Beginner---help!!!!

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by tin, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. tin

    tin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2008
    Messages:
    211
    Location:
    Philippines
    i'm planning to start playing tennis after graduation in university, that's this march. im 19,female. i haven't played tennis at all. i need all the information i can have regarding starting playing tennis for beginners -----from trainors, trainor fees, racquets, apparel.....and anything you all think i need to know.. thanks...=)
     
    #1
  2. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    Messages:
    9,132
    Location:
    tennis courts
    uh...if you are complete beginner i suggest lessons. but becareful who you pick-some coaches are terrible. apparel doesnt really matter except shoes. for racket...get something light and with a big head size.
     
    #2
  3. supertrex

    supertrex Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 12, 2008
    Messages:
    431
    Do you have FS?

    Anyawys if you can manage heavy racquet to start 11.0 ounces +, 95" headsize or 100. then I think ull do fine progressing quick. Dont go oversize and too light racquets. unless you are really small and weak.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2009
    #3
  4. CoachingMastery

    CoachingMastery Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,077
    Location:
    Utah

    Tin, read Tennis Mastery, a book that I wrote specifically for players who want to avoid the common pratfalls of learning tennis incorrectly and then spend their life trying to find bandaids for all their problems. (It is available here at Tenniswarehouse and you can read reviews among those who have read it to see what they think too.)

    At 19, you have a lifetime ahead of you, enjoying the game at levels you are capable of reaching. (Instead of simply dinking, pushing and bunting balls over the net to "play"!)

    Getting good lessons, understanding the game through various websites, reading books, watching tennis on television, and checking out DVD's that are available all will help you.

    Good luck.
     
    #4
  5. [osu]ilovecows

    [osu]ilovecows Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2007
    Messages:
    170
    #5
  6. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    Tennis Mastery, you say? You'd think I'd have thought to look into something such as this by now. Doh!

    Thanks, will check it out soon.

    Matt
     
    #6
  7. Sangria Munky

    Sangria Munky Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Messages:
    326
    I suggest WILSON KFIVE (light and big headsize)

    SHOES: NIKE CITY COURT II (LIGHTWEIGHT, REASONABLE PRICE GOOOD DURABILITY "XDR"
     
    #7
  8. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    6,783
    Just because she is a beginner and a female doesn't mean she needs a big headsize and light racquet folks...really, haven't we moved beyond this yet?

    OP...Tennis Mastery is a great place to start. Also, can you tell us a bit about what, if any, athletic background you have?
     
    #8
  9. dakels

    dakels Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2005
    Messages:
    359
    Tin,
    I think you are making a good move by trying to get as much information as possible before you commit. The biggest thing that will help you the most when starting out is the obvious, a good coach. Next is a good network/community to play with. At this stage I would be least concerned about expensive gear.

    The web sites and information posted is a good place to start. I would then start talking to friends who play and where go to where they play. Start finding teachers and lesson programs. I would specifically start looking for a group session for beginners. This will allow you to acclimate into the tennis environment with other beginners, start with a low monetary investment, and meet a lot of people at once to build your tennis social network. You can also ask the group session instructors there for private lessons.

    When looking for an instructor there are a few things to consider. To put it briefly, in the beginning, I would be looking for someone who is experienced with USPTA or PTR cert and makes a living out of teaching tennis. I would try at least 3 different instructors at first. Try to have 2-3 lessons with each then at the end have a 10 min discussion on what they would plan for your development. You want to find an instructor who you mesh with and has a style which you should find comfortable and inspiring, but also challenging and authoritative. Lessons will be key at this developmental stage. You should try to have as many lessons and drills as possible based on your time and budget. Look to get reinforcement from good alternative sources like group lessons, ball machines, wall. Speak with your instructors about so they can guide your solo practicing habits for proper techniques and focuses when hitting against a wall or machine. Ask about fitness drills and focuses as well such as strength training, core strengthening, lateral movement and other tennis specific exercises.

    When looking at gear, think inexpensive for now. Look for deeply discounted sale items, not beginner items. Look at clearance and sale items, for instance this prince TT scream can be a good starter racquet for women.
    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCPRINCE-TTSCRM.html
    For $50 it's a solid racquet that is middle of the road in a lot of ways giving you flexibility to learn and adapt. In a year or 2 you can look to buy a different, more expensive racquet as you understand more of your own needs and swing style. Get tennis good tennis shoes. Look for clearance items but for your first time, you may want to get it local and not online so they fit perfectly. Clothes don't really matter as long as you are comfortable and wearing fairly appropriate clothes for the court.

    Overall, try to get as much information as possible and keep an open mind about training an trainers. Communication with experienced people is key, as long as you weigh the information fairly. Nobody has all the answers so make sure you take everyone's advice with a level head. After some time you will be able to judge which direction you want or need to go and how hard you want to push.

