APD and tennis elbow issues

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by ohcaptain, Apr 19, 2013.

  1. ohcaptain

    ohcaptain Rookie

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    Hi,

    I'm having tennis elbow issues :| again after years of no problems at all.
    The thing is that i mooved to APD a couple months ago.

    As it's a quite rigid racquet i'm thinking there might be a relationship.

    Previously i used much more flexible (and heavier) racquets: wilson six one 95, tecnifibre tfight 320....

    Anyone experienced problems like this?
    Anyone sees a pattern?

    Thanks,
    Rui
     
    #1
  2. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    Yeah bro, that's pretty common. Either drop the poly or grab a new stick.
     
    #2
  3. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    If you do a search on this board you'll find plenty of people who have injured their arms using the APD (as well as many other Babolat racquets). Yes, the APD is both very stiff and very light, which is the perfect recipe for tennis elbow. And using poly strings just escalates the problem and makes it much worse.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2013
    #3
  4. phishbiscuits

    phishbiscuits Rookie

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    Low RA, NO POLY!!!

    The RA on Babolats (save the Pure Storms like the Ltd GT) are incredibly high...

    The stiffness of the poly is also a crucial problem for your medical condition.

    So, flexible racquet (think Babolat Pure Storm Ltd GT if you insist on Babolat), or those with RA's in the low 60s, or ideally, high 50s. I found that Völkl's PowerBridge 10 Mid is nice and flexible, as are some of Donnay's X-series frames. If you have some extra money to waste, go with a foam-filled frame like the Angell TC-95. Foam absorbs more shock. Which brings me to utilizing an effective vibration dampener and a comfortable compression brace.

    Low-tensioned, soft nylon or multis- check the ratings of your strings that you select, for example, here:

    http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/articles/2012/01/string_selector_2012.html

    Or, just go full gut for a while and isolate the issue. If you change racquets and strings and the condition persists, it's either something serious, or you have technique deficiencies that require correction.
     
    #4
  5. ohcaptain

    ohcaptain Rookie

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    Thanks everyone.
    I use tecnifibre Black Code which i find pretty confortable string.
    Let's see if i can handle this or if i have to really think of changing racquets :|
     
    #5
  6. Lilguy1456

    Lilguy1456 Semi-Pro

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    If my racquet/string combo is too stiff, I develop problems too. But I find that I can use a very firm poly and have NO issue if my racquet RA is low 60s or lower, no problem. I would rather give up the stiff racquet than give up poly! Plus, what kind of clown puts a multi in an APD!? :)
     
    #6
  7. acura9927

    acura9927 Semi-Pro

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    Head Extreme Pro is you want the spin like a APD, just heavier and without question not as light to swing.
     
    #7
  8. maxrenn

    maxrenn Hall of Fame

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    I think you were being sarcastic but if not I was wondering why would multi be bad in an APD?
     
    #8
  9. cluckcluck

    cluckcluck Hall of Fame

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    It's the stiffness. Try and sell it and get a Head Radical Pro or even Extreme.
     
    #9
  10. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Please do your homework before purchasing a racquet. Please!
     
    #10
  11. acura9927

    acura9927 Semi-Pro

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    Its all Nadal's fault and his elbow made of steel.
     
    #11
  12. usta2050

    usta2050 Rookie

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    switch to a blx pro open.
     
    #12
  13. usta2050

    usta2050 Rookie

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    you don't really need to use your own body to test APD + POLY. hundreds of people on this board already have. people who are prone to elbow/wrist issues should avoid APD. yes, sometime it will give u more match wins but it's not worth the potential injuries.
     
    #13
  14. dgoran

    dgoran Hall of Fame

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    I blame babolat. Rafa's actual APD rather is 65. What's babolat offering to paying public is downright criminal with ra of over 70...
     
    #14
  15. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    Ya right black code is really going to save you. Either drop the bab or the poly if you don't want to get full blown TE. Remember that for most people with a tendency to have elbow problems babolat+poly is a big mistake.
     
    #15
  16. Lilguy1456

    Lilguy1456 Semi-Pro

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    APD is definitely designed for a poly. A racquet with decent power designed SPECIFICALLY for spin. Would be a waste/shame to put a full multi in there.
     
