Basic Tennis Questions

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by anandsap123, Jul 8, 2013.

  1. anandsap123

    anandsap123 New User

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    Hey all,
    I am looking to play some high school tennis this coming school year. I just had a couple basic questions.

    So, I have the whole "low-to-high" thing down but my balls are still going out, but barely. Any tips on how to hit with more topspin that actually work?

    How does one hit a one-handed backhand or a slice backhand? I am completely clueless on this question so any advice helps.

    That is all, for now!

    Thanks.
     
    #1
  2. newpball

    newpball Legend

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    What do you understand as "the low to high thing"?

    Don't you think it make more sense to learn to hit flat balls with consistency and correct placement first?
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2013
    #2
  3. lightthestorm

    lightthestorm Rookie

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    Hey. First, if you want to have a shot at getting a top 5 rank on your team (unless they are bottom feeders)... take private lessons. If you can't afford that, go to the weekend clinics at the local YMCA or country club.

    Don't worry about a one handed backhand or slice. Learn a two handed backhand... much easier for beginners-intermediate players imo. Also, you should learn how to serve, exchange groundstrokes, and volley (especially volley... I guarantee your high school coach will love you) before learning to hit a slice or dropshot.

    You can hit topspin by brushing the outside of the ball... If the stringbed moves or fuzz is getting stuck on your racket, that's a good sign that you are hitting topspin.

    Remember to bend your knees as you hit to get under that ball.... have your racket face semi closed to ensure the ball stays in. You should be aiming to get the balls 2-3 feet above the net.

    If you have anymore questions about basic technique or how a HS team works.... feel free to ask. I've been playing HS tennis since 7th grade!
     
    #3
  4. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    #4
  5. anandsap123

    anandsap123 New User

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    Also what are some second serve tips that will help me be more consistent?
     
    #5
  6. lightthestorm

    lightthestorm Rookie

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    Second serve is overrated for beginners... just worry about consistency and placement first then worry about differing the first and second serve.

    I'm assuming you haven't played tennis for more than a year.

    PS. I just saw your other thread... I will get you back on that.
     
    #6
  7. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    Good tennis players can control the ball. They can consistently put it in any part of the court they choose. They have touch. They can hit drop shots, they can lob well. They might hit hard and with topspin but if you challenge them to a match, they can probably beat you with out hitting it hard. They can make an opponent look pretty silly by making them run all over the court.

    Once you get ball control, you won't have a problem with your second serve. Remember, it's a game of skill and not just about muscle.
     
    #7
  8. anandsap123

    anandsap123 New User

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    @Steady_Eddy Thanks! That is really good advice!
     
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  9. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I agree with this, but I'd frame the thought more the other way around. I'd say that the first serve is overrated, but that's only if you waste it all the time thinking that you need to swing out of your shoes and go for an ace. Many high school players will do too much of this, miss maybe nine out of ten first serves, and then their opponents get to return mostly those weak second serves through most of their matches.

    As you develop your serve, the motion, tempo, and general effort you put into delivering both your first and second ball ought to be about the same. As a high school player, you have the size and strength to hit both a flatter serve as well as a "safer" ball with sidespin. Remember that to send that ball with both some velocity and more spin though, you need the racquet speed that comes with your full motion. No patty-cake second serve!
     
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