Arm strengthing help needed

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by gplracer, Jul 26, 2008.

  1. gplracer

    gplracer Professional

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    I am in my early 40s. I have played tennis since I was real young and I play 4.5. Recently I have been playing a lot. For me that means 3 days in a row of playing 2.5 hours of hard workouts. Sometimes my strength in my arm seems to go. I get where it is hard to hit a shot in the court with my forehand. My serve still has plenty of pop and my two handed backhand is fine but the forehand.... It is weak to the point that I can hardly form a correct shot. This happens after playing an hour or more. I figure that I need rest and it is probably from being out of shape and then playing too much. What would be some good exercises to do to help this condition?
     
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  2. cncretecwbo

    cncretecwbo Semi-Pro

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    bench, overhead press (standing) and pullups.
     
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  3. Il Mostro

    Il Mostro Banned

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    Don't forget to work the opposite muscle groups. So in addition to bench presses, also work your lats with both neutral, wide and narrow grips. The same goes for *all* muscle groups. A strong core and strong legs will help you get more than your arm into the swing. FWIW, I keep a lighter racquet in my bag as a back-up, so that when I am really gassed I make the switch. After the 3 hour mark, it really helps my old body.
     
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  4. cncretecwbo

    cncretecwbo Semi-Pro

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    heres a workout

    A
    squat
    bench
    pullups
    power clean

    B
    squat
    press
    row
    deadlift

    alternate A/B/A then B/A/B 3x a week. 3 sets of 5 for everything except 1 of 5 for deadlift and 5 sets of 3 for power cleans
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2008
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  5. BullDogTennis

    BullDogTennis Hall of Fame

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    you do realize those are mostly chest exercises right? he needs alot more than that

    id recomend working everything from wrist to forearm to bisept/tricept to shoulders and chest.


    do

    benchpress(shoulders,tricepts,chest)
    tricept extensions(tricepts,forearm(a little))
    dumbell bench(almost all small muscles in your arm and chest) <--one of the best workouts you'll get
    pushups(chest, tricepts) <--you can do em at home and effective, works endurance also.
    the spring grip things(forearm, wrist strength)
    forearm curls(wrist and forearms)
    dips(shoulders, chest, tricepts, forearms, wrist) <--best overall workout, but will take a while to get where you can do very many at a time.

    if you want a leg layout i could throw that one out there too.

    unless you wanna blow out your back, or have a strength coach DO NOT DO powercleans or deadlifts, if you do not have almost PERFECT form, you WILL hurt yourself, those arnt really neccesary for tennis anyhow.
     
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  6. cncretecwbo

    cncretecwbo Semi-Pro

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    ^^^

    powercleans are probably the best lift you can do, right after full clean and jerk.

    a novice lifter interested in athletic performance would be best served with the 3 day one i posted which is the one pulled from Starting Strength, with an extra pull added bc most people are bench-happy and need back work.

    EDIT: i dont have a lofting coach, my squat form is above average, deadlift form is good and powerclean is solid, so no, you dont need a coach if you take your time to learn with light weights
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2008
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  7. BullDogTennis

    BullDogTennis Hall of Fame

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    yes a powerclean is a great lift, i agree...but it is extremely easy for young people get extremely injured, and dead lift is even worse....this guy is in his 40's nothing against someone in there 40's but there bodys are getting to the point where it probably gets tough to do stuff then, unless they have been training for a while(which im assuming hes not if hes getting really tired from holding a racket)

    my advice is not worry about cleans or deadlift(unless you want to start with MINIMAL wait(when i say minimal i mean like the bar) because when you get bad form it can really jack you up...


    a little example-

    this spring i was workin out for football season(during our schoools tennis season) i was a jr going into my senior year. and we were doing cleans that day, i wasnt doing alot of weight, maybe 165 or 175,and im assuming when i was going down i was goin to fast, and not stoppin at my hips like one should. and when i got to tennis practice i started having trouble breathing, i just sucked it up, then that night when i settled down my back got extremely tight, went to the doctor and i got put on like 3 medicines for some kinda mid back strain...why i said that is because at least once every weak my back gets extremely tight and i can barely move. still...

    i do not feel it is neccesary for a guy looking for arm strength to put that much stress on his body.

    if he IS looking for some extra leg strength id say maybe do some light squats, but more so do some leg presses(both the ones where your kinda of leaning back, and the ones your like WAY leaning back. this isolates the legs alot and does NOT put a lot of pressure on the back.

    **anytime i say clean i mean a full clean from ground up to the chest, not the ones where you start at your hips.
     
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  8. BullDogTennis

    BullDogTennis Hall of Fame

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    ^^i put some brief explanations on WHY these will help this guy...

    i mean i cant argue really that powercleans wouldnt help this guy, but i just dont find it worth it for him to rick hurting his back doing them.

    i know i will probably NEVER do a powerclean again after high school
     
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  9. gplracer

    gplracer Professional

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    Thanks for the suggestions. I really appreciate it. Keep them coming if you have more.
     
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  10. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I completely understand what you're asking here - I don't always keep after my workouts on the weights, but when I do, I enjoy the benefits. What makes a big difference for me when I get back on the weights is if I use a schedule that's realistic for me to sustain over several weeks.

    Starting back in with a "too much too soon" approach is almost never productive and I encourage you to go easy on yourself for your first three weeks. The big issue there is that when we start a new form of exercise, we typically only break down at the outset and by this I mean the first two or three weeks. If you can go easy (but keep at it) for your first two weeks and then basically take a pause in your third week, your body can recover and begin making real progress when you get back to work in your fourth week. I learned this when I went through US Navy dive school and it's held true from what I've seen ever since. Think of when you or one of your pals has decided to get after their fitness and after three or four weeks the routine was interrupted by an injury or an illness. It's not a rare occurrence, but it can be avoided if you think long term and use a reasonable plan.

    I also want to point out that if your arm is getting tired over these long sessions, your legs should be getting tired, too or else your arm could be doing more to get the racquet on the ball than it needs to. Just something to check on, but given the length of your outings, you may be enjoying better endurance in your legs than in your upper half.
     
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  11. dman72

    dman72 Hall of Fame

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    We're talking overkill here.

    Do some pushups, pullups, and dumbell work 2-3 times per week, and you will feel the difference. I had skipped on the gym for about 6 weeks straight earlier in the summer. I went back to lifting a few weeks ago, and a few weeks in, the racquet feels like a toothpick again.

    My workout is:
    Hammer strength bench incline
    hammer strength bench decline
    easy bar curls
    triceps pulldowns
    dumbell presses
    hammer strength lat machine

    I do this once, maybe twice per week in addition to playing tennis, one heavy set (a weight I can lift maximum 8 times) and it makes a difference in a matter of a few weeks. I'm in the gym for about 30 minutes.
     
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