any advice form older players and injuries

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by hoppy123, Jul 20, 2013.

  1. hoppy123

    hoppy123 New User

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    I am 50 and have been out of shape since 30 . I started playing again for the last 18 months and got to about a 3.5 -4 due to lessons from a awesome coach . Any way the last say 4 month been playing in a league with younger people and have been playing really aggressive all out for about 90 mins. I had a leg/muscle injury a few weeks a ago got over that now i got Plantar Fasciitis . Its awesome excercise and love it but hate the injuries . Any suggestion maybe better conditioning or try to lose more weight first ? Or do i have to play double with the seniors LOL !
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    50 is still young enough for singles if you work you way up to it, taking small steps to allow your body to adjust to the recovery needed, usually a full day of non strenous activity after a tennis day.
    I know a few 70 year olds who play top of the heap 4.0 level singles, enough to bother most 4.5's. Of course, they didn't wear out their bodies in their youth, have no significant injuries, and know to rest and recover after hard days on the courts.
    They also know when to let a ball go, that they would get to, but not do anything with, so they save their bodies.
    You mind allows you to play singles forever, but your body limits your levels.
     
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  3. chatt_town

    chatt_town Hall of Fame

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    That is great advice man. I'm learning a lot of what you are saying at 44. I would play some times 2 singles matches and 3 doubles matches in a day at 36 or 37.lol I play maybe once or twice a week of singles now...the rest if any is doubles.lol I also drink nothing but water during the summer months especially when I know I'm going to playing singles like tomorrow. Well I'll have some juice here or there but I'm putting away enough water for 2 or 3 guys a day now.lol

     
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  4. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Plantar fasciitis is often associated with the calf muscle being tight and short. This condition stresses the calves, achilles, and plantar fascia/tissues. Tight calves are often a life-style issue - many hours of the week with the calves held in a shortened position and then playing tennis for a few hours where the calves, achilles, and plantar fascia(tissues) are stretched and stressed.

    In my case, the PF got worse over a year as I played tennis. I took off 3 months from tennis to get rid of it.

    Injury issues have an aging factor and a conditioning factor. You can learn about the conditioning factors and change them.

    Learn the common tennis injuries and associated conditioning for injury prevention. Research any of these injury issues elsewhere in detail and double check corrective conditioning for prevention from other sources. For injuries and treatment, see a Dr.

    http://www.med.nyu.edu/pmr/residenc...clinics NA_sports med/MSK injuries tennis.pdf

    http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Game/Sport-Science/339840_Injuries_and_Tennis_Technique/

    http://cstl-hhs.semo.edu/pujol/hl34...ries_in_Tennis_Players__Exercises_to.6[1].pdf

    Shoulder
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2577490/
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2013
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  5. tmc5005

    tmc5005 Rookie

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    Not sure how much PF is an age issue I used to have it when I was on my high school tennis player playing on hard courts 5 or 6 days a week Now in my 50's I do not have it and have not had it since. If I starting playing every day on hard courts it most likely would come back
     
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  6. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    I find weight to be the biggest issue with PF. Not even fat - just plain weight. After getting under 200lbs my PF is just fading away.

    Also..

    #1. Don't play on consecutive days.
    #2. Get yourself somewhat fit off-court.
    #3. Gradually increase your play time..

    Lots of people think playing tennis will get them fit. I think get yourself fit to play tennis. I suppose the second option is less fun. But that's how life is. Tennis is an impact sport..
     
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  7. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I got PF the first time when I was over 200 pounds about 15 years ago. I was also using worn shoes and I think that contributed to the problem.

    I got rid of the problem with night splints, stretching, aftermarket insoles and losing a lot of weight. I may get a twinge once every two years or so but I can just amp up my stretching to get rid of it.
     
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  8. hoppy123

    hoppy123 New User

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    I think this is true . When you get to 3.5 and start to play more aggressive if your not at a healthy weight or not in really good shape you will get injuries . I am overweight and only 60% fit and only doing tennis . i have taken a month off of tennis and using this time to do some cycling and weight lifting . I need to get fit if i want to play tennis without injuries
     
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  9. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    Getting to a healthy weight is more about nutrition than exercise. Tennis is a good sport to burn calories, probably better than running; but you do risk injuries with the extra weight. This is true with running too - but you also risk overuse injuries with running, even if you aren't overweight.
     
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  10. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Agree. But most people getting healthy work on their diet even if its by luck. For example if you just hit the gym you sorta don't even want to eat a twinkie because you fear all you work will be undone. (And you would be right haha).
     
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  11. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I know lots of people that have been trying to lose weight for years - they show up at the gym everyday to do low-intensity cardio and they never lose any weight. It's generally because of what they're doing on the nutrition side.

    If additional weight contributes to injury, then it is easier to put more effort into nutrition to get the weight down before working on the exercise front to decrease injury potential. Then you can get the two working in parallel.
     
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  12. adventure

    adventure Banned

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    You don't mention your height and weight.

    However, cycling, swimming and walking are excellent means of losing weight. You also have to eat right, which can take a lot of discipline given the temptations around us.

    All of the exercises I mentioned place less stress on your joints.

     
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  13. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    Losing weight doesn't preclude doing workouts to prevent injury.

    I'm a big believer in weight lifting for the older player to prevent injuries. Over all strengthening will allow you to play harder with less chance of stress and strain. Do basic compound exercises to start out.
     
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  14. Raul_SJ

    Raul_SJ Professional

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    Running is much better than tennis for burning calories.

    My experience is that a typical rec player would have to play at least an hour of singles (usually more) to equal the calorie burn of a 30 minute 5K run
     
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  15. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    > My experience is that a typical rec player would
    > have to play at least an hour of singles (usually
    > more) to equal the calorie burn of a 30 minute 5K run

    Tennis is more of an interval sport and I think that the science is with me in that interval workouts burn more calories than aerobic activities. Part of that is elevated metabolism well after the actual activity.

    http://www.t-nation.com/free_online...raining_performance/the_hierarchy_of_fat_loss
     
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  16. DirtBaller4

    DirtBaller4 Rookie

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    It's all about balancing your nutrition input Vs. burn rate of said nutrition. The guys I know that have had the most amazing bodies all have very strict diets.

    Try eating smaller portions 5 times a day and makes sure it's low fat, high protein and some fiber. This keeps your engine running all day slowly feeding your recycling center makes it run smoother than just throwing down two huge meals a day like most people.

    Next you have to hydrate properly with either straight water of a good sugar free electrolyte mix. I try to drink 3 liters a day, 4 if I am playing singles in the heat.

    A brisk 15-20 minute workout every day on top of tennis 3 times a week should be sufficient to lose weight as long as you are serious about what you eat.

    I like to use my hydraulic stepper in the morning for 5 or 10 minutes to warm up. This keeps the burn going in my legs all day long!

    This is the one I have, and it blows your legs up! If you can do this bad boy for 10 minutes a day and throw in 5 minutes of push ups, you will see and feel a difference in your fitness level very soon.

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. superdave3

    superdave3 Rookie

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    The PF you are suffering may be the result of a common affliction of us over 50 folks, which is fallen arches in your feet. I know this happened to me and a couple other over 50 players I know. While there are some exercises and stretches that will help, you might want to have a podiatrist check you out. The solution for me and the others I talked about were custom made orthodics, which solved it in a few weeks. As your feet flatten it causes the tendons and ligaments to stretch more and that can lead to PF.
     
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