Are stringing fees too cheap?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by dak95_00, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    I was thinking about this today. Are we charging too little for our services? Back in the late 80s, I started to break strings and remember paying the club to string my POG 90 w/ Prince Pro Blend $28 to string my racquet. I feel I could easily get my racquet strung today for the same or less; $11 for the string and $17 for the labor might even be high.

    Why?

    Back then, the POG was an expensive racquet at $129-149. Today, a new racquet is closer to $199 for a new frame. You'd had to buy a Prince Boron w/ a full leather cover to pay that much; it might've cost $299. I really can't remember.

    I just feel as though Wendy's $0.99 menu is the only thing that has changed as little as stringing fees. Even their menu prices are changing. The Junior Bacon Cheeseburger is no longer $0.99.

    When will stringing fees go up? It seems to me that the hacks on the street should be charging at least $20 for labor and clubs $30.

    Thoughts?
     
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  2. rdis10093

    rdis10093 Hall of Fame

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    nope, I have paid between 1 and 42 dollars before for string jobs, ( one time my friend charged me a dollar.) and that is with string provided.
     
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  3. gtshark1

    gtshark1 Rookie

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    There is one tennis shop in my city/metro area. They charge $14 for Syn Gut and $16 for Poly. I have a good relationship with them so I don't advertise that I string but I do string for my players and lesson clients. I charge a flat $10 plus cost of string. I'd be happier getting around $15 for labor but I couldn't charge the same as the specialty shop.
     
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  4. cluckcluck

    cluckcluck Hall of Fame

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    It really all depends on who's doing the stringing. If it's the kid down the street who just does it to earn a bit of money to take out his girlfriend, then the cost should be cheap.
    But if you get somebody like myself who believes stringing is an art and I care about the quality of my work, then the price goes up.
    It's all a matter of what you're getting...quality over quantity.
     
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  5. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

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    I understand what you are saying. My question is why hasn't the price changed in 30 years? Has the cost of a 30 minute tennis lesson changed? Why wouldn't the cost of stringing change too? Are we charging too little? What about the cost of a stringing machine?

    There is a thread in the Classic Racquets section asking if we (the TT community) drive up the costs of classic or collector racquets. I believe we do. What will it take for us to drive up the cost of stringing labor? It seems to me a person had better be stringing a lot of racquets to be able to afford an expensive machine to pay off its costs and justify it. Let's say you bought the newest Star. How many racquets do you have to string to break even at $15 labor/racquet and how do you break down that $15; actual labor and cost to buy/maintain the equipment? Feel free to replace the $15 with your actual charge. I understand ratios and proportion.
     
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  6. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    I agree with OP. Stringing fees compared to everything else in the market has for the most part stayed the same. We were discussing this with a client at the shop the other day who was complaining about the price of having his racquet strung. When he realized the price has stayed the same for the past 25 years, he had nothing to say.
     
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  7. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

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    Around here (upstate, NY) I don't see how anyone could make a living stringing tennis racquets.

    The going rate is ~$20/racquet. The stringer has to do 3~4000 jobs per year for $60-80K gross. I don't think there are 3~4000 tennis players in the area.

    That said, If an experienced stringer can do a job in 30 minutes for $20. That's close to what a master carpenter, auto mechanic, plumber earns around these parts.
     
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  8. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    It does seem rather cheap, but on the other hand it's done in tennis shops in tennis centres where I live and there are always people floating about so it seems a part of an overall business that is profitable.

    Most people probably buy the string from the people who string it, which would make it reasonably profitable.
     
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  9. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    It would be the same price where I live but carpenters and plumbers earn far more than that $40 an hour around here.



     
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  10. themitchmann

    themitchmann Hall of Fame

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    I charge $20 labor plus cost of string (I don't mark it up at all). I think it's fair given my level of experience.
     