    Good luck and have fun!
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009
    #9
  10. GeorgeLucas

    GeorgeLucas Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2006
    Messages:
    407
    As many board members will attest, your racquet should be 90 square inches - 12 ounces or more, and head light. Because this is what Roger Federer uses and Federer is the man.
     
    #10
  11. Geezer Guy

    Geezer Guy Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2005
    Messages:
    2,792
    Location:
    Big Canoe, GA
    tin - Tennis is a great sport that you can enjoy the rest of your life. I think getting lessons from someone right off the bat is important. You'll build a lot of habits the first few months, and it's best if they're GOOD habits. As for clothing, just go with something comfortable. You don't need to build a clothing wardrobe just for lessons and learning. Good solid shoes are important, but they don't need to cost a lot. As for your first racquet, I'd suggest something inexpensive to begin with. Buy a pre-strung racquet with a grip size and weight that feels comfortable. Later, after you're sure you want to continue with tennis - and you determine just how serious you want to be - then you can upgrade to a more expensive racquet if situations warent. Good Luck!!
     
    #11
  12. Topaz

    Topaz Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2005
    Messages:
    6,783
    Did I say that?

    Why not something mid-plus? And a bit heavier? Seems a good way to learn proper technique from the get go.

    If she has some kind of athletic background, then I would definitely recommend *against* the OS, light racquet.
     
    #12
  13. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    I agree that an expensive racquet should not be valued too highly at this stage in her development, but she should still have some standards in mind that her frame should meet. Obviously she is still new at this, so at this moment in time she will most likely have no idea what these standards are though. All I'm saying is: there's a huge difference between a 10$ racquet and a 60-80$ one. She will be doing herself a huge favor by skipping the whole Walmart racquet phaze from the start and buying a quality frame that she'll most likely use for a long time.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009
    #13
  14. user92626

    user92626 Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    6,182
    IMO, beginners, which I am one, needs a light and oversized racket that is hit-able. Weight and the difficulty of finding the sweetspot should not be a distraction at this stage.

    I rather focus on footwork and form. When these elements are thorough, transition to better equipment, tactics and athleticism is just a matter of how far you can and want to go.
     
    #14
  15. CoachingMastery

    CoachingMastery Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,077
    Location:
    Utah
    I usually try not to self promote my books here, however, when I see a beginner wanting to establish good foundations and seek their potential, I can't resist mentioning it! I do try to let others speak about my books who have read them.

    If you do read my books, I would like your feedback too!

    Thanks!
     
    #15
  16. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    Yeah, plus I've seen your excellent instruction on the serve on youtube. :)
     
    #16
  17. tin

    tin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2008
    Messages:
    211
    Location:
    Philippines
    thank you so so much guys..i'll try to keep all those things in mind...

    i used to play badminton and table tennis for my school when i was younger..but that was a long time...it has probably been four years since i've played

    and i'll check out this coach i've discovered this saturday....can't wait til i finally graduate from uni and start hitting the tennis courts...
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009
    #17
  18. tin

    tin Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2008
    Messages:
    211
    Location:
    Philippines
    what's an FS?
     
    #18
  19. crystal_clear

    crystal_clear Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2008
    Messages:
    848
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    You are so lucky to have a fresh start.
     
    #19
  20. Sangria Munky

    Sangria Munky Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Messages:
    326
    big headsize mean easier to hit, less mis-hits
     
    #20
  21. VERRIC

    VERRIC New User

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    19
    Before you graduate take some classes at school. They should have some PE classes just for credit. For rackets check out you thrift stores. You may find something that may be 2- 5 years old for like $2.00 - to $10.00. Some of the tennis coach may have a racket for you to use also.
     
    #21
  22. orangettecoleman

    orangettecoleman Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,208
    Location:
    Mesa, AZ
    You'll get a million different answers about the racquet thing. that's all people do here is argue about what racquet people should use. Anyway, get a racquet of some kind (oversize is probably best to minimize frustration) and some tennis shoes, and do a little beginning class. That's what I did and it worked fine to get me started. Also having a book around to look at helps as well. it's kind of tough to learn from online sources because you have a million people telling you a million things. I like the Tennis for Dummies book by Patrick Mcenroe. It has the basic information and strokes and what not. have fun learning!
     
    #22
  23. defrule

    defrule Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    826
    I honestly don't think anyone needs to start learning with an oversize racket. I think a 100-110sq.in racket with maybe 300g is quite reasonable to start with.

    Besides, aren't those huge oversize rackets really expensive?
     
    #23
  24. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2008
    Messages:
    5,484
    Location:
    Stillwater, OK
    Some are, yes. I loved the NBlade OS when I was a beginner, and still enjoy the way it feels now. Tin would do well to look for a used one, IMO. Why do they have to stop making every decent frame? I wanted to try the mid plus, but of course they were gone before I got the chance.

    Matt
     
    #24

Share This Page