Benefits of Aerobic Conditioning

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by chess9, Mar 23, 2008.

  1. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    http://faculty.weber.edu/molpin/exercisebenefits.html

    Increases the diffusion of Oxygen capacity in the lungs
    Enhances the exchange of oxygen from the lungs to the blood
    Increase in surface area of alveoli
    Increase in diameter of capillaries, veins, and arteries
    This means more oxygen is making it to the cells where it can efficiently produce more energy

    Increases depth of breathing
    Not only is this a more relaxing way of breathing, but it also gets more air into the lower parts of the lungs where greater levels of oxygen exchange occur; the lower lobes of the lungs have greater capillarization
    This increases the amount of oxygen circulating through the bloodstream


    -Robert
     
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  2. Gmedlo

    Gmedlo Professional

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    Is there a similar list available pertaining to anaerobic conditioning that you know of? I'd like to see how they compare.
     
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  3. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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  4. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Funny, because I am best on the tennis court after a lot of cycling.
     
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  5. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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  6. mary fierce

    mary fierce Banned

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    Your definition of efficiency eludes me. If your body is reacting so as to use more oxygen, this is LESS efficiency (as in a car that needs more gasoline to get from here to there). Using more oxygen also produces more oxidative waste products, which may be carcinogenic.
    Also, proliferation of tissue is not necessarily a good thing (you mention increased alveolar area). For example, proliferation of glial tissue in the brain is commonly a response to injury. You seem to assume it is a benefit, when there is no evidence presented of this.
     
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  7. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Did chess9 actually define efficiency in his post? The efficiency that is mentioned is in terms of how much energy is produced for a given amount of glucose (or other nutrient) rather than how much oxygen is required.

    I believe that the efficiency claim arises because aerobic (cellular) respiration is considerably more efficient than anaerobic respiration. It uses fuel/nutrients (glucose, fatty acids, amino acids) more efficiently -- significantly more molecules of ATP are generated with aerobic respiration than with anaerobic respiration.

    I believe that an athlete who possesses a greater VO2 max than another, should be able to produce energy (ATP) more efficiently (aerobically) than the athlete who has exceeded their ability to generate energy in this manner.

    I think that benefit that is claimed by the OP (and his source) is that aerobic conditioning allows the athlete to effectively utilize oxygen, when needed, to produce energy. Perhaps I am missing the point that you are attempting to make. If so, please enlighten.

    I'm curious, do you have any evidence that increasing alveoli surface area does not yield any benefit? It appears that the OP merely extracted this info from the compilation from Dr. Michael Olpin. [FONT=arial, Arial, Helvetica][FONT=Verdana,Geneva,Sans-Serif,Helvetica,Arial][/FONT]

    [/FONT]
     
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  8. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, I noticed the same thing years ago, using an exercise bike or other cardio equipment. 10 to 20 minutes of cardio before heading out to the courts helps immensely. I'm able to tap into efficient energy systems very easily after the cardio workout. It appears the cardio also helps to boost adrenaline and endorphin levels.


    Yes, you can probably train the anaerobic systems, to some extent, by playing tennis. Interval training also helps towards this end.

    Up until recently, I assumed that tennis was primarily, but not exclusively, an anaerobic activity. It is a sport that is characterized by intermittent bursts of activity of variable durations & intensities. It seems that the ball is really only in play about 20% of the time spent on the courts. However, the assumptions drawn from these characteristics might be flawed.

    A few weeks ago, I came across a manual for USTA Player Development. It includes a section on Exercise Physiology in Tennis. It states that the physiological demands of tennis are quite complex and actually utilizes 3 different systems that continually function to provide the energy needed for muscle activity and replenish energy stores. The 3 systems are:

    ~ An immediate energy system for short bursts (10 seconds or less). This is the so-called ATP-CP (creatine phosphate) energy system.

    ~ A short-term energy system which is the primary source of energy for activity lasting from 10 sec to 2 minutes -- Anaerobic glycolysis.

    ~ A long-term energy system for events lasting longer than 2 minutes -- Aerobic respiration.

    The manual references several sample heart rate profiles recorded from players during several sets of singles. It shows that, during the course of play, the heart rate remains in the aerobic heart rate for much, if not most, of the match.
     
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  9. Phil

    Phil Hall of Fame

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    This is true, so why, I wonder, has this part of the forum recently become something akin to a bodybuilding forum. Reading all that stuff, some of it bad advice, you'd think that cardio is a thing of the past. As ANYONE who has played tennis on a relatively high level knows, that is bogus. Obviously, one has to do BOTH, weight training and cardio, and in sufficient doses.
     