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  11. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

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    30~$50/hr around here which is $60-100K/year if they can keep reasonably busy. The good ones (especially finish carpenters) can make much more than that. Handymen get $200 for an 8 Hr day ($25/hr). They charge $80/hr for auto mechanics but I think the mechanic gets ~1/2 of that. Average household income (which includes single kids living on their own) is $40K/year.
     
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  12. OHBH

    OHBH Semi-Pro

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    The reason the cost of stringing is so low is that everybody and their brother has a stringer these days. Out of the serious rec players in my area I would say 1 in 5 of them have a stringer and typically do stringing for themselves and for a couple of the guys that don't to earn a couple of bucks on the side. Nobody charges a lot because it just something we do on the side for people we know. The shops have no way to compete with hobbyists labor costs. If anyone is a serious rec player they need to get a stringer, the thing pays for itself, you can be at home and string rackets while you watch tv. I got a decent upright crank machine for $150 on craigslist a few years ago and it has already saved me a bundle plus a can test out new strings/tensions all the time if I want.
     
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  13. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    tennis balls also still cost roughly the same as they did in the mid 80's.

    i string for $15 plus material costs.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2013
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  14. Clintspin

    Clintspin Semi-Pro

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    It is too low but tennis players are a thrifty bunch. Players wait way to long to string just because it costs them $ 25 to string. It's not a great way to make a living but for clubs it's more money on the side to pay the bills. Tennis clubs are usually paying a teenager to string for $ 5 to $ 10 a racquet and the teenager loves the money. The club makes a few thousand extra to pay the bills every month and the kid makes as much as $ 10 an hour (more fun than cleaning the courts).

    Around the DC area I see Craigslist of guys stringing for $ 10 with nice machines and I think they offer pickup and drop-off. I just can't see how that can be worth it. They are selling themselves short and forcing the price to stay very low for the rest of the stringers.
     
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  15. rdis10093

    rdis10093 Hall of Fame

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    they are the ones with the power. you have to have strings to play.
     
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  16. Dags

    Dags Professional

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    I'm one of those home stringers. I would agree that I wouldn't like to try to make a living out of it.

    If I tried to do so, I think the area where I'd be looking to stand out from the crowd would be with matching racquets and customisation. People are becoming increasingly aware of this area, and more likely to go to a qualified professional as it's not something you do that often.
     
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  17. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Do any of you believe that the increasing number of home stringers has decreased the demand for stringing services and therefore kept the price of those services down?

    Nevermind, I now see OHBH had already brought up the idea.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2013
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  18. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    What got me into stringing was when I paid $18 for Leonia 66 - my first string job. looked in the back of tennis magazine and Leonia 66 was $1.88. That string is now $2.59. That is a 38% increase. So ask yourself this question, "would you pay $25 for a 15L gage nylon string job today, or would you buy a stringer and string your own.

    If the price is too high people will find alternatives and you will be out of a job.
     
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  19. SuperHead

    SuperHead Guest

    In my opinion, the fee should stay the same as it already is or else not many people would like to restring or would just go to a cheaper stringer. But then again, it's simply my opinion.
     
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  20. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    Average professional labor costs in the NYC area is $30-$40 per stick. As it should be.
     
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  21. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    There is no comparison between some recreational tennis player who never real tennis stringing in his basement with his internet connection and a professional stringer who strings for real athletes. Those stringers deserve the $40 per stick, and you can certainly feel the difference between a hack layman and a professional.
     
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  22. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    I don't think there is much difference between a "professional" string job and non-professional, at least I haven't noticed any difference. Professionals are simply faster, which is what you need at tournaments. I recently bought a cheap drop weight stringing machine, and I'm very satisfied with the way I string my own rackets, with no previous experience. It's not rocket science, if you do it with care, it's going to be good.

    Around here, in Bay Area, you can get your racket strung for $10-12+String cost, and I've never had a problem. Plus, at that price, if you get bad service, no big deal, find someone else.
     
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  23. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    Can't agree with you at all. Not only can I feel the difference between a recreational player who strings, up to a pro shop stringer who may or may not play at a high level, I can feel the difference between professional stringers, and out of them all, very few can string well.
     
