Andres racket?

Discussion in 'Pros' Racquets and Gear' started by jeffatl, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. jeffatl

    jeffatl New User

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    Anyone know what size Andre Agassi's racket head is?
     
    #1
  2. dAgEnIuS

    dAgEnIuS Rookie

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    107 sq in.

    i think,,
    that was his his LM radical's size,
    but not sure if the FP radical is same or not...
     
    #2
  3. tommytom11

    tommytom11 Rookie

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    thats right, 107.
     
    #3
  4. jeffatl

    jeffatl New User

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    Cool, what are the pros/cons of a larger/ smaller head size?
     
    #4
  5. alan-n

    alan-n Professional

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    Pros:
    Larger sweet spot, potential for more power vs identical racquet construction and string pattern in smaller size. Prefered by baseline bashers and pushers. Good for blocking shots.

    Cons:
    Potentially less control. Offcenter hits = more racquet twist due to wider string bed = not for one handed backhands.
     
    #5
  6. Ash Doyle

    Ash Doyle Professional

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    I thought it had been said that when Andre switched to the liquid metal PJ, he really did switch racquets (although not to the real liquid metal), and these new racquets had a head size of 104".

    Alan-n, don't tell little Ollie Rochus an oversize doesn't work with a one-handed backhand. :)
     
    #6
  7. zorg

    zorg Professional

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    A question on Andre's frame. If he is using the same racket for about 10 years, wouldn't it be bad? There is better technology now, so why would he. This is just what I think, because many ppl say that he is using the same racket for basiclly 10 years now.
     
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  8. chad shaver

    chad shaver Semi-Pro

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    It's the archer, not the arrow....
     
    #8
  9. MChong

    MChong Semi-Pro

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    Actually, I think a more correct metaphor would be It's the archer, not the bow. ;)
     
    #9
  10. alan-n

    alan-n Professional

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    Rochus strings his racket at rediculous low tensions... That certainly helps.
     
    #10
  11. kv581

    kv581 Semi-Pro

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    How does having low string tensions (ie. high power) help against OS racquets potentially having less control and more torsion?

    Also, I am not entirely convinced that OS racquets twist more than mid sized racquets if the ball is struck at spots on the respective string beds that are equally far from the sweetspot. And while it is true that balls struck at the edge of OS frames result in extreme torsion and instability as you mentioned due to their wider string beds, at least you still got to the ball! Under the same situation, if the racquet had been mid-sized the player may have missed the ball completely. Thus, I don't think OS racquets having wider stringbeds should be viewed as a cause for instability.

    OS do have other cons, though. I've noticed that, possibly due to their more dispersed distribution of weight in the hoop compared to smaller headed racquets (given the same static weight and balance), OS racquets can be a bit unwieldy particularly during the wrist-snap motion when serving. On the other hand, this seems to make groundies solid since it keeps your wrists firmer.
     
    #11

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