Arms

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Wilsonbro11, Jun 9, 2013.

  1. Wilsonbro11

    Wilsonbro11 New User

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    Does anyone have any methods to get your arm loose except for the obvious stretching.
     
    #1
  2. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Rather than static stretching, make sure you are doing a dynamic warmup in order to:

    "1. Increases body temperature allowing muscles to work more efficiently.
    2. Gets the heart and lungs ready for vigorous activity.
    3. Stretches muscles actively, preparing them for the forces experiences during tennis.
    4. Engrains proper movement patterns and the coordination needed in tennis.
    5. Wakes up the nervous system and gets the brain talking with the muscles.

    Pre-practice and pre-competition warm-up routines have typically focused on static stretching. While this type of stretching is still important for maintaining flexibility and joint range of motion, it really should be performed after play, not before practice or competition. This is a new way of thinking about stretching and flexibility, but recent research has shown that static stretching can reduce the force and power the muscle can generate and that this impaired function can last for over one hour."
    - http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Ga...ning_Dynamic_Warmup_and_Flexibility_Training/



    Most will want to warm up their legs and core and then their arms.


    Below is a dynamic warmup reccommended by trainer Suzanna McGee who often posts here as sxftlion:

    "Jog straight forward, 3 times around the tennis court, or appropriate distance if you are on the grass or in the park.
    Shuffle sideways one lap, switch the direction for another lap.
    Jog backwards one lap.
    Jog/shuffle carioca style half lap, and switch the direction the other half (carioca: cross in front one step, cross behind the second step)
    Walk on the toes only from one doubles line to the other or similar distance (36 feet).
    Walk on the heels only.
    Walking Knee Hugs – lift one knee high up, hug it with your arms and pull it to your chest, while rising high up on your other toe and holding the position for a second. Walk acros the court.
    Walking quad pull – in each step, grab your foot behind you and pull it to your butt, while rising on the toe of the other leg, and holding the position for a second.
    Jog across the court with lifting your knees as high as possible
    Jog across the court with you hands placed behind your butt palms out, and each step kick your heels into your hands on your butt. Be light on your feet and toes.
    Frankenstein walk – as you step, swing your straight leg as high as possible before you put it down on the ground and step with the other leg.
    Walking lunges with arms over your head.
    Walking lunges with upper body twists – step forward with your right leg. When you are at the bottom position, twist your body to the left and then maximum to the right. Then step forward with your left leg, and twist to the right and then to the left. Keep walking across the court.
    Sideways walking sumo squats – stand up straight, hands behind your head, chest and head lifted. Step with your right leg to the side and sink into a deep squat. Then raise yourself up while stepping in with the left leg. Step with your right into another squat and move across the court. Switch the leading leg and sumo-walk across the court again.
    Squat jumps and lunge jumps… just don’t overdo it so you don’t get tired too tired.
    Leg swings forward-backward – swing one leg forward and backward as high as possible, repeat 10 times and switch the leg.
    Leg swings sideways – swing one leg to the left and right in the maximum range of motion, repeat 10 times. If you balance is not great, you can hold on something.
    Elbow curls, arm circles, wrist circles.
    Huge arm circles – forward and backward. To challenge your coordination, move the arms in opposite directions: one goes forward, one backward."
    - http://www.examiner.com/article/best-dynamic-warm-up-before-a-tennis-match
     
    #2
  3. Greg G

    Greg G Professional

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    The last 2 times I've played, I put a warm compress on my forearm for about 5-10 minutes, 30 minutes before play (nagging twinge in the medial epicondyle)...it does wonders! Forearm felt very loose, and even after play I noticed there was very little discomfort, as compared to not doing this prior to play. Time to accept I'm getting old..but I love my hot compresses :)
     
    #3
  4. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Heat on the arm works great.
     
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  5. Wilsonbro11

    Wilsonbro11 New User

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    Do you use icy hot?
     
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  6. Greg G

    Greg G Professional

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    No, I use a heat pad which you microwave.. Real heat, not chemical :)
     
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  7. wallabeechamp

    wallabeechamp New User

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    Orlando, FL
    I typically do this. Arm swings while utilizing only my shoulders, arms just dead weight.
    HTH
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBIVeuXL6Yc
     
    #7

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