    #16
  17. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    No, this will not solve it. I get TE occasionally with my pro open strung with full bed of poly. 62 ra or lower will help the OP to not get TE.
     
    #17
  18. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    Sorry to hear that you're having problems....

    But don't forget to actually TREAT your elbow/arm, don't just switch racket/strings and expect to never get TE again.

    There's plenty of threads in the Health & Fitness section about TE/GE with treatment options, I'd suggest you read up on them.

    Don't forget about arm flexibility and breaking up muscle spasms/knots/trigger points.
     
    #18
  19. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    I can see how apd and tight poly could hurt many of its owners. I try to be careful and sound with my strokes but occassionally I also feel some tightness bordering problem but never got there.

    I'm curious..how many of you use 50# poly tension and have TE problem?
     
    #19
  20. ArliHawk

    ArliHawk Hall of Fame

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    I had the same experience, even with a multi. After moving to a Volkl Organix V1 and it had been smooth sailing ever since.
     
    #20
  21. spinovic

    spinovic Hall of Fame

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    I agree. I've tried both and the Extreme Pro 2.0 is currently my racquet of choice. Great spin, roughly 1/2 ounce heavier than the APD and does not feel and play as stiff as its rating. That's my opinion with Sonic Pro strung at 60 lbs.

    If you don't want the extra weight, the Radical Pro is a similar weight to the APD, but its SW gives it a heftier feel, IMO. Definitely a softer racquet. It is 95 in head though, don't know if that matters or not.

    I think either would be an excellent alternative. Obviously, I'd suggest the Extreme, but I'm biased. I think it is "closer" to the APD.
     
    #21
  22. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    "Clowns" who want to look like Nadal but also still want to have functioning arms when they get older.
     
    #22
  23. hersito

    hersito Rookie

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    You never tried a multi on an APD right? go try a good multi at around 54 on an apd and then we will talk.

    To op, use multi and the problem will go away or try poly at 50.
     
    #23
  24. usta2050

    usta2050 Rookie

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    I agree. a full bed of poly is not good with the open
     
    #24
  25. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    The exemplar of Nadal's racquet that Raven measured was only 65 stiffness. The GT version is stiffer.
     
    #25
  26. ohcaptain

    ohcaptain Rookie

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    I have the Microgel radical pro ;) but mine is 100'', right?
     
    #26
  27. naturallight

    naturallight Rookie

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    I loved my APDC's but I had to switch out after 3 years...arm would be wrecked by mid-summer. I was hoping it was just the poly string but switching to a multi didn't help much. Demo'd a few other (stiff) racquets and came to the conclusion it's something with the Bab handles--they felt very hollow and prone to vibration compared to other manufacturers' handles. Bummer.
     
    #27
  28. eidolonshinobi

    eidolonshinobi Professional

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    please people, ya'll need to read up/research what causes tennis elbow. Seriously guys, just because it looks cool or a pro uses it (rather markets it) doesn't mean you should use it.

    If a racket has a high stiffness rating pleaseee...unless you have proper stroke mechanics...opt for another racquet.

    ya'll just hurting yourselves.
     
    #28
  29. tmc5005

    tmc5005 Rookie

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    There is absolutely a connection. Racquet stiffness is the most important component of a racquet that can cause arm problems. My list of top ten arm friendly racquets all have an RA flex rating of 63 or less.

    They currently include the following racquets:

    Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95)
    DUNLOP Biomimetic Max 200G
    Dunlop Biomimetic 200 (95)
    HEAD-Youtek-IG-Prestige-MP
    Prince EXO3 Rebel (95)
    Prince EXO3 Tour (100) 16 x 18
    Volkl Power Bridge-10 Mid (93)
    Volkl Organix 10 325G
    Wilson Prostaff Six.One BLX (95)
    Yonex Vcore 95D
     
    #29
  30. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Don't forget the Boris Becker Delta Core Legend. It's one of the most arm-friendly frames in the market.
     
    #30
  31. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I've had to deal with arm issues too after getting the APDGT and using poly strings. Now I'm using a Pro Kennex strung with gut or multifilament, which addresses all the equipment issues.

    In my opinion, poly strings seem to be the bigger problem. If you like your APD and still want some spin, try a textured multifilament like RIP Control or Dunlop Hexy Fiber, or better yet, try RIP Control mains with Hexy Fiber crosses (one of my favorite setups).
     
