Arm friendly racquet with power

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by Bjorn yesterday, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. Bjorn yesterday

    Bjorn yesterday New User

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    I'm looking for an elbow friendly racquet to replace my Head Speed 300.

    I'm an intermediate level player (turned 50 this year) and developed elbow and shoulder problems using an Aeropro Drive. Moved to the Speed 300 (RA 60) and problems went away. My form is what it is and is not going to change much at this stage.

    I love the 300 for its softer feel, its maneuverability, and its accuracy, but I'm looking for a little more help from the racquet in the power department. I feel I get pushed around on the court.

    I was really disappointed to see the stiffness of the new Speeds jump up to 66. I hit with the black MP demo (not sure about tension as the racquet was already strung...but it seemed high) and I felt my elbow almost immediately. Then tried one again when they were in stock (strung with RPM at 48) and this was better, but it seemed to lack the accuracy of the 300 (it did have more stability and pop though).

    I've read about all there is to read about arm friendly racquets on this form and others and I know that heavier, head light, low flex racquets are what I should be looking for. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these are advanced players racquets and are either too heavy or too low powered for my game.

    Just wondering if there is something I'm missing in my search (like a mid 60 RA stick that is still arm friendly). I've heard good things about some Prince racquets, but they are without a distributor in Canada so I can't demo one.

    Any suggestions would be helpful. Thanks!
     
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  2. TroutSc

    TroutSc Semi-Pro

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    im just now using the speed 300 myself, loving it so far on a long term demo. Have you tried the radical pro?
     
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  3. icarus180

    icarus180 New User

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    #3
  4. Sundan

    Sundan Rookie

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    I just discovered that Wilson blade 104 has a stiffness of 60,so i will demo that one today. It also have about the balance im seeking,5pts HL,but its very light so i suspect i would have to lead it up a little if i would buy it.

    I have a feeling it is a bit too powerful,but if i can control it i might consider to buy one.

    Im off now to the court,will be back at 21.30 or so. (18.13 where i live now :) )
     
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  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    HeadMicroGelOS or Mid, for 89 bucks, corrrectly strung here on TW.
     
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  6. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Pro Kennex rackets are stiffer but arm friendly because of their kinetic system in the frame.
     
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  7. ArliHawk

    ArliHawk Hall of Fame

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    #7
  8. RackofSlamb

    RackofSlamb New User

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    I hear Yonex racquets are good for this, but I have personally never tried one.
     
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  9. PhotoBlue

    PhotoBlue Professional

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    IG Radical Pro for sure. I switched to it because of an arm problem with APDGT. No problems with arm now and still has pretty good power.
     
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  10. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    The Pro-Kennex line is arm-friendly. I switched from the powerful Babolat APDGT to the PK Ki 5x with no problems. People on this board have even said that their stiffer frames, such as the Q5, are arm-friendly as well and probably more powerful than my racquet.
     
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  11. lobman

    lobman Rookie

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    I have used several Volkl models over the years and never had any elbow or shoulder issues, even with the V1classic which has a stiffness rating of 69. I have not hit with but hear good things on this board about the Volkl PB 7 also; its stiffness is 67. Finally, your string choice and tension for any racquet are significant factors in reducing the chances of arm problems.
     
    #11
  12. Bjorn yesterday

    Bjorn yesterday New User

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    Thanks

    For the suggestions. I can demo the Head racquets to see if the power is adequate for me (the flex ratings look good).

    The Volkl looks like it might be the ticket though. It certainly looks good on paper! It appears to be the racquet I was looking for and couldn't find.
     
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  13. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    IMHO, the Volkl C10 mp has the weight and the pop you may be looking for. Demo it if you can.
     
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  14. Anton

    Anton Hall of Fame

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    Leaded up Mantis 295 is the answer in my book :)

    You'll get a very comfortable frame with all the spin and power of stock APD.
     
    #14
  15. mrmike

    mrmike Rookie

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    I agree with this - C10 pro has good power, and a lot of comfort for a players frame. Some may not like the heft, my 2 (2010 models) weigh in at about 12.6 oz w/overgrip.
     
