reveiw

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Power Game, Jul 3, 2004.

  1. Power Game

    Power Game Professional

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    I got the Revo over the Axis pro to save money and I really like it. The 6 pt mounting is great and the machine is very solid and heavy. The wise head is a bit noisy but saves time and works great. I would like to see it hold the string longer when it prestretches though.
    I'll be happy to answer any questions.
     
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  2. thebeast

    thebeast Rookie

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    What, if any, downsides are there to the wise tensioner.

    Also, do you happen to know how durable a product this is. Is there a warranty?
     
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  3. Power Game

    Power Game Professional

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    It has a two year warranty. I can't say how durable it is. I know there are a couple of guys here with wise heads who have strung hundreds of racquets with no problems.


    Downsides:
    1. It isn't that noisy as the gripper pulls but as it adjusts the tension to get it to what you set it at it makes this clicking noise.
    2. The price, it is $500, but when you compare them to other electrics it is cheap
    3. I would have liked to have a larger control pad, so one button only does one thing rather than hold 2 buttons to change something.
    4. You lose 360 degree rotation, so you do one string then you swing it around the long way, so that is something that might take getting used to
     
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  4. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    I've had the Wise unit on my Alpha Apex for about 1 1/2 years. So far, no significant problems. I've strung on a Bab Sensor and I think the Wise is easier to string on.
     
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  5. thebeast

    thebeast Rookie

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    that's saying a lot, i don't string a lot. but i have seen the sensor, and it is one sweet looking machine. You have strung 1.5 years on it . . . and from others posts of yours i've read, i'd take it that's quite a few racquets.
     
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  6. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    The Sensor is a sweet looking machine, but there were some things I didn't like about the one I strung on. One is the tension head activation "button." It is extremely sensitive. It can be activated without even touching it and there is no foot pedal option for the Sensor. Unless the clamp bases and tracks are cleaned religiously, they start to stick. Also, the clamp releases on the machine I used acted differently on one clamp than the other. It took more force to release one of them.
     
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  7. RacquetDoctor

    RacquetDoctor Rookie

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    I respectfully disagree. Based on your description of the machine, the machine you did your test on had not been maintained or maybe had never been properly set up. My clamp bases slide like they are on ice. If the bases are properly set up, when you release a clamp, they fall and release the base lock. When the machine is delivered, their are a few things that need to be done to the machine prior to stringing. Sounds like the machine you used never was properly taken out of shipping mode(the bases are set extremely tight and must be adjusted prior to using). As far as the tracks being cleaned religously, well, hardly. Wipe the table down with alcohol after 30 or so racquets...This is no more than any other machine.
    The tension activation button is sensitive by design. With a little practice, the motion of inserting the string and tensioning it is fluid...faster than using a foot pedal, clearly faster than any other machine that I have used. Stringing one racquet on a machine can hardly give you an informed opinion of the Sensor, more so if it has not been maintained.
    I have also used a wise tension head(more than once) and find that the Sensor tension head is easier...
    I think that if you asked around to a number of stringers that are familiar with both, you'd find your opinion in the minority...
     
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  8. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    The Sensor I strung on was in the store front hdq of a pro tour stringing team. They had 3 of them plus 3 Star III's. It was not a new machine. One clamp released both the head and base quite easily. The other one was sticky. I am not the only one who has complained about the Sensor clamp tracks. A very well known and respected Wimbeldon stringer has complained on the GGS board about the clamp bases and tracks getting sticky and the cleaning procedure he uses including gun powder solvent and alcohol to get them clean. I have also heard others complain about the activation button on the Sensor, some of who were experienced users of Bab machines wishing they would bring back the Star III machines.
     
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  9. RacquetDoctor

    RacquetDoctor Rookie

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    I'm not saying that people haven't had complaints. But what I am saying is, is that it is far superior to other machines. I have adjusted many machines that are in shops here in Atl, that have NEVER been properly adjusted. Believe me, it makes a world of difference. I have also experience first hand the dieing board on multiple wise heads...something that has been corrected(I hear). I have seen alpha clamp bases fail, and even saw a post let go on a Blu DC machine...If you want horror stories, I got 'em, just ask. I know the guy you speak of...he has earned the right, but he has complaints about all machines, and If it's the guy I thinking about, the sensor is still his machine....Babolat is the standard by which all else are measured. I happen to fall in the 'experienced' category, and the Star III is probably the best for a Tourney, not because it performs better, it is because it's lighter and travels better. People will continue to have preferences for one reason or another. I still stick by the fact that the one you strung on was not maintained properly. Pro stringing team or not, they may not know how to properly tune it. It kinda comes down to this: You may know how to play the piano, but you probably don't know how to tune it perfectly.
     
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