anyone skied corbets couloir?

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by pushing_wins, Feb 16, 2014.

  1. pushing_wins

    pushing_wins Hall of Fame

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    any good skiers here? how difficult is it compared to tennis?
     
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  2. Hitman99

    Hitman99 Rookie

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    Very few people die or get crippled for life playing tennis.
     
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  3. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    Same with Corbet's.

    In my opinion, the snow conditions are usually so bad, it's not worth wasting the lift ride to ski it.
    Normal conditions = 5.5+ to actually "ski" it....powder/spring conditions = 4.5.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2014
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  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Dat the one up in Canada? The 100' wide entry into a freefall around 100'?
    I've never skied out of California.
    Biggest drop would be from top of Chute75 at Squaw on skis.
    On snowboard, the rock drop at DonnerSkiRanch, directly below what was then called Chair 3, that goes from the lodge to the top.
     
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  5. pushing_wins

    pushing_wins Hall of Fame

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    i have read a "normal" can ski it with some instructions. how likely is serious injury for a normal skier?

    no deaths so far

    i have skied front front at stowe. i turn right much better than turning left. do u think i can make it? i m worried about the first left turn.
     
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  6. pushing_wins

    pushing_wins Hall of Fame

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    not off piste....100' drop in...are you nuts?

    corbet is 10-30 foot to drop in to a 50-60 degree landing and 3 tight turns

    from the videos, chute75 is not a chute nor steep, probably 30 degrees
     
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  7. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    That was why I put ski in quotes. Most people who are relatively competent skiers will be able to get down it and this time of year it isn't a mandatory air (dependent on the season's snowfall). If you aren't airing it, you've got a short steep icy patch to side slip down, followed by a very quick turn (still on ice), followed by a few more icy turns where you are scrubbing speed until it flattens out and gets in the sun. Most people fall in the first 2-3 turns because of the ice and steepness, but it opens up immediately after the first turn and all that happens is you take a long ride down the ice followed by a hike back up to get your skis. There is always a chance if injury, but odds are it will be to your pride from a large group of people seeing it happen and groaning as you slide.

    Like I said before, I don't think it's worth skiing it, but it will be a thrill and you can check it off you bucket list. You should still go to the top and look over the edge and stop below it to watch the carnage......always a good time.
     
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  8. Fed Kennedy

    Fed Kennedy Hall of Fame

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    Wait for fresh snow. Its not that bad. Slide in, you will hit the bad snow first, then you are in the clear. If you are a weekend warrior/ out of shape skip it.

    I hit it on a epic first tram day at jackson. It was like butter. Out west it is similar to main chute at squaw palisades. Although corbets has a much longer, steeper runout.
     
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  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Chute 75 is arguably the steepest sustained pitch at SquawValley. Not OlyLady, not Headwall, not Westface, not GraniteChief.
    The drop in from the top, not the W side, is usually more than 40' air time.
    Is Squaw supposed to be steep.
    30 degrees? That's like the top of ShirleyLake! Even Exhibition, where they hold all sorts of bump contests, is around 35 degrees sustained, and it's NOTHING near Chute75.
     
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  10. pushing_wins

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    Pro skier Cody Townsend never tires of Squaw Valley's Chute 75.

    "Chute 75 is one of the most infamous runs at the legendary Squaw Valley," he says.

    "From fresh powder to spring slush, it skis well in nearly all conditions and sustains a pitch of 35 degrees for nearly 1,500 vertical feet.

    "From the challenging cornice entrance to the narrow choke halfway down, Chute 75 is a challenge for any advanced skier."

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/13/travel/worlds-best-ski-runs/

    from the video below..chute75 just looks like the stuff out east...i wouldnt hesitate

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkLy4cI_FGM
     
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  11. pushing_wins

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    i dun mind the ice or the steepness, but the rock walls are very intimidating.
     
