Asphalt Court or?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by QuErorZ, Jul 7, 2009.

  1. QuErorZ

    QuErorZ New User

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    Hi.

    I will build a tennis court for myself. I got everything ready except the surface:neutral:. Original hard court surface is way too expensive in Turkey. So i need a cheaper option. A friend told me about asphalt courts. Anyone know about asphalt courts? How does asphalt feel?
    Is there any other material can be used to build a hard court? I need some serious help about that. Please help me. Thank you.
     
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  2. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    Asphalt - the standard US public courts. They play just fine. They are also softer than concrete so it is easier on the legs. Pretty low maintenance also.
     
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  3. Ambivalent

    Ambivalent Hall of Fame

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    Asphalt is rough, plays slower, is more subsceptible to rough conditions, and will hurt if you fall down. It will also grind your shoes out faster.
     
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  4. QuErorZ

    QuErorZ New User

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    I am sorry. I don't mean regular hard court material. I mean "real asphalt" which is used on roads.

    Regular hard court is about 15000-20000 dollars in Turkey for 1 court only. I need something for 3000-5000. Way cheaper.
     
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  5. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Asphalt is barely acceptable, especially since it is not very durable where it rains. What's the weather like in Turkey?
     
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  6. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    I know what you meant. As I said, there are many, many public asphalt (tar-mac) courts here Stateside. Honestly, I would suggest either a plywood court or concrete. Here's why. You really need specialized equipment and the subsequent knowledgeable labor to lay down asphalt correctly. It's going to be expensive. While a properly framed plywood or a concrete court also take a long of time to do, they can be done by you. This reduces labor costs and the amount of specialized equipment. You could also just go grass. The courts may not be the longest lasting, the most professional looking or playing but it will be a court and it will be playable.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2009
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  7. Nonentity

    Nonentity Rookie

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    Just do your research on average durability, maybe real hard courts are a better deal because they last longer. I don't know these things, but im just saying think long term, especially for a such a big investment.
     
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  8. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I first played on an asphalt court. Asphalt can work fine. We first put down chalk lines. However, uncoated asphalt is rough and slows the ball down and pops it up. It also chews up balls and shoes.

    There are surfaces you can put down on top of asphalt using squeegees and rollers which will make it much more similar to a concrete court. After we did that, the court was much smoother and played faster.

    Make certain that you hire an experienced asphalt company which will guarantee the level of the court. Good luck.
     
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  9. volusiano

    volusiano Hall of Fame

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    One thing you should find out is the cost of ripping up the asphalt surface to replace it with something else if you don't like it, and factor this cost into consideration as well. And also the cost of maintenance to repair cracks and resurfacing if it needs to be done much more often than hard surface. Maybe after all those costs, hard courts are not that much more expensive after all.
     
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  10. mike53

    mike53 Professional

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    Grass plays fine and you can't beat the cost. You can always improve it later.
     
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