Anyone try these stringing procedures on crosses?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by eagle, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. eagle

    eagle Hall of Fame

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    Hi,

    Just wondering if anyone has tried to string crosses starting in the middle like doing the mains and then working towards the sides? Would this cause damage or deformation of the racquet?

    Also, instead of starting from the head, has anyone tried to start the mains about 3 or 4 slots down and work back towards the head and then tie off? Why? Avoid having to use a starting clamp that could slip or damage the string.

    Your input would be appreciate.

    r,
    eagle
     
    #1
  2. nViATi

    nViATi Hall of Fame

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    Probably wouldn't be a good idea. It would be like starting throat to head.
     
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  3. David Pavlich

    David Pavlich Professional

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    A pattern named 50-50 is done by starting the crosses in the middle and working back and forth to each end. Frankly, it's a pain in the neck.

    David
     
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  4. eagle

    eagle Hall of Fame

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    Thanks Dave.

    I will give it a try for kicks. :) I will also give the 2nd procedure a try.

    Thanks,
    eagle
     
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  5. 156MPHserve

    156MPHserve Professional

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    Where do you start the mains if you don't start from the middle? (confused)

    Also, for the crosses, it wouldn't be that bad an idea to start from the middle. However, stringing from top to bottom or bottom to top, depending on what the pattern calls for, will always be better, because the starting knot holds tension the best. when you tie a starting knot and then string, you are guaranteed not to lose any tension. However if you start from the middle, then you will have to do two tie-off knots. Thus you will lose tension on the top and bottom strings where normally you only lose tension on the side with the tie-off. So I would recommend you not start from the middle. That's my 2 cents.
     
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  6. dmastous

    dmastous Professional

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    No confusion here. In reading through the posts I don't see where anyone suggested they do anything but stringing the mains from the middle out. I think, for racquet integrity, that is the only proper way to do the mains.
    As for doing the crosses from the middle, I never did that. But before I learned to properly do 2 piece jobs, I used to start the cross about 3 holes from the start, worked back to where the tie-off knot belonged, then continued on with the rest of the crosses.
    I don't know how not using a starting knot would effect tension if you are not starting to pull tension using the knot as an anchor. That causes more pulling pressure on the knot than in a tie-off situation, and if it's not beefy enough it will pull through the grommet (had that happen once:oops: ). With the idea of starting the crosses in the middle I don't see the need for a "starting" knot as opposed to a normal tie-off.
     
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  7. Valjean

    Valjean Hall of Fame

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    It's sort of important to determine if people objecting to 50-50 stringing have anything good to say about two-piece first, since the two are intertwined.

    Several in here believe that 50-50 stringing, pioneered or introduced by the French, can produce a more uniform stringbed and hence more consistent play. Two racquet manufacturers, Head and Yonex, have lately forbidden it in order to ensure the crosses in their racquets are being strung top-down, when called for.

    It's not really so difficult, or more time-consuming than two-piece per sae, and you really owe it to yourself to give it a try.
     
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  8. LoveThisGame

    LoveThisGame Professional

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    Regarding stringing the mains other than middle to outside:

    Racquetball frames, which have lower tension specs YET can withstand much higher tension (as cited to me by a frame tech person) do have some variation on this. Head and E-Force current models exhibit this. They do tend to get one center main string tensioned first, though.
     
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  9. dmastous

    dmastous Professional

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    The Ektelon Power Ring racquets are a PAIN to string. By the time you get to the throat you are literally sewing the cross strings.
     
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  10. 156MPHserve

    156MPHserve Professional

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    No but the point is, you're guaranteed to lose tension on the tie-off. Only way not to lose tension is by using the starting knot as an anchor. Also you should leave about 2 inches more for the starting knot so that one isn't enough to anchor, then you can do one more for good measure.

    The reason to string top-down, is because the bottom part (throat) is much more sturdier than the top because it has support from the throat. The side you end with takes more stress than the side you start with, that's why manuafacturers want you to string top down, because this unsures the top of the racquet doesn't have to take the stress caused by ending on it.

    This is why I'm a big fan of stringing top down. First you lose less tension because you only have one tie-off, second it's safer for the racquet. A racquet goes takes so much stress during the stringing process, I try to relieve it of as much as possible.
     
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  11. dmastous

    dmastous Professional

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    You are going to loose tension on any tie-off knot. That's why some advocate adding 3-5 lbs to the tension on the last string before each tie-off.
    As for stringing top to bottom, no arguement there. I try to do that when ever possible.
    There are a couple racquets listed that specify one piece stringing. I don't remember if their crosses ended up being done bottom to top. I'll have to check my digest.
     
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  12. Valjean

    Valjean Hall of Fame

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    Of course it's a good idea to protect the racquet frame--yet only those two manufacturers I've named are so cautious as you. 50-50 stringing is a technique the USRSA sponsors, by the way; it's in their manual, too. And many racquets list the option for two-piece installation, and several others must be installed that way--just as hybrid string sets require it..

    If you recognize enough that stringers and the way they string can affect play in desirable ways, maybe you pay attention to the innovations and nuances others rely on, and perhaps adopt some.
     
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  13. LoveThisGame

    LoveThisGame Professional

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    dmastous, Ektelon Power Ring aren't so bad so long as you don't pre-string the mains in advance. The Prince TT Ring is a bit worse; they start the mains at the throat (!) and have a greater fanning of the mains.

    E-Force, Head, and the Ektelon DPR 2500 initially (and some of them continuously) an adventure. A few frames show ignorance of stringing aspects, such 1) as an inner valley which pretty much guarantees extra loose tension when tying off and 2) CROSS strings rounding the bend internal to the frame, thereby requiring tensioning to use brake, the string to go over/under the frame, and the clamp to be backed off to the last main because of the slanting string.
     
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