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  12. Fed Kennedy

    Fed Kennedy Hall of Fame

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    If you can ski east coast ice you can ski corbets. You wont hit the rocks.

    Chute 75 is just a basic run at squaw. Its steep at the top. Thats it.

    Tennis is harder than skiing. Skiing is 99 percent balls.
     
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  13. Fed Kennedy

    Fed Kennedy Hall of Fame

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    Lee, I'm sorry but this is just bad information
     
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  14. pushing_wins

    pushing_wins Hall of Fame

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    you are not really risking anything in tennis. how is it harder?

    i feel that unless you can ski something like corbet you cant really call yourself a skier. its not for ego, pride, bucket list etc
     
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  15. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    Well....you know.....there's a first time for everything.
     
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  16. spaceman_spiff

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    Well, with skiing you don't have an opponent intentionally trying to make you fail. Also, you can stop and take as much time as you want to scope out your line, and you can ski that line at whatever pace you like. If you end up not liking your line for whatever reason, you can find another one or often you can traverse out of the particular slope you're in altogether.

    In tennis, a lot of your options are limited by your opponent (assuming that you're playing a decent opponent).

    FWIW, I skied the top of the Valluga in St. Anton last Wednesday in whiteout conditions. Here's what it looks like in good visibility http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pl23cdnM4ZY.
     
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  17. Hitman99

    Hitman99 Rookie

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    Corbet's Couloir is not in Canada, it is at Jackson Hole. It's not really death-defying, just looks that way from the top. However, anyone can be badly injured if they ski into the rocks at speed. just sayin'... :twisted:
     
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  18. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Guys.
    35 degrees for 1,500 feet.
    Compared to 40 degrees for 150'.
    Which is more difficult?
    The normal entry into Chute75 is to ride past the top, enter from the W side, so there is no drop. The drop from the top is easy 40' air.
    The drop at DonnerSkiRanch, under the big chair going to the top, is 65'.
     
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  19. Fed Kennedy

    Fed Kennedy Hall of Fame

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    In this video you can see a wide level of abilities "do" corbets. As you can see, its possible to just slide in, bang out a turn and be home free.

    Or you could do a backflip. :)
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dYcgruURzQg
     
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  20. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Most of the drops are around 40'. One guy took off higher.
    But, 40 degrees is not a whole lot scarier than 35 degrees.
    But, 1,500 feet is a whole lot more daunting than merely 150'.
    Anyone here ski Squaw? You can attest to what I say.
    Jumping off the bridge between Headwall and Cornice, taking the E side, is an easy 20' drop into MOGUL's.
    The drop into Siberia from the top of Headwall chair, bit of a hike W, can be anything from 10' to well over 50'.
    Sorry, I haven't skied since '84 or so, before those new steeper runs at Squaw were opened.
     
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  21. GRANITECHIEF

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    Corbets (and Jackson in general) is awesome. Much better conditions this year than in CA where the epic drought has kept me from getting a decent powder day yet.

    I live on KT22, of course, its the mother ship. My favorite run is the nose to fingers.

    Fingers are awesome: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=MIKhbc_-jmM#t=25

    Chute 75 has a nice fall line and you can pop a nice air into it in a few spots but nothing too big. Just down the traverse at dead tree is where a bigger drop in air can be found. But oh man on a pow day 75 is where I go first, such a long sustained fall line pitch. I also like the alternates, more than Chute 75 as seen here:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=3xMa6yEraSI#t=77

    Corbets would be more comparable to Granite Chief Peak, direct chute. I wimp dropped into here:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=3xMa6yEraSI#t=32

    Palisades / Chimney at Squaw are a little more gnar in my opinion.

    http://youtu.be/oxl5uLoH0TA

    But anyone getting to experience any of the above is pretty lucky.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2014
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  22. sapient007

    sapient007 Semi-Pro

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    no shame in wimping out on corbets. i wussed out too. literally talked trash all trip up to jackson and no one, i mean no one, from my group actually did it. stood there for a good 20-30min watching yard sales and took the trail down. there's supposed an even steeper chute in jackson which a waiver is needed.
     
