Balls that add to arm problems

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by lstewart, Mar 26, 2013.

  1. lstewart

    lstewart Rookie

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    Everyone focuses on racket stiffness and poly strings causing arm problems, which is very true. Has anyone else noticed that some types of balls can be tough on someone with elbow or wrist problems? I deal with both, so it is always a balancing act to not create too much damage. I just about can't play with Dunlop or Wilson US Open balls. Dunlop balls are very hard, feels like I am hitting rocks. The Wilson US Open ball is heavier and slower than the standard Wilson or Penn heavy duty championship ball. I did drills with my son last night using the local university team's standard practice US Open balls. I felt like I was hitting balls that were filled with water. Just heavier and slower, with alot more stress on my wrist. Anyone else notice this before? I know I've walked on the court where someone else provided the balls, and after 3 shots realized we were hitting Dunlop balls due to their hardness. Seems like at least in my case, the ball type is as big a factor in bringing out elbow and wrist issues as racket and string type.
     
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  2. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I always notice DunRocks and extra duty Wilson US Opens. I'm guessing they are the heaviest two balls made.
     
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  3. lstewart

    lstewart Rookie

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    Agree about those two balls. The heavy duty US Open balls are so heavy and slow that they completely throw my timing off. Everything just feels slow, weighed down, and sluggish.
     
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  4. mhj202

    mhj202 Rookie

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    Totally agree that they feel different (heavier) but I actually prefer the heavier ball as its seems to give me better ball feel.
     
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  5. DaveInBradenton

    DaveInBradenton Rookie

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    The OP asks a good question. The frame, the strings, the tension, and the ball are all factors that effect the impact shock to the wrist, arm, and shoulder.

    Dunlop makes a ball with "Abzorber" technology that they claim reduces the impact shock by 15%. I believe that I've seen the cans at Walmart, but I'm not sure.

    I couldn't find these balls on the TW site. When I tried to write a link to a seller, the censors at Tennis Talk deemed that my First Amendment right should be abridged. A quick search should reveal where they are sold.

    (Shame on Tennis Talk. It makes you wonder what else they arbitrarily decide we the people should not write here.)

    I've read that dead balls give the worst shock, followed by pressure-less balls (due to thicker rubber), but I can't find any scientific testing on this. Sounds right, but it's hearsay.

    I've switched from Penn pressure-less balls to Tretorn Micro X balls for my ball machine. They are very long lasting and don't loose bounce height, but expensive.

    Good luck,
    Dave
     
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  6. DaveInBradenton

    DaveInBradenton Rookie

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    Found this excerpt from an article that Tennis Talk won't let send the link"

    "The beginning, as we put it, is the ball. Different types of balls create different IMPULSE intensities,
    transfering varying amounts of energy upon impact with racquet strings. Without bringing a lawsuit
    down upon ourselves, we will quote industry spec's showing that Wilson U.S. Open Balls generate 7%
    more energy upon impact, than do Pro Penn's, while the Pro Penn's generate 8% more impact energy
    then Dunlop Abzorbers. These were developed specifically to help reduce the incidence or severity of
    Tennis Elbow and they do make a big difference. That's a reduction of either 15% or 8% of the shock.
    The Dunlop Abzorber Ball is endorsed by the American Institute of Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine.
    They feel just like any other standard ball during play and are U.S.T.A. and IFT Approved and legal.
    To our knowledge, we are the only source for the Dunlop Abzorber tennis balls anywhere in the world.



    Another often ignored issue has to do with balls used for practice. Tennis Pro's often carry quantities
    of balls with them in large teaching carts. You may have a large quantity of balls kept in a ball hopper,
    which you use to practice serving or when hitting against a ball machine. The problem is that such balls
    go dead over time, & it is a fact that human nature precludes us from wanting to throw things away,
    that we may still be able to use. So we are faced with the issue of dead balls, which are even worse
    for your arm than the worst of the live balls. The same issue comes up if using Pressureless balls.
    Which are in some cases even worse than dead regular balls. The answer to this problem is a simple
    one. Use Tretorn Micro-X balls for all practice, drilling & ball machines. These balls are exactly
    the same as the balls you normally use to play, but they never go dead. They are filled with air,
    that is encased in small micro balloons, rather than being loose inside the hollow ball. Due to the
    micro balloons, the air can't escape so the balls never go dead. These balls are both USTA & ITF
    approved & you'll not be able to feel any difference. True they cost significantly more than regular
    balls, but in the long run they have the lowest cost of use of any ball available. I still suggest using
    the Dunlop Abzorbers for play if possible, as they are slighlty softer than the Tretorn Micro-X's,
    but if you tend to use balls long after they are fresh, even using the Tretorn Micro-X balls may
    ultimately be a choice, as they last until the fuzz is gone. See all our balls on the Accessories page."

