Anyone lose interest...?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by jlee0408, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. jlee0408

    jlee0408 New User

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    I have always enjoyed tennis so much that I never considered that it would be anything but fun. Lately though, I feel as though I'm losing interest. Should I keep playing: taking lessons, drills, doubles etc and perhaps I will feel differently (maybe this is just a short lived slump or mental issue)? Or should I stop playing and maybe that will make me miss tennis and I will have more desire for it?

    Any suggestions or experience that you may have had with this would be helpful.
     
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  2. Alchemy-Z

    Alchemy-Z Hall of Fame

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    I sometimes take a breaks from Lessons/Clinics because ultimately I play for fun..and while I enjoy improving if i start to sacrifice fun for improvement then i burn out quick.

    I will just play recreational tennis with friends and when the desire to improve strikes again I head back to the lessons clinic.
     
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  3. DavaiMarat

    DavaiMarat Professional

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    Joseph,
    There's a burn out syndrome that happens to everyone in tennis. It's not only physical but there's a large emotional and mental component to it as well. It's especially hard when you feel your not progressing or even worse, regressing.

    The key is to find what brought you to tennis in the 1st place and rekindle that. What happens to most people when they play, as they get better they start putting unreasonable expectations on themselves. It's propagated by their peers and watching Professional Tennis. There's pressure to win, pressure to look good and pressure to improve constantly.

    In short, tennis gets in their head and the very reason the played tennis to begin with (to have fun and play the game) gets buried in a quagmire of useless confidence issues and expectations.

    In reality the only person who really cares about how you perform is you. No one thinks twice about how Joe Lee did at the match at Div C at Thorncliff Intercounty (except perhaps your wife). And you know what? That's a good thing.

    Play without the pressure of expectations, view things from an objective mindset. You'll be surprised how far you can take you and your game.

    Good luck.
     
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  4. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Many years ago I had lost interest for a few years.

    I had a conversation with myself-

    'If we let tennis go it is not going to be good for us (exercise, friends, find replacement activity...).
    'Agreed.'
    'Let's pretend that we still like it.' ....and I did....

    2 or 3 years later I liked it more than ever.

    If your game is improving or going down - even by a little - it has a big effect on your positive interest.
     
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  5. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    Some people burn out because they've been working their butts off for years and they us get sick of the grind. Some people burn out because they hit a wall in their development and no matter what they try to do they aren't getting any better. Some people burn out because their priorities change e.g. a new wife/job/baby. When tennis just isn't that important to you anymore and it seems more like a chore, maybe you should take some time off.

    The way I look at it, it's more fun to stay fit by playing tennis than by doing something repetitive like running, and a bad day on the tennis court is still better than a good day at the office.
     
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  6. mbm0912

    mbm0912 Professional

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    very well put
     
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  7. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    no need to feel guilty. take the time off. it might even be good for your tennis.
     
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  8. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I've been playing tennis now since 1988. I've always had a love for it, but sometimes you just have to take a break from it. I always come back to it, though. I think the love of the game never goes away, even if you need to cool down for a bit.
     
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  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I took my first break 9 months after starting out. For about 3 months.
    Then a 10 year break after 1978.
    I still don't play during the summer months, as windsurfing and biking takes care of all my spare time.
    So it's fall/winter only, and about twice a week if weather allows.
     
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  10. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Totally agree with the part in red above. I played from about ages 14-19 and then a few times per year in my mid 20s and did not get back into it full time again until I was 30 for fitness. Don't get me wrong, I love the competition and trying to win matches but when I'm not playing well I just remind myself that I'd rather lose a tennis match then run on a treadmill.
     
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  11. jlee0408

    jlee0408 New User

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    Thank you for your input. Also, I recently changed instructors. I had the same coach for two and a half years and in the last month decided to try someone new. I kind of have a crush on him, somewhat distracting really. I know, I know, the lady and the tennis instructor, so cliche.
     
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  12. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    If you're both single, all/s fair in love and war. Good luck to you.
    If not, it's more likely. I taught a bit at GoldenGatePark back in the mid '70's, and it was a major problem. I was single, but none of the women who took lessons were. I was warned that by the head instructor.
    More lately, I HAD been playing a bit of mixed, and the problems resurfaced. I have a g/f, and it's hard but necessary to resist temptation.
     
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  13. Mongolmike

    Mongolmike Professional

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    I agree with taking a break... tho for some people all they do for exercise is tennis... so its difficult to find a sport/activity to replace the exercise from tennis for the short term.

    For me, playing year round I would lose the spark. When I cut back, or step away for a month or two in the off season, then come spring time I get excited to finally play again.

    The important thing for me is having multiple sport/activity options I can do in the meanwhile... walleyball, ultimate frisbee, golf, jogging, basketball... so doing something else is not an issue for me. Others are perfectly fine focusing year round on their game.

    So for you, sounds like you would be served best to step away for a few weeks or a month or two. Your game won't really suffer, and if you ARE worried about that, after you decide to come back, schedule a tune-up lesson ASAP to help you groove the good habits into your re-start. You'll be excited to play again, feeling fresh and healed up, and getting some good instruction to get you back on track.
     
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  14. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    True! mikeler!

    One year my wife went away for a year to finish her MBA. I ended up playing tennis almost 6-7 days a week. After a few months I just burned out from playing so much.

    I took about a month off and cut back to playing 2-3 times a week and found that I enjoyed tennis again.

    Wish I could have that 2-3 times a week schedule back. I'm cut back to once a week since we have new born twins.
     
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  15. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    This was important info you left out! So if you like the guy what is the problem with motivation?
     
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  16. jlee0408

    jlee0408 New User

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    Mr Mikeler:
    I think that it is possible to be attracted to my instructor and at the same time lose interest in playing tennis. I don't think that one thing excludes the other.
     
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  17. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Actually, if can work in your favor.
    If you're taking lessons and dating him, a conflict of interest arises, and you won't know if it's you or your money he's after.
    OTOH, can you stand him teaching all those other women while you're the g/f? The one who quit tennis for him?
    Either way, an adventure begins anew.
     
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  18. LanEvo

    LanEvo Hall of Fame

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    I am on break right now, I have not lose interested, but I am burned out, such that my game is really messing up, inconsistent, my mental game isnt working, etc.

    I will return when the new yr. starts.
     
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  19. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Thank you for referring to me as Mr. ;)
     
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  20. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    :)
    Mister in that she consider's you too old, basically a SENIOR, and well beyond her dating age...:confused:
     
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  21. jlee0408

    jlee0408 New User

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    Sir:
    I'm not talking about quitting tennis for him or forever, there are a lot of teaching professionals out there...
     
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  22. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Matter's little.
    HIS view is you like him, but don't take lessons from him.
     
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