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  24. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Have you ever strung a racquet?
     
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  25. tennis ratchet

    tennis ratchet New User

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    i agree that stringing is too cheap.. cl charges here in southern new england are anywhere from $10 - 25 per racquet... i string myself, and even thought about doin some on the side to pick up a little scratch, but it takes me about an hour still per racquet--not worth it at $10.
     
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  26. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    I think you're interpreting "difference in feel" as "difference in quality". Stringers use different stringing machines, and sometimes the same tension setting can give different results on let's say constant pull and lockout machines. Also, the non-pro stringers who you're had experience with may not have cared much about doing quality job. Basically, if you knew much about stringing, you would know that's given the same machine, there isn't a difference between a pro and non-pro, expect for speed, assuming they both care about doing a good job. Even then, if you know what you're doing, you can compensate for differences between machines, so expensive machines don't provide any advantage, except for speed.
     
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  27. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

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    If the "non-professional" takes some pride in his work I'm sure he can string just as well as a "professional", but I'm sure there are also some hacks out there that don't care enough to do a good job, make sure they lose as little tension on tie offs as possible etc.

    I call BS on this one, unless you are a touring pro/high level college player.


    Stringing a racket isn't rocket science, and with some attention to detail and a desire to do a good job almost anyone can produce a good string job.

    Now producing that same quality time after time in under 20 minutes per string job ... that's what makes a PRO.
     
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  28. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    To answer the OP's question, yes, stringing racquets labor is a bargain compared to other labor items.
    When I started stringing 45 years ago, my labor fee was $10.00/ racquet at that time.It is different today.
    Most strings back then were either your typical nylon like Ashaways Vantage, or Wilson's tournament nylon, etc., which when bought in reels the price per racquet string cost about $1.00 / racquet, and a quality nat. gut like Victor Imperial, or Bow Brand Gut was $10.00/ set.As you can see the price of string increased a decent % over the years, which seems okay with players as they do purchase strings still, but labor is still a bargain, heck, some posters here charge less than what I did all those years ago, and gas was 28 cents/ gal. back then. So given inflation over the last 45 years, stringing labor is a deal.
     
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  29. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    I was both, thirty years ago.
     
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  30. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    I strung my first stick in '71, by hand, with a dowel, and the guy who apprenticed me strung for many big name players whenever they were in NY. Seranos were the machine of the day, and I pumped-out many a frame back then. I've strung way too many sticks since then, and I now only string for my players if absolutely necessary when the tournament stringer sucks. Otherwise, they pay the $35-$40 per frame from one of the best stringers when at home. I pay him to string mine as well, so that my time is better spent coaching.
     
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  31. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    I have strung too many racquets in my lifetime to do other peoples for money. Instead I tell them to buy a stringer and I will teach them how to do there own. If I die and go to hell there will be a never ending pile of racquets to be strung. Stringing racquets is neat for your first 500 or so....after a couple thousand its Eh. After that it starts getting to you.

    Anyone serious in this game needs to string there own frames. I break freshly strung syn gut 15-16g in 45 minutes of playing. Practice 4-6 hours and do the math. Even a cheap drop weight ala klippermate is an effective stringer if you use it properly. After a while its just plain ignorant not to string your own frames. If your serious about the sport that is.

    Same goes for Ball machines and home gym equipment.
     
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  32. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    There is a difference in how much tension loss there is as the string turns around the grommet. There a huge difference in many string jobs regarding cross string tension loss due to friction. There a difference as to whether or not the stringer takes the professional time to pre-stretch or not. There is also a difference in post stringing tension loss, and it gets worse the faster a stick is strung, because the string's creep has not been removed when strung very fast. That is why players who can afford it, especially with poly, will cut the string out even if it hasn't been used, as they prefer a fresh strung frame for a match.