    All the best,
    Dave
     
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  7. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    Dave it's no a huge conspiracy. TT does not allow links to competitors. It's in the rules. Not a huge deal.
     
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  8. DaveInBradenton

    DaveInBradenton Rookie

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    Thanks, I'm reassured.

    It's just that I don't like strangers telling me what I can or cannot say.

    That's my wife's job.

    Anyhow, I've had my new PK Kinetic Pro 7G for almost two weeks now, I'm hitting numerous low-impact balls (thread topic) 3 times a week with gusto using low tension 17 gauge natural gut. Hopefully my shoulder issues will gradually be resolved.

    May the (Kinetic) Force be with you,
    Dave
     
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  9. ArliHawk

    ArliHawk Hall of Fame

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    I find Dunlops extremely hard. My favorite extra duty ball is the Pro Penn Marathon or Penn ATP Extra Duty. Yes, I guess that makes me a Penn fan.
     
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  10. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I"m a DunlopHDHardCourt proponent.
    Sure, it makes my first flat serve bounce a foot LOWER.
    Sure, my so called "winners" become just decent shots.
    But the fact I don't hit too many clean winners with them actually improves my overall tennis, and I don't have to scramble as hard to retrieve the opponent's good shots.
    If I hit with Wilson balls in 85 degree temps, I would claim 115 mph serves that bounce stomach to lower chest heights...:):)
     
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  11. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    I don't know, I like heavy balls, as I try to hit hard :)

    I'm usually using Slazenger (which are Dunlop's right?) and although they feel hard in the first 5 minutes after opening a can- I just go slower at the beginning of the warm up, to protect the arm and then they are golden.

    (Except of course when they feel a bit deflated even when fresh out of the can- having bought a couple of cases last summer....)
     
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  12. lstewart

    lstewart Rookie

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    I don't play well with super fast balls, as they are tough to keep on the court when hitting hard. But the Dunlop balls I've used, and the heavy duty Wilson US Open's just kill my arm. If I play with them two days in a row, my wrist is shot.
     
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  13. retrograde

    retrograde Rookie

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    For many years, I played with boxes of Dunlop Grand Prix's. When I started having elbow/wrist problems, I switched to Penn's from Costco. The Penn's seemed softer but didn't last nearly as long as the GP's.

    I thought about trying the Dunlop A Players since they're supposed to be softer than the GP's.

    But I ended up buying a box of Penn ATP's. They don't last as long as the GP's but come closer than the regular Penn's and seem comfortable. I think I'll be sticking with the ATP's for a while.

    Hint: Get the TW gift cards when they go on sale before Thanksgiving. Then use the cards to buy cases of balls when free shipping is offered.
     
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  14. MesQueUnClub

    MesQueUnClub Rookie

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    The babalot balls are nice and easy on the shoulder.
     
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  15. corbind

    corbind Professional

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    DaveInBradenton, that's quite interesting reading. Who wrote that?
     
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  16. djNEiGht

    djNEiGht Professional

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    the Volkl balls feel like rocks. One doubles match, I opened a fresh can of Volkl balls. While warming up, one of the opponents picked up and stared at the ball for a second then went to his bag and opened up a can of the generic Penn.

    Thought I scored by getting those Volkl balls for a cheaper price...
     
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  17. DaveInBradenton

    DaveInBradenton Rookie

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    The Tennis Warehouse Tennis Talk Forum censors will not allow me to post the source.

    We must comply. Resistance is futile.

    Sincere regrets,
    Dave



    (top secret email sent to you)
     
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  18. lstewart

    lstewart Rookie

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    I've done this as well. Started warming up, hit a couple of shots, thought "OUCH", looked at the balls and saw they were Dunlop, and broke out a can of standard Wilson or Penn Championship balls.
     
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  19. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    Wilson US Open are not bad at all. The top of the line babolat ones are great too.

    i refuse to play with tennis balls once they get soggy or wet. i throw them out, but i have a friend who has the bad habit of trying to salvage them by leaving them out in the sun to dry...
     
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  20. njboy

    njboy Rookie

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    Pressure less balls

    Are very heavy
     
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  21. Fifth Set

    Fifth Set Professional

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    Good thread topic. Have definitely noticed that balls make a big difference in arm pain. Dunlops are my kryptonite for sure. Avoid Wilson US Opens too.

    Have tried so many in search of quality with the right feel.

    Ordinary Penn Championships were fine for me until 1/3rd of them started coming out the can dead or fluffing up within a few minutes. Princes no longer available, Volkls also too hard, blah, blah, blah.

    Pro Penn Marathons working ok for me. Just kind of pricey.
     
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