Arm friendly-er? volkl and donnay

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by TroutSc, Nov 28, 2012.

  1. TroutSc

    TroutSc Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    Messages:
    470
    I have a few PB7s and have a demo F100. I am trying to discern if there is a difference in "arm friendliness". I cannot really tell yet. My elbow is often sore, I have a bab apdgt and a bb london as well. Im currently not using these as I have been sticking with the pb7. I assumed the bab originally caused the elbow issue so I put it away. The london is soft but I never really connected to it. So currently I am checking out the donnay. So between the donnay and the volkl, would there be any noticeable difference in the area of elbow comfort? I am hoping to commit to 1 racquet and sticking with it. i think im going mental though trying to figure out which one. I seem to hit about the same with both.

    Would there be any difference in comfort between these 2? Too similar? The f100 is a few point stiffer but is marketed as arm safety technology and such. The pb7 is a volkl, which as a brand is touted as being arm friendly, does the pb7 fall inline with the typical arm friendly volkl?

    Thoughts?

    Also, all are strung poly/multi, mid tension minus 2-3 lbs on the poly mains.

    Any major playabilty differences? I seem to hit similair with both. Didnt really feel like I played better with either. 2hbh may have better on the donnay, but ground strokes and vollys were about the same level.

    F100:

    Head Size:
    100 sq. in. / 645.16 sq. cm.
    Length: 27in / 68.58cm
    Strung Weight: 11.2oz / 317.51g
    Balance: 3 pts HL
    Swingweight: 321
    Stiffness: 69
    Beam Width: 23.5mm / 26.5mm / 23mm /
    Composition: Xenecore
    Power Level: Medium
    Stroke Style: Medium-Full
    Swing Speed: Medium-Fast
    Racquet Colors:
    Black / Orange
    Grip Type: Donnay Synthetic
    String Pattern:
    16 Mains / 19 Crosses
    Mains skip: 7H 9H 7T 9T
    Two Pieces
    No Shared Holes
    String Tension: 50-60 pounds

    PB7:

    Head Size:
    107 sq. in. / 690.32 sq. cm.
    Length: 27.3 inches / 69.34 cm
    Strung Weight: 10.5oz / 297.67g
    Balance: 1 pts HL
    Swingweight: 309
    Stiffness: 67
    Beam Width: 23mm/23mm/23mm/
    Composition: DNX, Carbon, Fiberglass
    Power Level: Medium-High
    Swing Speed: Medium
    Grip Type: DNX Grip
    String Pattern:
    16 Mains / 19 Crosses
    Mains skip: 8T 8H
    One Piece
    No Shared Holes
    String Tension: 50-60 pounds
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2012
    #1
  2. scotus

    scotus Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2005
    Messages:
    7,520
    Arm-friendliness is a relative term.

    Volkl's handle technology and Donnay's core material serve to make their frames more comfortable to a degree than those frames without such tech.

    However, no current technology can turn a frame with the stiffness of 70RA into an arm-friendly stick.

    If you are interested in Volkl, demo the Organix 10 295g. For Donnay, the XP Dual looks to be a good candidate.
     
    #2
  3. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,270
    I second the Volkl o10 295g recommendation. This is my racket for almost the last 2 years now. It is a great racket. I customized to 345G, 6 HL, and 335 SW. I just demo-ed newe wilson ps 6.1 95,new dunlop f3.0, m3.0, and new tF v02 320. I think the volkl blows them all away. I demo-ed a couple of the Donnay's when they first came out. I liked them but still the volkl is just more solid and very comfortable.
     
    #3
  4. goherd27

    goherd27 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2010
    Messages:
    233
    Location:
    Charleston, SC
    If your elbow is sore. Rest is probably best. Check out the theraband flex bar if you have not already. It did wonders for my tennis elbow.

    I have to agree that the Volkls, at least relative to my experience, were more arm friendly. I think you may have tried and did not like the Organix V1. The original V1 is very arm friendly and a good frame.

    You may want to reconsider the poly strings. I have used a gut/multi set up that has been very arm friendly. I also have a full gut set up for when I am playing a lot.
     
    #4
  5. TroutSc

    TroutSc Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    Messages:
    470
    thanks for the insight. I did try the xp102, didnt really gel with it, same on the x v1, x4. I think im still looking for the holy grail. Ill take back the f100 and stick with the pb7 a bit longer.