    There is obviously a difference in machines, most importantly, mount torque, clamp slippage, and string tension calibration. There is also a huge string bed response difference between one piece or two piece, standard pattern installation, 50/50 method, Around the World method, and box method, depending upon the racquet.

    There is most definitely stringing technique variations, such as speed of pulling crosses through mains and whether or not the mains are stressed, cut, frayed, or worn; making sure that the clamp is released first, before the clamp is opened, so that the clamp and its mount moves if the string does, as opposed to the string moving inside the clamp as it is opened, stressing the surface of the string, especially gut or a gummy multi like Tecnifibre; as previously mentioned, making sure that the string is tensioned long enough before clamping to overcome creep; insuring that there no tension loss on tie-off strings, especially on mains where it not only affects the string bed, but the head shape; the necessity for the crosses to be installed straightly before and while being clamped, or are they being straightened after the job is done, representing a substantial loss of cross string tension, not to mention uneven tension depending on the length of the cross and the degree of curvature; the availability of the advanced technique of using cross string separators so that there is zero friction as the crosses are tensioned through the mains and the requisite time to do so, and many other factors.

    To string a racquet at the highest quality, it takes 30-40 minutes, IMPO, and few stringers are willing to do that. I hate stringing, and I will absolutely put it off and procrastinate as long as I can. But I usually take 45-60 minutes to string a frame, without taking a break, when I do string, and my players appreciate the time and care.
     
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  33. SwankPeRFection

    SwankPeRFection Hall of Fame

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    I guess it depends on the quality of work that you do. I charged a friend $20 for regripping, restring (he had his own string), new grommet install (he had grommets). I even cleaned the frame after removing the old grommets because he had clay dust and muck all over it. Frame was throughly cleaned and the grommet holes were cleaned as well with pipe cleaners to be sure everything was pristine. When I gave it back to him, it looked practically brand new. He was happy and I got an extra tip out of it.

    I of course believe people should get that kind of service whenever asking anyone (even shops) to do the same work. Unfortunately, these shops don't do that. If they don't treat frames this same way, I don't believe I should pay more for their service due to inflation, just like I don't like to be expected to tip someone just because it's expected. :rolleyes:
     
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  34. Tamiya

    Tamiya Semi-Pro

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    yeah I'm a Classic Racquet Restorer not a proshop monkey cranking its organ :)

    Must be a mind numbing job tbh, dealing with all those schoolie parents
    who "dunno how the kid plays, at school PE" & just want cheapest fastest
    restring on a bashed up frame that looks like its been used for hockey.
     
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  35. Andyroo10567

    Andyroo10567 Professional

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    I charge $5 to friends. Includes synthetic gut. $1.50 for an overgrip. I don't have too much synthetic gut anymore so the offer was just limited to those who heard about it.
     
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  36. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Interesting thread going on here.....

    I'm a serious player, & have yet to purchase a machine. When I sell my racquets on here (if I ever do), I'm going to post a Wanted Ad for one and buy a reel on TW.
     
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  37. eastbayliz

    eastbayliz Rookie

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    What side of the bay you on? :) Awhile ago I paid $30 for labor alone at a tennis shop in Berkeley. Then my coworker gave me the number of a guy who strings. Paid him $30 to string two racquets with string I provided. It did not take long for me to decide that the smart thing to do was buy a stringer and do it myself. Gamma Two Progression is on its way!

    AS to OP- I would assume that people stringing on the side, for themselves and friends, is keeping the cost down. Well-except for clubs/shops.

    I look forward to stringing for myself and for the nonprofit youth tennis program I work for.
     
