Best items you found at thrift stores (Goodwill)?

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by flashfire276, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    Do I see KNQ and HIQ in the buttcap codes?????!!!!!
    That means st Vincent for sure....!!!

    Kaching.........
     
  2. MarrratSafin

    MarrratSafin Hall of Fame

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    Epicness.

    10 chars
     
  3. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    The one on the left is either a 'JHQ' or 'JNQ', but the connecting bar in the middle of the letter is no longer visible. The frame is bumpered.

    These are my second and third SV85. I bought the first one about 20 years ago from PIAS and believed then that I was done with my chase for cool racquets (little did I know how premature that assumption was, and how much worse the condition was going to get). I didn't even know at the time that there was a way to tell apart Chicago and SV models via the codes. It's only in recent years that I learned the significance of the 'JWQ' lettering on the butt cap of that frame.

    What I find interesting is that even though 'W' comes after either 'H' or 'N', my old 'JWQ' is bumperless, while the newly acquired JH(N)Q is bumpered. The code sequence must not have progressed on a purely alphabetical basis.

    Looking through the archives here, I found at least one instance where someone had a 'JNQ' that was bumperless; so perhaps mine is a 'JHQ'? Or the switch occurred in the middle of the 'JNQ' lot? Or maybe mine was refitted with a later type grommet strip by the previous owner? The latter seems unlikely however, given the overall lack of wear on the frame (some of the recessed areas were literally covered in moth cocoons).

    Regardless, I've probably exhausted my thrifting mojo for a while...
     
  4. Bowtiesarecool

    Bowtiesarecool Rookie

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    Last edited: Sep 18, 2012
  5. Bowtiesarecool

    Bowtiesarecool Rookie

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  6. texacali

    texacali Rookie

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    I own one of those and the WB 210. Actually liked hitting with the 210 more. Picked up my 215 at a pro shop in the mid-90's, probably at the end of the WB life line. Maybe $20-$25. Surprised that on bid site, folks are asking about $40.00 for these rackets.


     
  7. Slim Pickens

    Slim Pickens New User

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    Picked up a Wilson Sting 110 with original leather grip and a Pro Kennex Graphite Saber 30 also with original leather for $5.00. Both are in 9.5+ condition with what looks to be factory original string. The PK Saber has one of the thinnest beams I have ever seen!!!
     
  8. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I used to string at least one Saber A DAY for a fellow pro at a private club in Atlanta ! The guy was an absolute animal, just off the tour. The worn area destroyed in the middle of the strings was only very slightly larger than the ball. I told him if he spread out his hitting zone a bit, the strings might last more than 6 hours! Not the best racket for string life anyway, but sheesh! :)
     
  9. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    I got so excited today! A Prince Graphite original for $1.99!

    Then I saw it. . .Cracked. :~ (
     
  10. jonestim

    jonestim Professional

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    I've had that twice in the last six weeks - both POGs. I have also found a Graphite Comp 110 that was worn badly into the graphite and a Spectrum Comp OS with the headguard cracked into many pieces. All racquets I would have loved if they weren't so darn abused.

    I've come up pretty dry for the last couple months but I did find a Pro Kennex Copper Ace 90 - the teal one with a red stripe - in a 8.5-9 condition for $5 that place quite nice.
     
  11. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    Not a lot out there in my area this time of year. This is the first POG I've found "in the wild".
     
  12. jonestim

    jonestim Professional

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    I found a 4 stripe mid last summer for $8 with original grip and grommets in good enough shape to restring a few times. Paint in about a 6.5-7 condition.

    This summer I found a Straight Shaft OS with no grip and demolished grommets for $2. The paint is in an 8 condition.

    I also picked up a Graphite Pro 110 which is a thinner beamed, softer version for $10 and a Graphite II OS for $12. Both of those were at our local version of a Play It Again. They have a Speedport Red that is going down to $12.50 on monday, but it is a grip size to small and I don't really need a more powerful racquet.
     
  13. Racquet Daddy

    Racquet Daddy Rookie

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    Here's a pic of the Silver Ace I grabbed a few weeks ago. Grip says L3, but it feels much bigger than 3/8. And today, behind some golf bags, I saw a racquet case and pulled out a Yonex RD-7. It looks like it's never been played with. I'm not a Yonex guy, so I looked up the specs - pretty sweet. Might swing it this week.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  14. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Nicely done. Our local GWs would price those quite a bit higher unless the strings were broken or some similar defect.

    The grip on the Silver Ace looks pretty round, as though it has been built up. Easy enough to check by removing(starting) the grip.

    I played the RD-7 for about a year...always felt too bulky...used the Cyborg for a while after that...still clubby, but you could murder groundies with either.
     
  15. jonestim

    jonestim Professional

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    Our Goodwill prices just about every racquet at $8, whether or not it is in good shape. Cracked grommets and headguard - $8. POG with a crack big enough to have the side caving in - $8. Perfect - $8. Pefect with case - $12. There is more variability at the smaller shops in town where they can be $2-12.

