Are tennis sneakers any different than jogging sneakers?

Discussion in 'Shoes and Apparel' started by TimeToPlaySets, Sep 1, 2012.

  1. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    You do understand that the cushioning in sneakers wear out much, much sooner before the soles wear out, right? That's why frequent runners will get new running shoes every few months even though the soles still look almost brand new, because once the cushioning in them are gone, the shoes are worthless to them as they'll cause them injury. Same with tennis shoes. Cushioning is very important to tennis shoes as they prevent knee, foot, and back injuries. And just like running shoes, the cushioning in tennis shoes will wear out far before the soles will. You won't be able to visually see the wear in the cushioning as you can in the soles but you will certainly FEEL it and your feet, knees and back will likely start hurting.
     
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  2. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Rookie

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    If you look closely, there are $10 gel inserts inside the shoe. Way better than thicker than whatever original padding there was. The only pain I feel from playing 5 sets of tennis is in my elbow. Joggers who buy new sneakers every week are suckers who believe whatever the shoe sellers tell them.
     
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  3. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I'm not a believer in this argument. If the shoes remain stable, and provide the foot with a stable base, I think the compression of the cushioning isn't very important.

    The evidence on cushioning and injury prevention is very unclear at the moment. A number of barefoot advocates have produced studies showing that cushioning seems to increase joint torque, especially at the knees. Even this hasn't been shown to increase injuries, but at the same time, the evidence for cushioned shoes preventing injuries doesn't exist either.

    I know people who have reduced back and knee pain be eschewing shoes and running barefoot. Tennis is different, but I've found that fit and stability are what I find key, and cushioning doesn't rate of much importance.
     
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  4. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Rookie

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    Wait a second, how can a tennis shoe even help to prevent an ankle roll in the first place? I can only see this if you're wearing high tops that serve as a brace both above and below the ankle joint. Almost like a split, this would truly prevent ankle roll.

    However, in a tennis sneaker, the ankle is exposed, like in any other sneaker. It shouldn't matter how stiff the sneaker is. It's totally moot.

    In theory, if you wore steel sneakers with the ankles exposed, how would that help prevent rolling the ankle? If you stop short laterally, the entire steel shoe can just roll right over at the exposed ankle hinge.

    Now that I've given it more than 30 seconds of thought, I think I was suckered into yet another marketing scam. "Tennis sneakers prevent ankle roll". BS. It makes no sense.

    My old Prince sneakers were beat up, so it's not a total loss, but I'm just saying. At least the new Barricade 6.0's will have fresh padding. But, I can't see how they can prevent ankle rolls.
     
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  5. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    That is so wrong I don't know where to start. Don't you think serious runners know more about their equipment than the salespeople in the store? Heck, I know more about tennis racquets than any salesperson in any pro shop I've ever been in.

    Cushioning is molded into the shoe and compresses every time you put weight on them. They cannot last very long. The insoles do not provide the primary cushioning of the shoe. Even with new insoles, I can feel that the cushioning built into the EVA of the shoe is gone.
     
    #55
  6. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    I have many different models of tennis shoes. When I wear the ones with more cushioning, I feel fine afterwards. When I wear the ones with less cushioning, my knees and feet will ache afterwards. Happens every time. I don't wear the ones with less cushioning very often because of this.
     
    #56
  7. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Because tennis shoes are more stable and don't roll over on themselves. Running shoes don't have any lateral support and have more flimsy uppers so if you're running sideways and stop abruptly, the shoe can roll over on itself and take your ankle along with it. That's much less likely to happen with a tennis shoe that has good lateral support. Lateral stability is critical for playing tennis.

    Try wearing a real tennis shoe and play hard and you'll see.
     
    #57
  8. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Rookie

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    What do you mean by a sneaker "rolling over on iteself" ?
     
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  9. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Do you play aggressive tennis where you have to run sideways at full speed and then suddenly stop so you can change direction and run back the other way?

