Arm friendly strings

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Barnes68, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. Barnes68

    Barnes68 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Hi,

    Looking for some advice on some arm friendly strings. I'm not a big hitter and had some shoulder problems. Any suggestions?
     
    #1
  2. tennisplayer1993

    tennisplayer1993 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    703
    Location:
    All Around The World
    Head Sonic Pro Poly, I use it on my primary racket
     
    #2
  3. db10s

    db10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,973
    Location:
    S. FL/Maine
    Natural Gut.
     
    #3
  4. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    1,596
    Multis, thin gauges.
    I suggest Rip control 17 (which is actually an 18 gauge). Durable for its size, and soft like a pillow. I Hybrid it with NXT 17 and love this combo.
     
    #4
  5. PureAlph4

    PureAlph4 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 3, 2010
    Messages:
    768
    Why would you advise someone who describes themselves as having shoulder problems and not being a big hitter to use poly, even if it is considered a 'soft' poly?
     
    #5
  6. Korso

    Korso Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2012
    Messages:
    636
    Location:
    Virginia
    Natural Gut or any high end multi like Babalot Excel.
     
    #6
  7. HRB

    HRB Professional

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2011
    Messages:
    1,484
    The phrase "arm friendly" and "poly" should never be mentioned in the same sentence. I predominately use syn gut strung tight and hit heavy, but I string...so cost is not factor.

    Every once in awhile I string up a hybrid with poly mains, 10lbs. less than usual...play a great match ripping the hell out of the ball...feel it the next day in every joint in my arm...I then reluctantly cut them off...go back to my syn gut and have pain free tennis all the time.

    Sadly I've realized Poly is for kids and pros (if you hit hard).
     
    #7
  8. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    19,684
    Location:
    Central Florida
    #8
  9. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2006
    Messages:
    8,631
    Avoid both poly (including "softer" co-poly) and kevlar strings for sure, including hybrids. It's no secret that the diminished resilience in those string types puts more shock into the arm. Some folks can handle it, but many cannot... and they only find this out after sustaining an injury.

    Natural gut is much more expensive that other string types, but it really sits at the top of the heap in terms of arm-friendliness. Mulitfibers are also rather resilient and can deliver a soft ride at a more reasonable rate than natural gut. Many multis have been reviewed around here, so help yourself to the plethora of comments and feedback.

    One question: What racquet and string setup are you using these days, oh, and how long have you had the shoulder issue? (Okay, two questions.) Just curious, since shoulders can sometimes get grumpy if a new racquet is heavier than usual or if technique isn't so great that a player uses too much arm to hit the ball.
     
    #9
  10. 3fees

    3fees Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    2,034
    Location:
    NorCal
    Luxilon Big Banger Ace strung at lowest tension for your racquet with dampener , vibration is not good with muscle injuries in the arms and shoulders.
     
    #10
  11. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    19,684
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Luxilon and sore arms mix together like oil and water.
     
    #11
  12. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2012
    Messages:
    3,013
    I've got Dunlop Hexy Fiber 17 in my 2013 APD right now and it's quite comfy. Played 3.5 hours last friday with it with no pain. I could never last 3.5 hours with poly in that thing vs. the 4.0 guy I was playing with.

    There's a lot of string movement, but it's still a great string for the price.
     
    #12
  13. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    12,571
    Location:
    at the bottom of every hill I come to
    any decent multi, I would use a thicker gauge and lower tension.
     
    #13
  14. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,361
    Softest to hardest:

    1. Gut
    2. Multifiliment nylon
    3. Monofiliment nylon
    4. Co-poly
    5. Kevlar

    If you are not a string breaker, gut is your best choice. Next, a good multifiliment - read Mikeler's thread for multi ratings.
     
    #14
  15. fgs

    fgs Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,398
    Location:
    Vienna, Austria
    there is NO such thing as an armfriendly poly, no matter how soft it is or how soft anyone claims it to be.
    don't get me wrong, i play poly-hybrids myself, so i have nothing against poly as such, but i repeat myself: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS AN ARMFRIENDLY POLY.
     
    #15
  16. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2011
    Messages:
    3,144
    Location:
    The Desert
    #16
  17. JT_2eighty

    JT_2eighty Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,477
    If you're not a big hitter, definitely just go straight to Natural Gut.

    It lasts longer than multis (tension-wise), and if you don't hit hard or with tons of spin, can be quite durable. While more money upfront, it will last much longer than a multi that will need to be replaced more often, so you end up saving money over time.

    Natural gut, it is what all multis try to be.
     
    #17
  18. ishiun

    ishiun New User

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2012
    Messages:
    87
    Location:
    Tallahasse, Florida
    natural gut seems to be the most comfortable for your arm but its a tad expensive
     
    #18
  19. tennisplayer1993

    tennisplayer1993 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2012
    Messages:
    703
    Location:
    All Around The World
    well for me its very arm-friendly. but i also use luxilon strings and have no problems lol so I guess you're right.
     
    #19
  20. marosmith

    marosmith Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,021
    Location:
    Lafayette, Or
    Do this.

    8)8)
     
    #20
  21. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    6,720
    Note you'll want to take care of the gut a little more, too. Clip (within reason) stringy fraying, keep it as dry as possible, and don't leave it in the hatch/boot/trunk of your car in major weather swings. Apply some baby oil if it lasts you a long time to keep some sort of coating on it. There are purpose specific coatings for this, but...

    String savers might also be wise.
     
    #21
  22. Barnes68

    Barnes68 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Thanks for everyone's help!
     
    #22
  23. Rob1

    Rob1 Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    229
    Natural Gut
    X-1 Biaphase
    Excel Power
    The thinner the gauge the better
     
    #23
  24. JT_2eighty

    JT_2eighty Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,477
    Yea, for max durability, pick up some Babolat String Savers, and it can easily double or triple the life of a full-gut bed.

    I personally like the "stringy fraying", and find the gut plays better as it ages, but you can also trim the big frays so they don't further unravel like an old sweater.

    Also keep it away from moisture, never use it in the rain, and also it won't last as long on clay either. So if you play in those conditions, a back-up racquet with a good multi is a good idea too.
     
    #24
  25. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Messages:
    6,720
    Yeah, the big danglies is really what I'm talking about. Those can actually make the problem worse. Light frayingg (natural fraying) is normal :)
     
    #25

Share This Page