Anyone else think the forehand is the hardest shot to master?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Jaewonnie, Aug 13, 2010.

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Forehand feels like the hardest shot to master

  1. Yes

    19 vote(s)
    28.8%
  2. No

    47 vote(s)
    71.2%
  1. Jaewonnie

    Jaewonnie Professional

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    As said in title.
     
    #1
  2. xFullCourtTenniSx

    xFullCourtTenniSx Hall of Fame

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    I think most feel that it's the EASIEST to master... o.o
     
    #2
  3. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    As for the fundamental strokes in tennis goes, I believe that distinction goes to the serve. I've seen plenty of players that posses awesome groundstrokes but have goofy or 2nd-rate serves. However, I've taught tennis to a number of accomplished badminton players (strong intermediate or better) and they often master the serve and overhead smash before developing decent groundstrokes.

    Many novices & low intermediate players tend to master the forehand before developing a decent backhand stroke. Some people that learn the 2-handed BH might master this before the FH. I would say that you are probably in the minority. What is is about your FH that seems to be problematic?
     
    #3
  4. Jaewonnie

    Jaewonnie Professional

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    hitting a consistent looking forehand. Same depth, same spin, same pace etc.

    when it comes to depth my forehand ranges from service line to middle of back fence :p My backhand (2h) does not have the same problem. Even when well struck (as in the stringbed makes a very loud crack sound), my backhand shot looks (visually) the same as any other of my backhands.

    My forehand can go all over the place. I can place it (in terms of direciton) pretty well but depth/height/spin is pretty much a gamble.
    _____________________________________________________________

    I guess in such a situation, a vid would be most helpful
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2010
    #4
  5. Ajtat411

    Ajtat411 Semi-Pro

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    I have the same issue with my forehand. I'm pretty proficient on my backhand side.

    My backhand is simple and a straight take back, my forehand on the other hand is a looped forehand and I tend to bring my racket back too far and it can cause issues with my timing sometimes.
     
    #5
  6. darthpwner

    darthpwner Banned

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    I think the serve is hardest to master
     
    #6
  7. Buffster

    Buffster Rookie

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    For me the serve is by far the hardest. I do think the forehand is a tougher shot than the backhand though.
     
    #7
  8. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    If I ever master a stroke I'll let you know.
     
    #8
  9. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Serve is the hardest, followed by volley due to its many variation. I think even pros have a lower percentage with volley than with serve. FH is, well, the easiest since it's the bread and butter of tennis. If you can't hit a FH then what do you do?
     
    #9
  10. Jaewonnie

    Jaewonnie Professional

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    run around 2h backhand :twisted:

    lol jk...thats stupid. Umm...if theres an open court, continental grip push forehand :p otherwise I take the (high) chance of hitting out.
     
    #10
  11. soyizgood

    soyizgood G.O.A.T.

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    For me, the serve is the hardest stroke. Followed by the volleys (so hit-or-miss). Forehand has always been awkward for me (stances, grips, contact point, shot depth, double bend or straight arm, takeback, etc.) while my 2hbh is much more stable.
     
    #11
  12. soyizgood

    soyizgood G.O.A.T.

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    I actually do that quite a bit. LOL
     
    #12
  13. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter Legend

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    Check out the forehand lessons, especially the "windshield wiper" forehand, at www.fuzzyyellowballs.com. That'll fix yer forehand right up, guaranteed.
     
    #13
  14. Jaewonnie

    Jaewonnie Professional

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    lol saw those 2 years ago...I'm just having trouble perfecting the forehand.
     
    #14
  15. kiteboard

    kiteboard Hall of Fame

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    Unit turn first. Point to the side fence after you let the stick go back. Fast water fluid, off good wt. trans. Feel the net.
     
    #15
  16. prattle128

    prattle128 Semi-Pro

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    serve wins for me
     
    #16
  17. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter Legend

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    Obviously, you're not executing the technique properly. But, since I haven't seen you hit, I can't give you any input. Why not just hire a qualified coach to teach you how to properly execute the WW forehand?
     
    #17
  18. Chanto

    Chanto Rookie

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    I don't see how someone can master a shot. There's always room for improvement.

    That being said, I'm going to interpret this as "Which do I have more trouble with," since this forum is mostly around 3.5's.