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  10. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    I lift weights a lot, and do nearly zero cardio save for punching the bag occasionally and playing tennis.

    I do not feel fit on the tennis court at all however. My ability to get oxygen to my brain feels diminished and it interferes with my ability to make good, quick decisions on court.

    Last year when I was cycling 10-15 miles every other day, I was a monster on court. I could play for 3+ hours and moved so well on the court. I'm a huge advocate of weightlifting, but I'm not seeing the benefits on court.
     
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  11. snoopy

    snoopy Professional

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    And what's the best way to improve your aerobic conditioning? Probably through Tabata style sprinting or cycling, not very long jogs. These sprints will work on both your aerobic and anaerobic strength.
     
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  12. snoopy

    snoopy Professional

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    There's a thread somewhere on the boards where serveitup911, a D1 player, describes his team's fitness routine. They do some heavy weightlifiting and he finds that it helps his game. He thinks weightlifting is important to do well in men's tennis.

    Obviously what works for some people does not mean that it works for everyone. I think all tennis players should at least do some light weightlifting. It is important to do exercises to prevent injury. You don't want to look like one of those Kenyan marathoners that's all skin and bones. That can't be good for tennis players either.
     
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  13. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    I'm not sure what the principal argument is in this post.

    If it's a discussion between aerobic vs. anaerobic conditioning schemes, then anaerobic wins hands down. It's been proven to develop VO2 max more quickly than normal aerobic schemes. Anaerobic threshhold schemes stimualte capillary development at a much higher rate than aerobic programmes. And so on.

    If, however, this is a argument against using only tennis to get into "tennis shape", that I agree. You should do some kind of conditioning in addition to tennis in order to get properly fit for tennis. Strength training is not enough, unless you're actually doing real conditioning with it.

    To derive real benefits, it has to be much longer than what's prescribed for weight loss. Conditioning is conditioning. I've seen people do Crossfit-style schemes where it goes up to an hour.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2008
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  14. snoopy

    snoopy Professional

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    Are you suggesting 400m tabata laps? I'm sure that will whip you into shape. I don't think I can do that, I might die, ha ha. I'd really have to take my time and work up to that.
     
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  15. tricky

    tricky Hall of Fame

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    I do agree that aerobic capacity is the most important element, next to injury prevention, in your conditioning for most sports. It doesn't matter how strong or explosive you are at tennis if you can't last more than 15 minutes. To that end, injury prevention and conditioning should hold higher priority then strength training.

    In regards to the conditioning itself, there are various ways to approach it. I've always argued that if you had to choose between HIIT cycling and lower intensity cycling, the latter has significant advantages because it's less demanding on your recovery abilities, especially if you're playing tennis matches that week. Offseason condtioning can be more elaborate than when you're trying to improve or merely mantain shape through the playing season. And so on.

    If you were a S&C coach for the team, you would probably design around various modalities, in a periodized scheme. One day, you may have the athlete run low-intensity, another day do sprinting, and another do complex training. What you design for a tennis player, in terms of conditioning itself (ignoring the power aspect of training, which is very sports-specific), would still be different than the football player. You may plan for deloading phases, so that improvement can be sustained predictably for a very long cycle.
     
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  16. chess9

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    I did not mean to imply that one needn't train anaerobically OFF the court. I meant simply that some of your anaerobic training is actually occurring ON COURT. My apologies if I left anyone with the contrary impression.

    But, at my age, I play mainly for entertainment value. I still enjoy winning, but being fit overall is more important to me. I've already played college tennis 40 years ago, so now I'm just sliding 'home' as carefully as possible. :)

    -Robert
     
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  17. rosewall4ever

    rosewall4ever Semi-Pro

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    Great find!!
     
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  18. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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  19. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    When it comes down to energy demands and fitness for competitive tennis players, it does not appear to be a matter of aerobic vs. anaerobic conditioning. As I mentioned in post #8 above, both types appear to be very important. One type should should not be dismissed in preference for the other.

    If you had asked me this a month ago, I would have agreed that both types of conditioning should be considered but anaerobic would be somewhat more important. However, the section on Exercise Physiology in Tennis (pages 40-47) in a USTA document, USA Tennis High Performance CTC Manual, clearly indicates that 3 different energy systems (often concurrent) are utilized for the demands of competitive tennis -- both aerobic and anaerobic conditioning are important to meet these needs.

    dps.USTA.com/usta_master/usta/doc/content/doc_437_23.pdf
     
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