    I don't think any shop around here would have priced that at $2.99. Great find.
     
  16. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    That sounds about right. Unfortunately, at least one G-w here stickers the covers as well as the rackets. 50/50 chance that the register person will sell the proper set for the one price. Took me a while one day to convince the cashier that a 200G cover with a busted zipper wasn't worth the same price as the racket!
     
  17. Sarcastic

    Sarcastic New User

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    Pdp

    I bought three PDP Fiberstaffs that were NOS ,never strung, hang tags still on them and each has a cover. Two of the zippers don't work. Beautiful with no scratches, still have them.
     
  18. khw72004

    khw72004 Semi-Pro

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    Great find. The RD-7 is a solid racket. I have had two before and gave them to one of my best friends because he tried it out and fell in love with it.
     
  19. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    Your Goodwill prices are higher than I'm used to. The highest I've seen is $6.25, with the vast majority of racquets $2.99-$4.25.
     
  20. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    Tell me if you ever want to trade that Copper Ace. It is one that I had back in the day, and I've been wanting to try it again. I have lots of classic graphite trade bait.
    Edited: Sorry, I forgot about the "no trade" rule in this forum.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
  21. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    Watch out for TW's Tiffani..........!!!!!!
    No trading or selling in this section!!
     
  22. jonestim

    jonestim Professional

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    Which is why folks should have their accounts set to "Receive Email from Other Members"
     
  23. Long Face

    Long Face Rookie

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    The best item I found in a thrift store is a Wilson T2000 at $4.99:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  24. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    Yes, they should.
     
  25. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    I've only been exposed to two types of DuraFiber racquets prior to today: the orange "Lite", of which I picked up a pristine example a few months ago, and the black "XT".

    With a name like "DuraFiber", one would have thought that the brand was created specifically to market racquets made out of a tenacious fibrous substrate, so I was quite surprised to come upon this well-worn stick in a pile of unremarkable Dunlops and Heads today (shown above its "Lite" cousin for dimensional reference):

    [​IMG]


    While this frame is not made out of any kind of fiber, the material is in fact a 'dura' according to a decal affixed to the side of the shaft - 'Duraluminum' to be exact, an old-school aircraft alloy that's actually a good deal stronger than the 6000 series alloy used in most contemporary aluminum racquets.

    There are no legible markings other than the aforementioned decal, a serial number, and the logo on the butt cap, so I have no way of knowing what the actual model designation was. I am guessing that this was the low-end offering of the series, but the alloy frame is significantly stiffer than the buttery soft "Lite", and has a tinier but more solid-feeling sweet spot compared to the one found on the latter. This particular unit had seen plenty of hard use in its day; which suggests it had reliably served its previous owner(s). I am particularly intrigued by the onboard crucifix (or is that an anti-aircraft sighting device?); I suppose the cavity could have been covered by a logo at one point, but this is weirder looking, hence better :). Regardless, I don't expect to ever run into this unusual beast again in my neck of the woods, unless it is actually more common than I think it is?
     
  26. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    Yes, it's a Dur Aluminum and the Durafiber logo was situated in the now empty cavity.
    Made by Acro in the USA, according to an Arco patent, around 1978.

    (Source: Book of Tennis rackets by Kuebler)
     
  27. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    Thanks for the confirmation, Hans!

    Yes, if I had the Kuebler book, I suspect I would have no more reason to post here, as the vast majority of my questions can probably be answered by simply looking through that book.

    However, this is one monumentally expensive book! Both the original '95 edition and the 2000 English language edition (I think you have both?) are worth more than what I had paid for my entire rag tag collection of discards. Until I chance upon a copy at a significant discount, I think I am going let the mysteries fester indefinitely, while continuing to siphon knowledge from guys like you whenever necessary :) ...
     
  28. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    Yes, I got both the 1995 English edition and limited and signed 2010 Update. It did set me back a hefty 200.00 euro all together. But it's worth it, I believe anyway.
     
  29. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Wow, it's too early in the week to process; but, I'm remembering this aluminum frame. Possibly a 7000 series alu like the Head Pro or PDP Open. Seems PENN marketed a similar model(I might be dreaming) and had a logo sticker covering the 'gunsight' throat brace. A butt-cap logo sticker would fit there just right, I believe. Frames like that were destined to fail, I reckon, because the throat piece had the stress of 6 or more mainstrings pulling straight up(while the Head rackets had the mains run through the frame for significant increased strength). The Wilson World Class suffered the same fate. In the hands of a hard hitter, the throat could be pulled out of place in short order.

    Of course, the super-thin throat brace in the composite DuraFibers was a potential failing point. I have the Lite and the XR-Graphite, both with intact throats...but neither appears to have much 'court time'. I remember seeing my first DuraFiber in the South Carolina heat(in the '70s) and the throat bridge had simply 'melted' and failed.
     
  30. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Coach is very correct as usual.
    These rackets were beautiful if strung and played at low tension, like 40 lbs with victor imperial. I had a few such strung models and they played extremely flexible, like slingshots.