    #31
  32. spinovic

    spinovic Hall of Fame

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    I thought they were 98 inch as listed until reading on here that the Prestige and Radicals were actually a little less (about 3 inches) than their specs list.

    If you have a Microgel Radical Pro and an APD, it shouldn't be hard to tell.
     
    #32
  33. tmc5005

    tmc5005 Rookie

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    I agree I only removed the Boris Becker Delta Core Legend because it is so difficult to find and or demo one now.
     
    #33
  34. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

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    I don't know what prompted the OP to move to APD, but as the old saying goes: if it ain't broken don't fix it. Go back to your original rackets that were comfortable. Why on earth would you change?
     
    #34
  35. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    If every tennis player adhered to this philosophy, all the racquet companies would go out of business. :shock:
     
    #35
  36. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    Strings, strings, strings! They are the most important thing to a tennis player. Find the strings that you like and stick with them. If it happens to be poly, then so be it. If that's the case, then find a softer frame to put the poly in.

    Point is, the racquet is actually not that important. As long as it meets a few requirements that are in your "wheelhouse", such as:
    static weight
    swing weight
    string pattern
    balance

    then it doesn't really matter what label is on it. I'm sure there's a softer frame that meets your needs. But don't compromise by keeping the frame and choosing softer nylon strings. It's the strings that touch the ball, not the frame.
     
    #36
  37. RetroSpin

    RetroSpin Hall of Fame

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    Those sticks seem to appear here regularly as among the favorites of many who like players' frames. I really want to try out a few on the list, particularly the Vcore 95D and Prestige.

    I'm using a 4D200 T, which would head the list if they still made them. I really wonder what passes for decision-making at Dunlop. They have a total classic frame and cancel it. Compare that to Head or Bab, which keep their signature frames going year after year.
     
    #37
  38. martini1

    martini1 Hall of Fame

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    The APDC used to be my main stick. No TE issue whatsoever with poly/gut hybrid, no problem at all with full bed of multi. Had a little bit of elbow pain (but most likely due to hyper extension) with a poly/Nvy hybrid.

    When in doubt, use gut hybrid and string @52-48. If cost is an issue use a full bed of multi but beware of drop tension or breakage.

    The other end of the equation is your grip pressure and swing. I know for a fact if you don't forearm or use a straight arm fh you will be fine. 2hbh is also 100x better for your TE than 1hbh.
     
    #38
  39. kazamzaa

    kazamzaa Rookie

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    I have to second that. Apdgt & poly -> TE. Played with many different racquets. Finally found home at Pro Kennex ki5 315 & Tonic ballfeel / CoFocus 17 at 57/53.

    The thing was that I tried to find arm friendly racquet that offered the same things to my game than apdgt. It was difficult, but I finally made it after 2 years.
    Demo the ki5 315 !
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
    #39
  40. Doubles

    Doubles Hall of Fame

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    and get ready for Break Point to retort in 3, 2, 1...
     
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  41. ohcaptain

    ohcaptain Rookie

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    Hi.
    I used Babolat several years ago (pd) but moved into more "player racquets", Wilson six one 95, tecnifibre tfight 320, head radical pro... but a few months ago I've decided that a move to a racquet that helps me more would be good. So APD.

    Btw just hit some balls today after 3 days rest, and no pain at all :)) (also I never had pain outside the court)
     
    #41
  42. kazamzaa

    kazamzaa Rookie

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    Maybe you just have a mild case of TE or something. Maybe it is possible for you to pull it off just using only fresh polys.
    But understanding what kind of racquets you like (pd & apd) I would say pk ki5 315 is perfect for you. Their elbow protection system actually works. Unlike cortex system.
    Just listen to your body carefully. I tried to play through the pain and ended up having 15 months of TE.
     
    #42
  43. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    martini1 is exactly right. Hitting 1HBHs is the easiest way to develop tennis elbow. It would be pretty difficult to develop TE from hitting 2HBHs. However, you have to watch out for off-hand wrist injuries from hitting 2HBHs, like many pros with 2HBHs have suffered. Golfer's elbow OTOH, is caused mostly from hitting forehands and serves.
     
    #43
  44. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Extremely arm-friendly racquets like the Delta Core Legend compensate for this. Hitting off-center can still be an issue if performed frequently.
     
    #44

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