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  38. Tamiya

    Tamiya Semi-Pro

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    you guys in the 'States got it good :(

    here in oz its more like A$20/25/30ea for proshop labour alone,
    $70ish allup if you want some fancy Babolat or Lux hybrid
    and $100-120+ for Pacific or clubgrade NG.

    which is all a bit wierd considering we can buy RogFed's portrait
    nicely framed in a 27" tall stand for $49.95 brandnew at K-Mart
    (i haven't tried meself but i'm told if you peel off the picture, you'll find
    some racquet-shaped tool underneath - ok ye 10S snobs might sneer,
    but i'd bet it'll still hit a ball better than nothing)
     
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  39. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    North-east :)
     
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  40. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    You forgot to mention temperature, humidity, altitude, time of year, time of day, stringer's psychological and physical profile, and many other "important" factors. Really, if you're so paranoid, you can just buy a string tension meter for $29 and validate the job. I know it doesn't give exact reading and blah, blah, but it's good enough for relative measurements once you've measured a reference string job. OR, you can just string your rackets yourself. Even when it comes to professional stringing, you'll see some variation in the results, unless you stick with the same strings/stringer.

    Just stick with constant pull or lockout machines, whichever works for you, forget about pre-stretch and relax, you don't have to compensate your tension values for sun spots or gravitational shifts.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2013
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  41. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    My 2 cents...

    Back in the olden days of wood racquets, you just didn't break strings. On the flip side, it was/is harder to string a wood racquet. So, you got $10 for fewer racquets, but that $10 was worth more than today.

    Today, stringing a modern frame is far easier than stringing an 18X22 67 sq in head. You also string a lot more as synthetics now are the dominant string type (yes, poly included) and wear out before gut. So, you string more for $10, but $10 ain't worth what is used to be.

    I know that many shops are starting to charge more for polyester and I agree, a couple of bucks extra is a small price to pay for poly stringing.
     
    #41
  42. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

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    I can string tennis rackets all day for $10 a pop, but I would hate to do badminton rackets for $10. There is badminton club near by that will badminton rackets for $8, so why try to to compete with that? Good thing they only do badminton rackets and they use a Yonex ES5PRO. I only do badminton rackets only as a favor for a couple of loyal clients.
     
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  43. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    Stringing most modern racquets is easier than a wood (as per Rabbit) and far easier than a T-2000. The only "modern' racquet that I have found to be a complete pain are the old Prince Vortex racquets. Incidentally, if going by inflation alone : $10 in 1980 would be $27.43 in 2012. ProShops make up the difference by overcharging for string.

    In my area of the south an NXT string job costs about $45. In fact, most overcharge about $10 a set. On TW it is $17/set. Local big box sporting goods store charges $19.99 / set.

    -SF
     
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  44. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    Temp and humidity is actually extremely important, as some stringers will sometimes string outdoors and indoors at the same event. My players can feel the difference, and that affects win/loss record, rankings, money, and scholarships. That is real, not paranoia.

    There is no reason to start being offensive nor a rank-out contest, unless you really want to go there....
     
    #44
  45. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    I don't blame you!

    I had to string a Vortex the other day! With VS 16 no less. i hated that damn thing and all like it. No matter how you start the crosses off, you feel like you're doing something wrong. I went with a hard weave on the 1st cross and it turned out...

    I have 3 T2000s and every once in a while will restring one with syngut just for fun.
     
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  46. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    You should always start your crosses on a Vortex with a hard weave. If you go over the first main instead of under it is easier. Good thing about vortexes is there is never a blocked hole.
     
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  47. jmnk

    jmnk Professional

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    That's very interesting. Would you happen to have any data/statistics backing those claims? (I mean beside someone just saying 'I can feel the difference'). Like a blind test for example.
     
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  48. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    My players just do what i say.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
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  49. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I would agree with RiggensAuroraHO to a point. If you take two similar rackets and test the strings after stringing you may be able to detect a difference and if you do there is inconsistency. If you have two identical rackets strung and matched by the same stringer they should have the same SBS, total weight, balance, and swingweight every time they are strung.

    EDIT: If a professional player plays with rackets with a swingweight of 360 kgcm^2 and 6 rackets come back to him from 355 to 365 I think they would be able to tell something is wrong.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
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  50. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    You should tell them to go win the US Open and take you along to string. LMAO
     
    #50

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