best beginners racquet?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by hartofalyon, Apr 13, 2007.

  1. hartofalyon

    hartofalyon New User

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    as the title says. thanks a bunch.
     
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  2. White_Rice

    White_Rice Rookie

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    Weed!!!!!!!!
     
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  3. supafly_81

    supafly_81 New User

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    I would say a fairly cheap racquet, If you want to start from the ground up. I started with those recreational Wilson rackets then as my game got to a competitive level, I upgraded my racquet to a players racquet.

    But if you got the money a good racquet I think would be nice to start with is a Wilson nFury. It's light but I think it would be good for a beginner.
     
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  4. hartofalyon

    hartofalyon New User

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    weed racquets are way too expensive for just a racquet to learn from. i was considering using one of those cheap prestrung you can find at sporting goods stores, but wanted something a bit better. essentially, i would like a racquet that i can learn from, relatively easy to hit, and when i my game gets to the intermediate/advanced level, the racquet will still be able to keep up. i'll take a look at the nfury.
     
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  5. theRadical

    theRadical Rookie

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    that was funny
     
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  6. pow

    pow Hall of Fame

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    Depends on how much you want to spend and whether or not you're fit.
    My friend got TE from using racquets that were too heavy when he first started.

    It's your preference, many beginners use Oversize racquets because it seems less intimidating but if you have relatively good hand eye coordination and plan to stick with tennis, I'd recommend the Head LM Radical 98/106 or Wilson nFury 100. These two racquets are not power sticks like many people buy to start with so you will need to develop some strokes when you use them. I believe many people prefer to weight up the nFury a bit.
     
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  7. hartofalyon

    hartofalyon New User

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    i actually had the lm radical os last year when i briefly picked up tennis. i liked it a lot so maybe i'll look into picking one up again.

    does it make no sense at all to get a pro racquet like an aeropro drive or nsix-one 95 ncode? i get the jist of hitting the ball, but still don't have good control over it. when i try hard, the balls tend to fly out and never stay in court.
     
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  8. pow

    pow Hall of Fame

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    It can get frustrating playing with a frame that does not suit you. The racquets you mentioned are acceptable but at the same time, beginners often have not developed the right muscles and proper technique and will often hurt themselves with it. My fried used a 12 oz racquet with a small head and shanked the ball a lot and had problems swinging it for a while match and ended up developing TE.
     
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  9. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    ^^^Sounds an awful lot like a beginner I was watching hit today in a private lesson. Big, oversize, light, powerful frame>>>> Didn't get one ball in the court. He did hit the back fence several times though.
     
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  10. rhcolt07

    rhcolt07 New User

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    I agree with supafly from personal experience, starting off with a racquet pre-strung from a sporting goods store would be a cheap way to start off. I bought a Wilson Impact from my local store and it's lasted and hit pretty well for me. Then, I could decide if I was going to like this sport or hate it, and get a new racquet. If you decide to start off with a non-strung racquet that's up in the $50+ range, I don't think that'd be a bad idea also but I would make sure you aren't going to hate the sport or get tired of it right away.
     
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  11. chrisx

    chrisx New User

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    I haven't been too impressed with the pre-strung racquets I've seen in stores lately. They seem too big, many of them super-oversize. I think it is best to have a low powered mid-plus or oversize. Not too light. They should be able to take a moderate swing and not hit it over the fence.

    I hit with an really old Wilson Prestrung oversize, and found that it could hit quite nicely. I was a poor player when I was playing with poor racquets. I've found that if I revisit my old, cheap racquets, it is amazing what they can do!
     
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  12. Santoro071

    Santoro071 New User

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    I'd have to agree. I walked through the tennis aisle at my local sports authourity for kicks the other day and was amazed at the amount of 115"+ sq. in. racquets that weighed 9 oz. It looked like that was the only type of racquet they sold.
     
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