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  16. NetNinja68

    NetNinja68 Rookie

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    I have to agree with the OP. Check out the IGRP.
     
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  17. racertempo

    racertempo Semi-Pro

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    If your arm problems are serious then consider the Five BLX from Wilson. Wilson Triad in unmatched in terms of elbow friendliness. It is so incredibly soft due to the Triad that it cannot have the stiffness measured. They measured one a few generations ago and got a 17, so now they N/A the number with this technology.

    I don't care what other frames offer, Kennex, Cortex from Babolat, Volkl.......NONE come close to being as soft and good for your arm as a Triad from Wilson.

    The problem is there are limited frames with it in there and they are usually a little light and power heavy. My dad plays the Kahmsin Five BLX from Wilson and uses a full bed of Poly which tames the power a little and gives him good control. The bad thing is that ANY other frame now gives him elbow issues, so he is limited to Triad frames pretty much going forward.
     
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  18. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Another vote for Volkl, but not just the model I use - their C10. I've also seen and read about a few good experiences with their Organix 10's, which Volkl offers in both a heavier and lighter option.

    My experience with the C10 has been surprisingly good. I'm older, hit a one-handed backhand, and can hold down a very busy schedule that includes playing, teaching, and coaching high school teams. Although the C10 is a little hefty, it's super cozy with some extra flex through the hoop and supplies all the power I want (I string mine with 16 ga. synthetic gut).

    I've sampled a number of softer frames in recent years and found a few to be too soft to also give me enough liveliness or "pop", especially when those flexible racquets were also relatively light for me. Although you want comfort and "enough" power from your racquet, don't expect an extra-soft frame to have too much zip if it's also rather light - that's the trade-off.

    If your shoulder can't stand too much heft, maybe find your upper limit there first, then look for a flex rating in the low 60's that could make you happy. If your shoulder discomfort seems more connected with stiffer racquets or harsh strings, you might get great results from a softer racquet coupled with softer, more resilient strings. Good hunting!
     
    #18
  19. corners

    corners Legend

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    How do those Triad frames feel? Can you feel the ball at all or is it completely muted?
     
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  20. KenC

    KenC Professional

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    If you really like the racquet why not use more powerful strings, like NRG2 at a few lbs less than you normally string? If you are not a string breaker, the best bang for buck comes from natty gut, I know people who go 6 months on a single stringjob and their racquet still plays fine. Put gut in at a few lbs lower than typical and watch the power increase noticeably.
     
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  21. ramos77

    ramos77 Semi-Pro

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    DONNAY pro one 97 16x19 with nat gut
     
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  22. racertempo

    racertempo Semi-Pro

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    I played with him recently (he is in NJ and I am in NC), but in Dec we played indoor and I played a set with one of his Triad frames. He played 1 game with my Donnay X-P Dual Silver as I tried to explain how the Donnay should also be good on his arm. After 1 game he said he could feel too much vibration from the Donnay frame.

    As far as the Triad (Khamsin 5, older incarnation of the BLX that is now Five BLX) I liked the feel. The frame is very HH and I am used to HL, so from that point I felt like I felt the ball just fine. The SW is 343 for the frame which is very high and I think that and the balance help a player to still feel connected. I struggled to keep the ball in just from the power standpoint. It is a very unique technology and group of frames, but for a person with elbow problems there is nothing better, if you can deal with the frame specifications, which just about assume that you need power assistance if you have elbow problems......I guess that is right most of the time.
     
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  23. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    Have you considered improving your fitness level and adding lead tape? I feel that I can play with any frame out there with a relative overall flex below 63 getting power from the weight of the frame. I worked on losing a lot of weight and improving fitness levels a few years ago and my game is much, much better today. Both (improving fitness and using heavier racquets) involve a long-term commitment to improving as your game suffers in the short term - it's like improving your technique in one area - you lose more in the short term but have a better game and foundation in the long term.
     
