Are there any other Eagnas dealers?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by waltj2k, Mar 16, 2005.

  1. waltj2k

    waltj2k Guest

    I have read the horror storys of dealing with Maxline.

    Are there any other Eagnas dealers out there?

    I seem to recall reading in a thread that someone bought an Eagnas machine from another dealer.

    Walt
     
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  2. barry

    barry Hall of Fame

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    Eagnas does not build machines, just buys them from all the manufacturers with their logo on them. An earlier posted stated, there are only 4 stringer producers in the world, so manufacturers order them with your specs and logo’s. They are all pretty much the same machine only important items are clamps, tension, and a mounting system.
    Stingers are not rocket science, but basic pull tension and hold it. They seldom wear out, but often need calibration. Clamps wear, and need sanding or replacing over time, but the machines I use are heavy metal and seldom break. 1 spring in 5 years.
    At the retail level, there have complaints posted about all the vendors which could be real or imaginary. Even post about TW, I have never had a problem with them.
     
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  3. Audiodude

    Audiodude Rookie

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    There may indeed be only four manufacturers of stringing machines, but the build quality of Eagnas machines is so much poorer than that of the major brands that it cannot be overlooked. To say that stringing machines are simply clamps, tension, and a mounting system is at best a specious argument and ignores the obvious. A stringing machine is a tool. Like most tools, it performs better and longer when made of higher quality components. Better build quality usually means better reliability and less reliance on after sale support. I've found that most of the time with tools you truly do get what you pay for. Or as my brother in law, who owns a car repair shop says, " I can't afford to buy cheap tools". The Eagnas machines remind me of the $29.00 18 volt cordless drills I see advertised at Pep Boys. Sure they have an 18 volt battery and they will spin a bit in a chuck like every other 18 volt drill available, and for all I know they may be manufactured in the same factory as some of the better known brand names. But, it doesn't strike me as a tool I'd want to rely on.
     
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  4. barry

    barry Hall of Fame

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    Audiodude

    Do you own a Eagnas machine? I have one and it works well. One problem in 5 years, a spring broke! Ordered and received part in 1 week, which to me is good customer service.

    Tennis stringers are simple devices; there is not much to break on them. You can pay a higher price, but you get the same machine with a different name on it.

    Let’s face it; you have a mounting system for the racket, clamps that hold the string, and a tension system to pull the weight. What else is there? My machine weighs about 85 pounds, is solid steel, and has the best clamps made.
    Do not know what you have or use, but the person stringing the racket is more important than the string machine you use, assuming it is calibrated correctly.
    What amazes me is the difference in tension from different stringers. Most don't calibrate often, and you can get a 4 pound variation. I use a drop weight because gravity never lies.
    Other than the broken spring, no problems in 5 years, which says it must be a decent machine.
     
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  5. Audiodude

    Audiodude Rookie

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    I briefly owned a Hawk 80. I sent it back after a week even though it cost me a little over a hundred dollars in shipping and restocking fees. The build quality was absolutely horrible. The mounting system would've made Rube Goldberg blush. The clamp surfaces were not parallel and required what I consider to be too much force to hold the string. The paintjob was no better than I can do with a can of spray paint. Other than that, it was a nice machine. For all I know the Eagnas machine may have ultimately been able to do the job, but it would never have been able to do the job well.

    I do agree with you that a stringing machine needs to do three things; hold the racquet securely, tension the strings accurately and consistently, and clamp the strings securely without damage. I, however, believe that it can be done with varying amounts of success. The type of argument you're making can be made for most things, but frankly I have no desire to drive a Chevy Sprint or experience the enjoyment of considering whether I'd like to supersize my meal.
     
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  6. barry

    barry Hall of Fame

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    Then buy a name product for 3 times the cost and enjoy it. Some of us string many rackets and are familiar with what is on the market, and all we want is a consistent reliable machine don't care about its name.

    My stringing machine works great and has been reliable, cannot ask more than that for under $500.
     