    I rather see forehand as a difficult shot, mainly because of 1 handed dominance.

    I just realized today that every 2 handed forehand that I've ever seen has belonged to a 4.5+, I saw 2 5.5 2 handed forehand players playing today.

    My backhand, on the other hand, can give me rather sharp angles, and I can hit it flat with decent consistency. I guess it's because I'm lanky is all, maybe I'll try a 2 handed forehand :D
     
    #18
  19. Blake0

    Blake0 Hall of Fame

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    I voted no, but I see what you mean.

    There's so many things you can do with your forehand which makes it easier to break down. You can hit with different stances, techniques (reverse,over shoulder, WW), lots of body parts in motion (second most right under serve i think), different backswings, ways to hit (push/pull), etc.

    Basically, there are so many ways you can improve your forehand that you can just tweak it for years. Although the same goes for serves.
     
    #19
  20. darthpwner

    darthpwner Banned

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    Serve is the hardest, then overhead, then volleys, then return, then backhand, then forehand. At least for me.
     
    #20
  21. masterxfob

    masterxfob Semi-Pro

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    this

    10 char
     
    #21
  22. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    serve and then the backhand overhead.
     
    #22
  23. Radicalized

    Radicalized Semi-Pro

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    Not the hardest to master or let's say be "extremely proficient." I say the serve, for first and second, with the oppotunity in your hand to win easy points. Depends on the level you are capable of reaching. Might be hardest to go from adequate to "bang-zoom-:shock:" with. Many of the others don't get the same type of attribution as a weapon or get the consistent use, depending on one's game. Many player's don't fully understand how to utilize the serve for what it can be, including myself, as I'm working on that, for a number of reasons. The forehand--now that is often front and center in one's mind.
     
    #23
  24. Radicalized

    Radicalized Semi-Pro

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    Typo: Many "players" don't, not "player's"
     
    #24
  25. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    I am frustrated by my forehand - while I can of course hit them its not nearly up to the level of my serve.. So this can vary from person to person.
     
    #25
  26. lonux

    lonux Hall of Fame

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    Serve
    Overhead
    Volley
    Forehand
    Backhand
     
    #26
  27. xFullCourtTenniSx

    xFullCourtTenniSx Hall of Fame

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    That's a problem FOR YOU. If you looked at other players, few share the same problem. If anything, once you improve to the point that you have a solid forehand, you'll be a dangerous player simply because people won't expect your backhand to be better, and will naturally hit to it and get burned. It happened to me. I just assumed the backhand was weaker, and a lot more of my game than I thought was built around attacking that backhand. So when I kept hitting to it and trying to attack it, I just kept getting burned. When I hit to it on defense to try and get to neutral, I got burned. Next time I played him, I reworked my strategy to purely attack his forehand, and it worked. Serves there all day long, followed by my heavy topspin forehand.
     
    #27
  28. MarrratSafin

    MarrratSafin Hall of Fame

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    For me, yes forehand is the hardest. Luckily, I've finally got it after nearly a year of work and experimenting.:twisted: First serve and backhand are the easiest IMHO. Kinda like the opposite with most guys!:grin:
     
    #28
  29. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    The thing about the serve that makes it easier is that you are ALWAYS in perfect position to hit it. Thus if movement is your weak spot - then the serve is probably going to be your best shot. So I actually think your perfectly normal.
     
    #29
  30. Jaewonnie

    Jaewonnie Professional

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    ya I agree here. The forehand has much more of a variety of positions to hit from so I guess that might be whats throwing me off.
     
    #30
  31. zacinnc78

    zacinnc78 Professional

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    for me ,the overhead is the shot i have the most problem with(and i have a great serve IMO,not to say i couldnt improve it)
    next is volleys followed closely by backhand slice (i can do backhand smashes better than a regular set-up overhead
     
    #31
  32. Sandwichman

    Sandwichman Rookie

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    My biggest problem on my forehand is my shoulder turn. i always pop open my shoulder too early, causing my shots to go wide a lot.
     
    #32
  33. 1stVolley

    1stVolley Rookie

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    I think the serve and half volley are the hardest shots to master, closely followed by the backhand overhead
     
    #33
  34. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    How is your gaze control on your FH shots? Are you keeping your head very still on your forward swing (like Roger or Rafa)? You may be sabotaging your swing (path) by moving your head prematurely.

