Any advice is appreciated.

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by tennis5, Apr 16, 2012.

  1. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Not sure where to post this? It is a junior question, but a technical tennis one.

    My son, 15, works with two different coaches this year.
    ( Coach he started with moved...).
    Long story with court and coach availability,
    but basically he gets a lesson with the older coach one week ( age 45) and the younger coach ( age 30) the following week,
    so they alternate every other week.

    Thought it would be ok, but the problem is...
    The older coach teaches a stand on the baseline and take the ball early and is teaching a closed forehand stance.
    The younger coach is saying the game has changed and is much faster,
    and you have to step back behind the baseline, and is also teaching more of an open forehand stance.
    As my son started late, he is still getting some of the technical aspects down.
    And now, of course, my son is confused.

    I guess my question is who is right for junior tennis?
    Or are they both right, and it is a combination?
    I have watched the 16's and 18's boy's junior matches, and the game is fast.....
     
    #1
  2. Freak4tennis

    Freak4tennis Guest

    They are both right. It depends on the shot presented. If your son has an opportunity to take the ball inside the court and still hit it from a comfortable strike zone then he should close off and hit a bit early. However, if he is either on the run, or pressed with heavy balls inside the baseline then he's got to go back, hit with an open stance then move in again.
     
    #2
  3. tennisconsultcom

    tennisconsultcom Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2012
    Messages:
    102
    A player needs to listen to only one coach. If he is trained by several coaches he is not going to know which one to believe. Just choose one coach.
     
    #3
  4. marco forehand

    marco forehand Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2004
    Messages:
    203
    That is good advice. Now how do you choose between the two ? Do you understand your son's potential strengths and weaknesses ? Will he be able to run all day and cover the court ? Are his hands his strength ? His competitive spirit ?
    If these are the two choices in your area, match him up with the coach that best suits his tool set.
     
    #4
  5. Korso

    Korso Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Messages:
    636
    Location:
    Virginia
    Multiple coaches can be confusing for the learning tennis player.
    A player that can play on the baseline and hit the ball on the rise will be more of an attacking player (Andre Aggasi). If your son has this special ability to see the ball incredibly early I would stick with the coach teaching this.
    There are a lot of great players that play behind the baseline too.
    It really comes down to your child's physical abilities to play comfortably at the highest level that he can achieve.
     
    #5
  6. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Sorry, double post.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2012
    #6
  7. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Thanks everyone. Lots of good advice.

    Yes, now in retrospect, I didn't anticipate the coaches would have such a different teaching style. Live and learn......

    My son's best aspect is his return of serve. I asked the younger coach if that would translate into him taking the ball early ( like the older coach wants), and he said the game has changed too much.
     
    #7
  8. nn

    nn Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    1,952
    Location:
    Tennis World
    If you look at the Novak game against Nadal. He hits the ball early to nullify Nadal's spin shots. We all know that Novak is one of a kind who can beat best of best seven times in a row.
     
    #8
  9. jigglypuff

    jigglypuff Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2010
    Messages:
    317
    A good coach and student of the modern/evolving game would go something like this...

    Semi-open most of the time.
    Closed to drive the short balls.
    Open for deep/heavy balls.
    Always take the ball early if you can.

    At 15, two coaches are fine. You, as the third coach, is key. Your job is to put everything together to maximize your son's success. Just like what you're doing now. :)
     
    #9

Share This Page