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  23. Fed Kennedy

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    S&S couloir. Pretty gnarly.
     
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  24. pushing_wins

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    Like fed kennedy said, i dont think its possible to hit the walls. i think if you lose an edge you just tumble down the fall line. Its so steep, the momentum will pull you down the fall line. if there is any possibility of hitting the walls, i dont think the corporate types at jackson hole would allow it as a marked trail.
     
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  25. pushing_wins

    pushing_wins Hall of Fame

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evBZfdT1LgU

    is this chimney? that just jumping off a cliff and landing. thats not really skiing. idk

    did u ski corbet?
     
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  26. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    If you really know how to ski steeps confidently, then the length of the slope shouldn't matter. So in that sense, if you can ski a 35-degree slope well, then it shouldn't matter to you if it's 150 ft or 1500 ft.

    On the other hand, if you slip and slide your way down in survival mode, then it would make sense that a longer slope would be more daunting. The longer you go in survival mode, the less likely you are to survive.
     
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  27. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Sounds plausable, but it's not.... SpacemanSpiff.
    Think of this.... 1 60 drop, sheer with rocks all the way down until the landing.
    But the landing is perfect easy deep snow, within 2 blocks of the lodge, perfect gradual flattenning, and directly under a beginner level chair.
    This describes the jump at DonnerSkiRanch in California. Is it hard?
    I say, a 12' sheer drop out in the backcountry is much harder, where nobody normally ski's or board's.
     
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  28. spaceman_spiff

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    That's like saying that a 60' drop in Colorado is easier than a 12' drop in Utah. It doesn't matter where the jump is or what's farther down the hill. The only things that matter when it comes to jumping are the distance of the fall and the landing area.

    I also get the impression that you're underestimating just how big 60' is. Go outside and take 60 steps heel to toe. Then, imagine that same distance going straight up in the air. That's a hell of a drop. Unless the 12' drop has a truly horrendous landing area, like a bunch of jagged rocks with a tree in the middle, then I'll take the 12' drop in the backcountry every time. The only thing that's easier about the 60' drop next to the lodge is your journey in the patroller's sled when it all goes wrong.

    As for skiing, if you have two slopes that have the same angle and snow conditions, and assuming that you're not just going to straight line them, then the length of the slopes doesn't affect the technical difficulty. If you can do one run in 10 turns and the other in 50, they're both technically the same; one just takes longer to finish.

    The only test that the longer slope might offer is for your stamina. Then again, you can always stop and rest if you need to.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2014
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  29. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Are you sure you actually ski/snowboard?
    Read what your wrote again, or for the first time.
    Yes, a big drop right into your lodge, with an easy landing, is much safer and more comfortable than a backcountry 12' drop off a rock where no one else has jumped. In the backcountry, not only are you on your own, but you haven't dropped that jump lately, so you don't know the landing.
    Yes, I skied from top of SugarBowl's new 2 chairs down to almost DonnerLake. That requires at least 7 big blind drops. Of course, with 6 other guys who have done it before.
    That was WAAAAAYYY heavier than going the 60'er under chair 3 at DonnerSkiRanch, because at Donner, at least 20 guys were making the drop, always a line of 3-5 guys, during a snowboard trade show in '95 and lots of snow that year.
     
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  30. GRANITECHIEF

    GRANITECHIEF Hall of Fame

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    Ya thats Chimmney, thats pretty much what is done in Corbets. No I didn't ski it, i was there a long time ago, before I was an instructor at Squaw for 5 seasons. I would drop it now.
     
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  31. jdubbs

    jdubbs Hall of Fame

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    I actually did ski Corbets, back when I was 18. I sat and looked at it for about 45 minutes before coming off the top and jump turning onto solid ice. Ouch, but my young knees could handle it. Then skied the rest of the run falling about 3 times. My friend jumped in after me and had a yard sale for about 100 yards.