    I was hoping you guys would set me straight and I could show my wife .."see honey, i need to buy a new racquet!"

    right now we're both using the pb7's (I have 4 of them), and the london and the apd. Thats 6 sticks in the 6/7 months ive been playing. (plus atleast 5 other demos).

    mental case...
     
    #5
  6. scotus

    scotus Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2005
    Messages:
    7,520
    A very mild one at that. :)
     
    #6
  7. retrograde

    retrograde Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Messages:
    314
    Location:
    Southern California
    The PB7 and F100 both have relatively high static stiffness numbers (the RA numbers off the RDC machine). They also have relatively high vibration frequencies - a measure of dynamic stiffness. More details here:

    http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/cgi-bin/vibfrequency.cgi

    I hope the tech they have somehow moderates their inherent stiffness.

    If all else fails in the quest for a comfy frame that's a tad more "modern" than the heavier/smaller-head/flexier comfy sticks, I suggest trying the PK KI 5 315:

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/ProKennex_Ionic_Ki_5_315/descpageRCPK-KI5N12.html

    TW specs it at 11.8 ozs but my demo came in at 11.45 oz strung. Others are reporting similar weights. Swingweight felt like something in the 315-320 range. It's got much more pop than a London (which I've demo'd). I have TE so am picky.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
    #7
  8. goherd27

    goherd27 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2010
    Messages:
    233
    Location:
    Charleston, SC
    I have an extra Classic V1 if you want to try it at some point. It is a different feel than the V1.
     
    #8
  9. Bodycamp13

    Bodycamp13 New User

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2009
    Messages:
    47
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    suggestion

    Although a tad heavier, my C10 Pro Volkl is extremely comfortable. Even with Cyclone 16 (poly) I have to say it is one of the best frames I've played. I have demo'd a ton of racquets trying to replace my old 6.1 PSC.

    I would think that you could play with strings in the C10 Pro and make it extremely arm friendly - if you can get over the weight difference.
     
    #9
  10. tennisfreak73

    tennisfreak73 New User

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2012
    Messages:
    82
    while i haven't played with either, i do play with the donnay x-dual silver, which is the most power in the x-dual line. however, that is not to say this is a powerful racquet which it is not. you definitely need a to generate your own power and or have a powerful string setup. what i love about this line and this frame in particular is the amount of control and forgiveness it provides. i played with an aero pro before this and my arm and shoulder were excessively sore the next day. with the silver very little pain, just a bit of tightness and elbow is totally fine. donnay has made a name for itself as a preventative injury/comfort type racquet manufacturer and for me its been true to form.
     
    #10
  11. yemenmocha

    yemenmocha Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2006
    Messages:
    1,224
    I've demoed many from both manufacturers and I think Volkl is overall more arm friendly, especially the models mentioned above.
     
    #11
  12. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Messages:
    8,609
    Hold on a second... as I see things, it's not realistic to talk about "arm-friendliness" in any racquet without also examining the string type and tension in there. Some frames certainly have a more arm-friendly reputation than others, but that aspect can often disappear as soon as a cozy racquet is strung with a poly.

    The racquets listed at the top are both what I'd call "middleweights" that are also a bit firm. While they may play just fine, they don't carry the same inertia and stability of a heftier alternative, but their stiffness also doesn't help with absorbing the shock at impact with the ball, at least compared with heavier, softer options. String those middleweights with stiffer string like poly or kevlar and those aspects can be significantly magnified.

    Long story long... I've seen very good players with considerably "arm-friendly" racquets come down with nasty elbow problems after switching into harsher strings. If protecting your elbow is up near the top of your priorities, I'd say you'd be smart to stay away from the poly altogether, but don't be afraid to try out some of the heavier gear that our pals have suggested here. I'm a Volkl C10 lover, in part because my elbow loves it (I string with 16 ga. syn. gut as high as 63-64 lbs.), but they make several nice models.

    One other thing I noticed back when I was demoing lots of different racquets was that the constant switching from one frame to another was in itself rather hard on my arm. The constant re-adjusting to a different racquet can rack up a whole lot of extra mishits and those can make an elbow unhappy, too. Maybe try to pace yourself as far as switching from one candidate to the next.
     
    #12

Share This Page