Are You Taking the Wrong Vitamin E?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by rk_sports, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. rk_sports

    rk_sports Hall of Fame

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    According to this article

    link: Are You Taking the Wrong Vitamin E? Get the Facts on Vitamin E Tocopherols

    • An excellent vitamin E supplement must have the correct mix of tocopherols and tocotrienols, not just any mix. A mix of three ingredients in an 80-10-10 ratio is not the same as say a ratio of 20-40-40, for instance.
    • Too much alpha tocopherol impairs benefits of gamma tocopherol

    Just wanted to get some opinions from our own TW experts :)

    Do you believe this analysis?
    If you do, are there any products with this correct mix?
     
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  2. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    I try to get most of my vitamin E from foods -- wheat germ, avocados, sunflower seeds, peanuts, almonds, walnuts and other nuts, saffola (high-oleic safflower oil), spinach and other foods. Altho' I rarely use it, sunflower oil supposedly has even higher levels of vit E than safflower oil. I assume the these sources of foods have a decent mixture of tocopherols and tocotrienols.

    When I do buy a vit E supplement, I usually look for a lower level supplement (100 or 200 IU) that contains mixed tocopherols. If I buy the more common 400 IU supplement, I take it no more than 2-3x/week. I must admit that I have never really looked at the specific mix of tocopherols (& tocotrienols). With adequate food sources, I am assuming that I'm getting a good balance there (but I don't really know this for certain).
     
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  3. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    ^^ several fairly well controlled studies in the past decade or so looked at E and concluded that 400 IU caused a DECREASE in survival over several years in both a heart disease and a cancer population. One of the studies suggested that 200 IU seemed to be a safe, though not clearly useful, dose.
     
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  4. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    "I love the smell of Tocopherol in the morning"
     
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  5. WildVolley

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    I mostly have used vitamin E externally to deal with cuts and burns. In my experience, it does reduce scarring.
     
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  6. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    ... it smells like... Victory!!
     
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  7. vin

    vin Professional

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    Unless one has a specific need for increased vitamin E intake, I'm with SystemicAnomaly in regard to relying on a good diet.

    While some of other tocopherols and tocotrienols do have certain effects, alpha-tocopherol is the primary form of vitamin E that has biological activity.

    The research that ollinger pointed out is a pretty good example of the unimpressive results that have been observed in general from supplementing with individual antioxidants.
     
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  8. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    I have seen a number of caveats regarding a daily intake of 400 IU or higher.

    With these studies as well as studies with lower intake levels, what form of vitamin E is commonly used? Is it a synthetic (dl-) form or a natural form? If the latter, does it include gamma tocopherol or mixed tocopherols? Or is it primarily d-alpha tocopherol, d-alpha tocopheryl acetate, or d-alpha tocopheryl succinate?

    Is it not possible that these different variations could yield very different results as suggested by the OP's article? Inquiring minds want to know.
     
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  9. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Came across a bit more info on gamma tocopherol. Altho' blood levels of gamma are much lower than alpha, it is interesting to note that foods often contain a significant amount of gamma -- with many foods, gamma is present in greater quantities than alpha.

    http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/ss03/vitamine.html
    http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminE


    Following are comparisons of aplha to gamma in some food sources:

    http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminE/#food_source

    Quite often, I'll use Smart Balance oil (for uses other than cooking). It contain a blend of soy, olive and canola oils. From the info provided in the link above, I suspect that it contains generous levels of gamma tocopherol.
     
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  10. Talker

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    It makes a big difference what kind of vitamin E taken.
    Gamma E is very important.

    Alpha tocopherol form of vitamin E displaces critically important gamma tocopherol.
     
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  11. Talker

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    Type of vitamin E is important. Always look for rebuttals on these studies and use what you know and make your own conclusion.
    The studies were good but all they told us was that all vitamin E is not the same.

    Check out this article for example.

    http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2012...ease_01.htm?source=search&key=vitamin gamma e
     
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  12. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    ^ Much thanks for that added info on gamma E? I've seen quite a few articles that reference studies without indicating what from of vitamin E was used.

    Ditto for articles that cite studies of other nutrients. They often do not indicate if a full spectrum supplement was used or something else like a synthetic form lacking in co-factors. Vitamin C without bioflavanoids comes to mind. Or is it wise to supplement with beta-carotene without the other carotenes/carotenoids?

    .
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2012
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  13. charliefedererer

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    What some of the US top doctors think at the National Institute of Health:

    "The best way to get the daily requirement of vitamin E is by eating food sources. Vitamin E is found in the following foods:

    Vegetable oils (such as wheat germ, sunflower, safflower, corn, and soybean oils)
    Nuts (such as almonds, peanuts, and hazelnuts/filberts)
    Seeds (such as sunflower seeds)
    Green leafy vegetables (such as spinach and broccoli)
    Fortified breakfast cereals, fruit juices, margarine, and spreads. Fortified means that vitamins have been added to the food. Check the Nutrition Fact Panel on the food label.
    Products made from these foods, such as margarine, also contain vitamin E."
    - http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002406.htm


    From the Mayo Clinic and the American Heart Association:
    "Antioxidant

    Vitamin E possesses antioxidant activity, but the clinical effects of antioxidant protection by vitamin E are not clear in humans. The American Heart Association has recommended obtaining antioxidants such as vitamin E by eating a well-balanced diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, rather than from supplements, until further scientific evidence is available."
    - http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/vitamin-e/NS_patient-vitamine/DSECTION=evidence


    That last reference from the Mayo Clinic individually considers 55 different condiditions for which Vitamin E is of potential benefit. Essentially all the reviews end with " The scientific evidence for vitamin E is inconclusive in this area, and further research is warranted."
     
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  14. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    ^ the government recommended daily intake of E is something like 35 I.U., based on very scant data. The doses that are generally of interest in research studies are on the order of 200-400 I.U. or higher, and are unlikely to be obtained from dietary sources.
     
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