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  7. waltj2k

    waltj2k Guest

    I guess this is where I stand. For me a stringing machine is a "Nice to have". I probably won't string more than 4-5 per year and will just string my own personal racquets. So the machine will "pay for itself" years down the road. But to shorten that time I'd like to keep cost down.

    I am thinking of a machine in the sub $250 range. A machine like the Eagnas Den-3600 has the feature set that would foot the bill. Especially at $159.

    Audiodude made mention of the build quality being suspect. Metal that is thinner than another companies and a poorer paint won't matter to me. It's racquet stringer for personal use occasionally not a living room show piece.

    Now if the build quality effects the ability to string racquets properly then that is another issue. Then it's worth spending more money on a more expensive machine.
     
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  8. Audiodude

    Audiodude Rookie

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    I want to quickly clarify my position and then I'll leave this alone. I personally get more enjoyment working with equipment that is designed and built well. This would be true for cars, tools, electronics, etc. I also believe that mechanical devices that are machined to tighter tolerances will in the long run tend to be more accurate and reliable. I also believe that you can reach a point of diminishing returns rather quickly with such things. I don't buy any of the above to use as a showpiece but because I perceive true value for money based on my personal needs. If I were going to purchase a stringing machine to string only 5 to 10 racquets a year and I had budgeted $250.00 to do so I'd probably take my chances and buy an Eagnas Flex 740. 6 point mounting and fixed clamps for a little over $200.00? Looks like a good deal to me. Too good to be true? That probably varies from one machine to the next.
     
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  9. Ben42

    Ben42 Semi-Pro

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    But do you really want to take a chance that your machine will not work?

    I also thought I’d take a chance on a Flex-740 a couple of years ago. I could have lived with the rude e-mails from Victor and the ill fitting shoulder supports that I had to sand down to fit.

    But my machine’s tensioning arm didn’t rotate freely and I couldn’t fix it. That meant it wouldn’t pull correct or consistent tension and that was unacceptable. But Maxline/Victor didn’t think it was a problem. After numerous rude e-mails from him, his finally decided that “lowering the arm very slowly” was an appropriate solution. So much for the 5-year warranty.

    I did get an RMA from him, but had to contest the charges with my credit card company to actually get my money back. I did not get my shipping back. So it cost me almost $100 for nothing. I even had to buy another box to ship it back because UPS wouldn’t accept the one the stringer originally came in since it was so worn.

    So Barry was a lucky one who got a decent machine for a good price. I was not lucky and it cost me $100 for a lesson well learned and not much else. I’ve posted my story here before and I’ll keep on posting it. And when I see someone say the Eagnas looks like a good deal I’ll post it again. Then people can take their chances and can’t say they haven’t been warned.
     
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  10. Audiodude

    Audiodude Rookie

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    Agreed. Been there, done that.
     
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  11. waltj2k

    waltj2k Guest

    Seems like dealing with Maxline/Eagnas is too much of a crap shoot.

    From Barry's good experience to Ben and Audiodude's bad one's. There's too much variance.

    I just want to plop down my dollars, get a good product and go on about my business. I don't want to have to call, email, fax or contact my credit card company.

    I was just thinking if there was a dealer that sold Eagnas machines that might offer better customer service than Maxline.
     
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  12. Audiodude

    Audiodude Rookie

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    Most reputable dealers don't want to sell something where there are known quality control issues. They end up taking all the heat for problems they didn't create.
     
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  13. waltj2k

    waltj2k Guest

    I just took a look at the reviews of the Flex 740 on Stringforum.net. There are 4 reviews and all 4 had some form of negative comments about either the stringer itself or the customer service.

    Many of these review are few years old. So this isn't a new problem.
     
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  14. Radical Shot

    Radical Shot Semi-Pro

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    Doesn't the Flex 740 contains an out-dated parallel grip device?
     
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  15. vinouspleasure

    vinouspleasure Rookie

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    #15

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