    If your shoes do not have adequate lateral stability and support and the uppers are soft, the shoe will literally roll over sideways so that the outer side of the shoe ends up touching the ground which makes you fall over and roll your ankle sideways.
     
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  10. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Rookie

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    Ok, so it's like the foot is sliding off the deck of the shoe's sole ?
     
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  11. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Sort of. It's more like if you took your shoe and put it on its outer side rather than on its sole. When you try and stop abruptly and change direction, your momentum will cause the shoe on your outside leg to roll over on it side as the sole grips the court and stops but your body momentum keeps going sideways. And since your foot is still inside of the shoe, your ankle will roll over with the shoe.
     
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  12. 14OuncesStrung

    14OuncesStrung Rookie

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    It's clear you cannot read. I don't care anymore...
    Yes many of us on this forum have played tennis for countless years, so we don't know anything, right?
    Do what you want.
     
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  13. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Rookie

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    But how does a stiff walled shoe prevent rollover better than a soft walled shoe?
    The only way I can think is the foot sliding off the platform, and sliding up the flexible wall (which would result in the side of the shoe touching the ground)

    Otherwise, a soft of hard sneaker would roll over all the same.
     
    #63
  14. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Nope, a stiff walled shoe with more lateral stability built into the shoe and a wider footprint with a stiffer sole, like tennis shoes have will keep your foot from rolling over much better than a soft sided flexible running shoe will. Of course, it can still happen if you're playing very aggressively, as it still happens to the pros wearing tennis shoes, but much less likely than if you're wearing a running shoe.
     
    #64
  15. SempreSami

    SempreSami Hall of Fame

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    As a runner, I take offence at this remark.

    Cushioning is finite.
     
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  16. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Rookie

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    Actually, that totally contradicts the TW review.

    The arches were supportive on my feet while the width was comfortably snug, keeping any side to side sliding inside the shoe to a minimum.

    The quote above implies the footprint is narrow, which prevents the foot from sliding laterally inside the shoe. If the shoe had a wide footprint, your feet would slide around more. Funny, how there is such misinformation out there when you really start asking questions.
     
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  17. NJ1

    NJ1 Professional

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    The footprint refers to the sole not the inside of the shoe so has nothing to do with what you're yapping about.
     
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  18. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Huh? The shoe is snug inside to keep your feet locked in place and not slide around inside the shoe, which would cause you to lose your balance when your stop suddenly and would also cause foot injuries like toe jamming. The wider footprint is on the OUTSIDE of the shoe. The soles are wider to help them not roll over as easily. The inside of a shoe doesn't leave a footprint, the soles of the shoe does.
     
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  19. martini1

    martini1 Hall of Fame

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    Tennis shoes - non-marking

    Not all running shoes are non-marking. So people are ruining the courts.

    The closest thing to tennis shoes are flat outsole shoes such as basketball shoes or even chucks.
     
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  20. Vlad_C

    Vlad_C Semi-Pro

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    Take a look at Head shoes. They offer very good quality for the price, and you can sometimes find them on sale.
    I've been using these:
    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Head_Speed_Pro/descpageMSHEAD-HMSPWB.html

    and I am considering buying these as well, they have the same outsole and are a really good deal at this price:
    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Head_Radical_Pro_II_Black_Silver/descpageMSHEAD-HMRP2BS.html

    Trust me, after trying some real tennis shoes like the above, you will no longer question the benefits of playing in real tennis shoes vs running sneakers. And you don't have to spend hundreds either on the latest over-hyped Adidas or Nike.
     
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  21. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Rookie

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    Thanks Vlad, I ended up buying a pair of Barricade 6.0's for about $70. Since they are new, they have more padding than my 7 year old squash sneakers, but I will report back if I feel any further "tennis sneaker" benefits.
     
