ATP ranked Coach... Worth it?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by syke, Apr 19, 2013.

  1. syke

    syke Professional

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    Anyone had a coach that used be be ranked on the ATP Tour?
    I've got an contact who is helping me to set up some lessons with a coach whose highest ranking was 300 on the ATP tour.

    Do you think it's worth the money in the long run? What tips or lessons should I specifically request for, that the usual run of the mill coaches without much competitive experience won't be able to provide?
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2013
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  2. eidolonshinobi

    eidolonshinobi Professional

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    Just keep in mind, great players aren't always good coaches.
     
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  3. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    2 things ATP men can do:

    Greater than 100 mph serve

    Good amount of side spin

    Learn everything you can about how they do it.
     
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  4. arche3

    arche3 Banned

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    Yeah its worth it. For the side spin exaggerate the across motion. Watch fed do that. Lots of racket speed.
     
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  5. tkoziol

    tkoziol Rookie

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    Just be careful, maybe only do 1 or 2 lessons. Don't sign up for a huge amount. One of the teaching pros I know is an ex-ATP player. Nice guy, amazing player...terrible coach. Watching him teach beginners, children, and older players is actually painful to watch. He does do well with high level players: advanced high school or collegiate (4.5+).
     
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  6. arche3

    arche3 Banned

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    I had lessons from former atp guys. You have to actually have fundamentals down to really benefit. Then you can get into the details of shot selection. Different spins for certain tactical advantages. Etc. . The nuts amd bolts of how to win
     
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  7. rkelley

    rkelley Hall of Fame

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    One of the coaches at my daughter's high school was an ATP player, highest rank in the mid 200's. He's about 50 now. I've seen the guy hit and he still has nice strokes. I think he'd be too much for even the top juniors around here.

    Regarding teaching: I saw him interact with my daugther's JV team and I saw him hitting with a high school boy. In neither case did he do much coaching. Certainly seemed like there were lots of opportunities to share his knowledge, especially when he was hitting 1:1 with the boy, but he didn't do it. I don't know the background so maybe the kid's hard to coach and just wanted to hit against a high level player.
     
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  8. The Meat

    The Meat Hall of Fame

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    I've had some good coaches and also have contacts with good coaches who have never been ranked in the ATP. They either played at the university level or they didn't choose to go pro due to obligations.

    Don't assume that a retired ATP player will be a better coach, pick one that has great references and has a solid knowledge of the game's aspects. Ideally he should be knowledgeable in different grips and different backhands, you don't want a coach who only knows how to hit a 2 hander but doesn't know the fundamentals of the 1 hander. From my experience older coaches tend to have an excellent grasp on every shot and play.

    Try out a coach for a day, if you like him then continue playing with him!!
     
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  9. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    Depends on what you're starting with and what you want out of it. If you're a beginner/intermediate player and are working on your foundation, learning the basic strokes or cleaning up technical flaws, then I wouldn't bother. That's the specialty of your everyday club pro. If you're already a tournament player and want to compete at the next level (compete at sectional level > national level, junior tennis > college tennis) then it makes more sense.

    As a junior I worked with a coach for a few months who had ATP experience as both a player and a coach. The only thing he ever told me about my strokes is that I'm hitting the ball well today, or I'm not hitting the ball well and should get cleaner. He's not there to fix my strokes. If I didn't have good strokes to begine with he wouldn't have wanted to work with me. What he taught me was more about strategy and in-game management. He wanted to mature/refine my game and make me use my brain to win and not just try to outhit the person across the net.
     
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  10. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

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    Having trained and tutored a great many coaches, some of whom have been ATP/WTA players, some who have played little competitive tennis and just about everyone else in-between. The ex ATP/WTA players did not make the best coaches, in fact it was very rare they did as in general they found it hard to relate to somebody who couldn't perform the skill in question.

    This guy might be great, so it's no problem, but he equally might not be - basically an ATP rank is no guarantee of a great coach.

    cheers
     
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  11. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    I think it's worth to try. But I don't think it will be for shot fixing, but rather for little tweaks as said up there. Which means he won't learn you how to hit a TS forehand, but when to hit a TS forehand.
     
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  12. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I watched the first of a series of serve videos today. It was sent to me from FYB for free, and what Will has done is to get Pat Rafter to demonstrate how he serves and what is in his head and how the serve feels to him. If he wants to carve a slice, he visualizes an exaggerated carving, though the dwell time does not really allow that. If the toss is not perfect, he makes micro adjustments to his motion to compensate. He basically uses the second serve for both serves. He strives to make the returner hit "outside the stencil," meaning not on the sweetzone, by making the ball spin and move in such a away that it is always eluding the racket.

    Will intervenes from time to time to make a point.

    That is the kind of inside-the-mind details that you should try to get from a pro.
     
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  13. arche3

    arche3 Banned

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    Jeff salzenstein seems like he would be a good coach for a rec player.
     
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  14. syke

    syke Professional

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    Well, this coach supposedly has played Nadal, Monfils, Tsonga, Berdych, etc... Just to name a few going by his stats on the ATP website.

    Shall see how it goes when I have the first lesson with him.
     
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  15. Bobby Jr

    Bobby Jr Legend

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    I know of a guy who was a top 100 ranked player (back in the late 80s) who became a coach in the 90s. Not only was he a terrible coach but he actually knew astonishing little about the finer points of technique when I spoke to him about it.

    Not all people who can do can teach.
     
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  16. Ducker

    Ducker Rookie

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    I agree with many of the above posters. An ATP player does not always make a good coach.

    Keep strongly in mind what it takes mentally to achieve an ATP point. These guys (not in all cases) are cut throat, selfish and competitive. Those qualities which made them competeive atp circuit doesnt translate well to coaching.
     
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  17. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Ask him to demonstrate a stroke and watch closely.
     
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  18. syke

    syke Professional

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    Yeah... he lost to Nadal in a tie break... So had he won it instead, he would probably be considered a goat... no?
     
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  19. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    What is the name of the coach?
     
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  20. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    Depends upon your level of play and what info which they have that a less experienced pro doesn't. How much of that additional info are you capable of absorbing and utilizing?
     
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  21. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Shhhh!!!!!!!! :mad:
     
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  22. pvaudio

    pvaudio Legend

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    The head of my home tennis club was a similarly ranked ATP player. Even now it's frightening how good he is and what he can do with what you think is a great shot.
     
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  23. jrs

    jrs Professional

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    I think it would be a great help - if you are an elite player or high level junior trying to make the pro level.

    As a recreational player - I would think what I need is someone who explain and correct my technique and run drills to train me. Doesn't need to be a pro player.
     
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