    How about your elbow position? It is not easy to control the FH swing using a (nearly) straight arm like Federer does. You may be better off with a double bend instead. On low to medium height shots, the elbow should not stray too far from the body until some time after contact. If you have a wandering elbow on shots at waist level (or lower), this may cause your inconsistencies.

    Also, is your grip (position) consistent?
     
    #34
  35. Jaewonnie

    Jaewonnie Professional

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    umm I havent thought much of my gazing much but I don't think that's the cause.

    My elbow position is straight. I'm trying to emulated Federer and the stroke is coming along. :lol: The reason I prefer the straight arm is because its much easier to hit a variety of depth and angle. For some reason, I don't find the straight arm to supply more power than the double bend as said by others. I actually find the opposite. Probably cuz I find it harder to swing faster with a straight arm. Trying to match pace with the double bend and overswinging might be the cause of fencing some of my forehand :p
    On low-medium height shots to my forehand, I can't do too much errors on those except for netting them. I'm fine with those shots.

    And my grip is always eastern. Never changes for different situations.

    I think I'm hitting tomorrow so I'll try getting a vid. Thx
     
    #35
  36. supineAnimation

    supineAnimation Professional

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    In my experience this is generally not the case. Most of the players I've coached develop the forehand more naturally and it remains their best ground shot throughout their development. Personally, my forehand has always been the most natural shot for me, and while I'm not clear about what "master" would mean in this context, the forehand, for most, is most akin to throwing the ball from their palm as they would without the racquet and so it is more natural and easier to develop into a consistently good shot than the backhand. I think the serve is the most difficult, generally speaking.
     
    #36
  37. adlis

    adlis Professional

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    look at my shot video . A 6.0 can effortlessly execute the forehand
     
    #37
  38. jigar

    jigar Professional

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    I with you on this issue for the problems I am facing right now.
     
    #38
  39. Vermillion

    Vermillion Banned

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    Based on my experience teaching my friends, they seem to have a lot of problem with what to do with the off-hand. I must admit, it feels quite awkward when I try to play lefty. I'm not sure how long it took me to get used to the motion when I first started.
     
    #39
  40. Donny0627

    Donny0627 Professional

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    it is not for me personally, but i can understand why others may find the forehand the hardest shot to master...
     
    #40
  41. Frank Silbermann

    Frank Silbermann Professional

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    Forehand is harder to master than the backhand only if you have higher expectations for it. In the 1970s, someone explaining the importance of being able to hit a strong forehand down-the-line opined that that a forehand that can be hit hard only cross-court is a weak forehand. On another occasion someone else mentioned that often a strong backhand is often only strong cross-court.

    So, what was strong for a backhand was considered weak for a forehand. No wonder people said the backhand was "easier to master." The standards were lower.
     
    #41
  42. pwyman

    pwyman New User

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    Have you considered that you're using one of the least forgiving racquets made? Not to mention you have it strung incredibly tight, which makes it even less forgiving and more up to you. Have you tried other racquets? I also use the mid size YT Prestige but didn't really like the racquet as much as the older versions (I used the Austrian made i.Prestige until my last ones broke) until I added some weight in a polarized fashion, which is weight at 12 and counterweight in the handle. I think equipment is generally one of the least important aspects of the game, however when you use a mid sized, completely unforgiving racquet, and string it at a high tension, your game needs to be up to the challenge. It sounds as if your forehand isn't reliable enough to be played with that racquet.

    I also hit primarily a modern eastern forehand as you mentioned you do as well. For a shot that requires more depth and spin I drop my racquet under the height of the ball more than I would on a shorter, flatter shot, trying to swing slightly more up on the ball and still keeping my horizontal follow-through. I think if you concentrate on how you're striking the ball and your preparation you'll develop some more consistency with the shot. Also, as is the nature of that stroke, even if you coil and pummel the shot, it still lands about halfway between the service and baseline. That racquet/swing combination is absolutely devastating provided you're generating enough racquet head speed through the ball. In summation:

    1. Deeper ball/more spin needed drop the racquet a bit more before meeting the ball.
    2. Make sure to prepare enough to have a full, fluid swing through the ball.
    3. Concentrate on acceleration through contact and more wrist pronation to generate more spin.
     
    #42

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