    Jackson is one of my favorite resorts ever, only Squaw has more inbounds extreme terrain open to the public.
     
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  32. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I once had a yard sale at WestFace, after telling my bud it's really easy after the first 3 turns. Second turn, right ski released, ski stoppers, and I slid, bounced, cartwheeled, and pogo sticked almost all the way down to the flatter bottom, MountainRun, about 800' below my lost ski.....:cry::cry: Long crawl half way up, to meet my sideslipping, ski saving bud in the middle.
     
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  33. pushing_wins

    pushing_wins Hall of Fame

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    do you buy a lift ticket when you ski? day pass at squaw is 100 bucks!
     
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  34. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    You're assuming that I'm dumb enough to jump off a rock/cliff without knowing what's beneath it.

    I ski in the Alps, and anyone who's skied the Alps will know that they can kill you in a hurry, even within the resort boundaries. Because of that, I only drop off rocks/cliffs if I know that the landing is safe, regardless of whether or not I'm within the resort boundaries. So, given that I'll only jump something if I know the landing is safe, the 12' drop is always easier than the 60' drop.

    Now, if you're going to blindly jump off stuff without scoping out the landing, then it's probably a good idea to stay close to the resort base. Like I said before, it's a shorter ride in the patroller's sled when you're already close to the bottom.

    But if you actually want to talk about skiing/boarding rather than blindly jumping off stuff, then a steep slope is a steep slope regardless of how long it is or where it is. The only thing that really matters is the snow condition. If you really know how to ski/board steeps, then the only reasons that the length of a slope should be a cause for concern are if you think you don't have the stamina or if you're pressed for time (i.e., need to get somewhere in a hurry). Other than that, it shouldn't matter to you if it's 10 turns or 50 turns.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2014
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  35. pushing_wins

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    would it make a difference if the steep was really narrow like at corbet?
     
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  36. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    If a couloir is narrow enough, it will limit your options in terms of what types of turns you can make. But if you know how to make short/jump turns within a narrow area, then it's not a problem. If you don't know how to make turns like that, then you might be in trouble depending on just how narrow it is.

    For example, here's the Couloir des Pisteurs in Val d'Isere http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=69BziiNdKFI&feature=player_detailpage#t=31. On the top half, you don't have many options when it comes to turns. But, the people in the video know how to handle it, so it's all good for them.
     
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  37. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    While this makes perfect sense and is mostly an unarguable point, I'm sure there is an anecdote about motocross in the 70's that will prove you wrong and uninformed. Sorry.
     
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  38. GRANITECHIEF

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    Not totally unarguable.

    The length of a steep slope actually does matter a bit, especially in hard fast snow condition, the kind where if you fall, you start sliding down the hill. The less length you have to slide, the less potential danger there is for tumbling or hitting obstacles. Therefore a steep slope is less dangerous the shorter it is, due to reduced potential energy.

    PS, starting to get excited about a potential snowfall event in the sierra 1 week out! Bring it, I still have to get 10 days this winter to cover my season pass!
     
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  39. spaceman_spiff

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    That depends on the existence and location of potentially dangerous objects. A short slope with rocks or a cliff nearby is more dangerous than a long slope with nothing around.

    Also, if you're skiing a slope in conditions where you can't self arrest if you fall, then it's probably not a good idea to be skiing that slope. To me, that's right up there with skiing off piste in an area with a high avalanche danger.

    Enjoy the snow. Watch out for snow sharks.
     
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  40. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Jump turns is the key to skiing any kind of steeps, even with modern short 160cm ski's.
    There is no carving if your goal is to control your speed. Just like bump skiing, it's basically air turns, from a quick push off the outside heel of your foot, translating to the back of binding are of the ski.
    Head and torso fall line, the lower body pivoting off the waist/hips.
    And yes, Spaceman is somewhat correct, Chute75 is not that tough, since I skied it, RedDog, HeadWall, both backsides of Emmigrant, and OlympicLady my 10th day of skiing.
     