    #23
  24. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    I'm having Golfer's Elbow issues from using a Babolat ProDrive Roddick for the last year or so, so I need to switch to something much less stiff. I noticed that it caused problems right from the start, but the power and control were so intoxicating that I thought I could handle it, but not any more.

    I demoed several racquets today and so far I liked the ProKennex Ionic Ki5, but I wasn't completely sold on it. I'm considering giving the Prince EX03 Tour 100 a spin. Does anyone else have anthing to recommend that's softer, but with some pop? I'm 4.0 over 50 yo.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2013
    #24
  25. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    There are many older folks that lead up a softer frame to get the power of a Pure Drive with less arm stress. The price you pay, though, is that you need good preparation and fitness to use such a heavy stick.
     
    #25
  26. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    Well, I'm hoping to be going lighter, not heavier. The PDR was a bit heavy for quick manuverabilty for me, especially on returns.
     
    #26
  27. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I'm not exactly one to promote tuning with lead tape as the solution to every racquet problem, but you may want to keep the option in mind. If you find a racquet that's otherwise comfy for you, but has that sluggishness you don't want, you might get improved maneuverability by adding some weight to your handle (lead tape under your grip or overgrip).

    Although this effectively adds weight to the racquet, it also makes it more head-light (HL) in balance. I do this with my gear on a regular basis because I really like a hefty, stable frame. Unless that somewhat heavy racquet has 9 pts. HL balance or even a bit more though, it feels sluggish for me. Just a thought.
     
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  28. I Heart Thomas Muster

    I Heart Thomas Muster Semi-Pro

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    Head Youtek Radical Pro. In stock form it's very comfortable and hits a mean ball.
     
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  29. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Your racket is not being "pushed around".
    No, YOU are being pushed around by your lazy shot prior to your opponent pushing you around.
    If you took the effort to hit YOUR shot better, harder, more to the corner, you would not be "pushed around", and instead, you would push around your opponent.
     
    #29
  30. Bjorn yesterday

    Bjorn yesterday New User

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    Thanks everyone for the helpful suggestions...except LeeD.

    Why in the world did you take time out of your life to post that comment? No one, not Djokovic and not you, hits every shot perfectly. It's got nothing to do with laziness. Some racquets are more stable and provide more power than others. At least this is what all the reviewers here at TW say and it's what they post in the Specs section for every racquet. With over 20,000 posts this should not be news to you. My previous racquet provided more stability than the Speed 300. It didn't get pushed around, but it wasn't kind to my elbow. Hence, my desire to find something else.

    Incidentally, I took one of the suggestions made by a helpful member of this forum and purchased a racquet from TW. It is more stable and powerful. People I play with regularly notice the difference...even on the same lazy shots.
     
    #30
  31. marosmith

    marosmith Professional

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    String is more important than the frame alone. Use gut at mid-low tensions. If you must get a new frame a radical pro or os would work.
     
    #31
  32. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    what strings do you use now?

    if you're using full poly, then try a hybrid with natural gut mains, or even a full bed of natural gut or a good multi-filiment. That will give you all the power and buttery comfort you need.
     
    #32
  33. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Exo3 Tour is VERY low powered and comfy. You will need to string much lower to get anywhere close to the power of the Babolat. I liked the Pro Kennex 7G a lot but I think the extended length was bugging my arm.
     
    #33
  34. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I demoed the Ki 5 and both versions of the EXO3 Tour 100 among others. As far as arm-friendly racquets go, I think the Ki 5 is one of the best to transition into if you like the PD. The EXO3 is more trampoline-like and I found it hard to control. You might also try the Pacific X-Force Pro. I liked it also.
     
    #34
  35. mongting

    mongting Rookie

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    Why don't you test natural gut on APD? Full bed of natural gut could neutralize the stiffness of the frame.
     
    #35
  36. donnayblack99

    donnayblack99 New User

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    Arm friendly= POG 107

    You can't go wrong with a Prince Graphite Original 107 for a player's stick that won't hurt your arm. If you can handle its weight, you'll love it.
     
    #36

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