    #71
  22. Tyler91

    Tyler91 Rookie

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    The black/silver Radical Pro II looks awesome, IMO. Especially considering the price. If you get them, I'd be interested in your thoughts about them. My only fear would be that maybe they have a cheap feel to them...I usually don't favor shoes that are at all plasticky (is that a word?) in the upper.
     
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  23. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    so, any thoughts to report, OP?
     
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  24. TimeToPlaySets

    TimeToPlaySets Rookie

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    I am pleased. I needed new sneakers anyway, and these barricade 6.0's were $70+ on Zbay, new overstock. They took a few wears to break in (arches would burn at first) I don't know if they really prevent ankle roll any better than slippers, but I like having new sneakers with lots of padding anyways....(protect knees) and for the same price as any old sneaker. Good risk/reward.
     
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  25. 5point5

    5point5 Semi-Pro

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  26. just_visiting

    just_visiting New User

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    I wear tennis shoes for tennis, golf cleats for golf, runners for running, cross trainers for gym workout, slippers for swimming pool area. I have no problems wearing tennis shoes, running shoes, and or cross trainers for going out in Jeans. Dress shoes for wearing slacks.
     
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  27. tennytive

    tennytive Semi-Pro

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    Last year I bought some Nike Air Court Leader Lows for basketball. Also used them for tennis on hard courts but the soles wore out pretty quickly as they are designed for wood.

    This year I switched to Nike City Court 5's and noticed the difference right away. Much more stable and the soles are tougher and didn't really start showing much wear until after 3 months or so. Now they'll become everyday shoes until next spring when I break out the new pair.

    BTW I was able to get each of these pairs for under $40.
     
    #77
  28. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Playing tennis in jogging shoes is a sprained ankle waiting to happen. Glad you got some real tennis shoes.
     
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  29. stapletonj

    stapletonj Semi-Pro

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    ditto on the sprained ankles waiting to happen.
     
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  30. Sinner

    Sinner Professional

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    Indeed.

    I've seen novice-tennis-group-lesson players wear everything... running shoes, Keds, old-beat-up Chucks, etc... makes me cringe everytime I see them scramble around the court.

    No guarantees that proper tennis shoes will 100% prevent ankle-rolls, but no doubt, it will lessen that possibility.
     
    #80
  31. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Saw two swimmers play in Speedos, wrestlers in singlets, all barefootin' Date nite
     
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  32. Big_Dangerous

    Big_Dangerous Legend

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    Yeah I've seen it all and to admit I used to play in running shoes quite a bit myself. For whatever reason I made myself believe that I moved worse playing in actual tennis shoes as opposed to running shoes but after playing with the right shoes for a while it's not so much of a problem anymore. Every now and then when I'm wearing my black tennis shoes I'll still get that feeling, but I think it's really more of a self-fulfilling prophecy at this point. Where it's like if I think I'm moving worse because of the shoe then I believe even if it's not true, but I just have move away from that thinking.

    The biggest problem I really have with playing in tennis shoes as opposed to running shoes is that because I wear a wide width shoe (2E-4E) there are like a million different running shoes in all sorts of colors that I can, and so much less choices for actual tennis shoes. I ****ing hate that so much that Nike and Adidas just refuse to make actual tennis shoes in wider widths. The best you can really do is customize a pair of Nikes, but then it takes like weeks for them to make it and it's 150 bucks... Why can't I get a freaking pair of vapors in wide widths? Damn you Nike!
     
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  33. lstewart

    lstewart Rookie

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    Wow, what alot of technical info being shared. What's funny is the guy's squash shoes are pretty much just a court shoe with most of the same atributes as a tennis court shoe, other than probably having a softer sole that would wear our faster on most tennis surfaces. His shoe of the last 7 years is very similar to a tennis or basketball shoe, and nothing like a running shoe.
     
    #83
  34. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    The OP said jogging shoes and his second post said he might want jogging shoes because of the greater padding.
     
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  35. netguy

    netguy Semi-Pro

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    I wear my GR4 for playing tennis and running. :)
     
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