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  41. Sumo

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    160.....What are you talking about?

    Unless really worried about weight, no one who is needing to jump turn is skiing on anything close to that.
     
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  42. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    160 cm....
    I don't use ski's that short. Newest pair, 170cm SolomonScreams. That is supposed to be TOO LONG for me, at 5'11" and 148 lbs. Most ski shop salesman would recomend 160's. NOTE my weight.
    Previous new skis, SpauldingMytery, 195 for mogul skiing, HexellSundance205's, DyastarOmeglass207's, RossiStratos200's.
    In world cup slalom, the men are using 165's.
     
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  43. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    Oh, I know what the number meant, I was just blown away by what you said.

    That whole statement is so outdated. It's like you haven't taken in any new info since the late 90's.
     
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  44. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    So, is using a 160 cm ski, at 5'11" and 148 lbs. ,old school thinking?
    Hows about, in 1973, my backup powder skis were Head 170's, as wide as today's shovels, and wider in the waist than anything made for hardpack today.
    Main pow ski was HauteRoutes, of course, 187's, that also worked great for mogul skiing, if it wasn't icy.
    My SolomonScreams ARE about 5 years old, new enough for me.
     
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  45. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    Why do you own skis that are only "5 years old"?

    And yes....160 for an adult male, especially one with "LeeD abilities," is way too short for anything other than slalom.
     
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  46. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Geez, for the 3rd time, my 2007 SolomonScreams are 170 cm...:mad::mad:
    All you beginners think it's possible to carve steep hills. It is NOT, unless it's perfectly groomed, and you're prepared to hit light speeds. That's my reference of 160, for a carving slalom ski.
    Why buy those skis? Well, I was getting tired of snowboarding, have 6 snowboards, one asym race, one carve, one powder, one shorter powder, and two freeride/pipe. The Solomon rep used to ski with me, back in the mid '70's, and offered pro form, 20% below wholesale, about 45% of retail. Couldn't pass it up, as I was planning to ski again. They and their bindings are still brand new, rusty in my storage container, I'd guess.
     
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  47. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    Do you even know what year it is?
     
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  48. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    More riddles? What's your point?
    Last year, windsurfing with TysonPoor, US545, the national champ in slalom who called me to ask if I was coming to the BerkeleyMarina that day before he was leaving for Nationals in LA, I sailed with him (his 2013 JPSlalom108 and NeilPrydeRS-8 full slalom sail, 7.8, on my 2000 Seatrend and 1997 NorthPyro6.0
    Going about 1.5 miles, he'd pull maybe 40' on me. On the slalom marks, we were holding place, neither can pass, neither can pull away.
    Tyson is the NationalChampion in slalom, 6'2" and 178 lbs, 26 years old.

    What's your point?
     
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  49. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    I guess I just like math.
     
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  50. GRANITECHIEF

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    It looks like the first wave will push into the West coast later in the day on Wednesday into Thursday. This first wave isn't looking all that impressive with the main flow going from South to North and not much push into the mountains. The latest GFS run is colder with this feature coming more in line with the other models. It looks like we could see snow down near lake level with several inches of snow. We will have to keep watching snow levels and how much precip could push into the basin.

    Long-Range:

    A much stronger storm looks like it could push in by next Friday as the large area of low pressure approaches the West coast. There could be several waves of precip into the weekend of the 1st. This system would have much more moisture with it. It is too early to look at snow levels and snowfall amounts, but looking at the models this morning it they are showing snow levels falling below lake level with this system and enough liquid for several feet of snow. Here is the Canadian total precip forecast for the next 10 days. Notice that most of CA could get precip with this system.
     
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