    Take a look at a few of the offerings:

    http://woodtennis.com/durafiber/duraFibers1.jpg
     
  31. chrischris

    chrischris Hall of Fame

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    I found a PDP Fibergraph for 8 bucks in 9.0 condition last fall..and a few years ago a Head Competition that was blue and silver and was probably the European version of the racket.4.95.
     
  32. BlueB

    BlueB Hall of Fame

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    Thrift stores and used sports goods stores... Prices ranging from 5 to 20.
    Left to right:
    Dunlop Max 200G J.Mac sig, hardly a scratch to it;
    Prince Spectrum Comp 90 (came with original leadther, I replaced it with lightweight overgrips only);
    POG 90 4-stripe (they were twins, one given away to my hitting partner) came with original suede bag;
    Prince Boron 110, close to mint condition;
    Queen Elizabeth's personal racquet (susspected, bears insignia)

    [​IMG]
     
  33. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    That is a nice haul!^
     
  34. pshulam

    pshulam Hall of Fame

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    Nice find! Are they stored in your garage?
     
  35. BlueB

    BlueB Hall of Fame

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    No, I sleep with them ;) :D
     
  36. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    NOS Black Max. It was wedged between two golf bags. I never imagined that I would be finding this at Goodwill.

    [​IMG]
     
  37. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Wow, that's something you might expect to find in Greenville, SC, not Richmond. Based on the cover graphics, it's one of the later models. Well done!!!
     
  38. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    Thanks. I think Richmond is a crossroads of sorts. I have found a number of the original owner tags in racquet cases, and they have been from Minnesota, Oregon, California, everywhere but Virginia.

    Why SC?
     
  39. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    The US home office of Dunlop Sports was(is?) in Greenville, SC. Just down I-85, across the Georgia line, is Hartwell--where the tennis balls were made for years and the distribution of the tennis products took place.

    I would imagine there are a few closets and garages still housing some NOS rackets in both cities. ;)
     
  40. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    I learn something new every day here.

    This is my third favorite "pick" from this store, the first being an immaculate 200G and the second being a cherry Rossignol GW-200
     
  41. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I would imagine some store room in Van Buren, Maine to be 'home' to multiple Cragin/Garcia and Rossignol wood sticks. It's a darned small town, but maybe some TT member lives near there? OR, perhaps they used the old wood rackets as firewood in a particularly cold winter season ;) . Same would apply to Williston/S. Burlington, VT, where Rossi headquarters was situated('70s-'80s). I would imagine there are some skis and tennis rackets stashed away SOMEwhere around there.

    "We" don't have the vast history in composite racket manufacturing like our Euro friends; but, I can imagine some stockpiles of Head, Wilson, Dunlop, Davis(may have been 'discovered' already) or even Spalding frames are behind some locked door...collecting dust...waiting to be discovered :) .
     
  42. jonestim

    jonestim Professional

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    I went to Van Buren to visit that factory back in '95 after they had started producing bicycles instead and were then under the name Aegis Bicycles. Very small town. When we asked at the gas station how to get to the factory we were told to head down half a mile and turn left at the barn that burned this morning.

    History of the factory here: http://aegisbicycles.com/about.html
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2012
  43. daveyboy

    daveyboy Rookie

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    I live in Maine, but no where is near Van Buren. Its 6 hours from Portland, Maine's biggest city. I would like to see the area and the Aegis plant someday, though, to see where all the old frames were produced.
     
  44. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    As I recall, it was an all-day trip to get there from Burlington. The last two legs of the trip were on 'Scare' New England (as Air New England was known then) and Bar Harbor Airlines...with the final bit a drive up from Presque Isle. Back then, it was easy to drive across into Canada for a meal and back within an hour or so.
     
  45. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    I just saw a listing on the German bay, (160908302273), were this alloy Durafiber/ACRO racket
    is being auctioned off but this version is a Rossignol "The Touch" (Made in the USA).
    They did have many frames made in the USA so it just might be the same frame, different name.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  46. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    Thanks for the heads-up, Hans! Yes, that Rossignol frame seems to be a very close match to the Durafiber I picked up. However, I noticed that it has a denser string pattern (16x20) than that of the DF (16x18 ). This is not a stringer artifact - I counted 64 grommets on the Rossignol, whereas the DF only has 58. My guess is that these two frames are likely fraternal twins rather than exact clones.

    Incidentally, I came across another PS85 this week at one of my fishing spots. This one is really worn (though not broken), and I was going to pass on it due to the condition. However, when I lifted the stringer sticker on the butt cap, I could vaguely make out the letters "JWB". I didn't have my reading glasses with me to clearly see the 'B', but those tiny and widely spaced letters are distinct enough from the later iterations that I knew instantly - thanks to what I had learned on this board - that this is a Couvin frame.

    [​IMG]


    The semi-glossy paint, the single sticker with the moderate tension range - everything is just as others had previously described regarding this model. However, I've also noticed that my Couvin frame has a significantly more rounded contour than the sharply chiseled look of the later models. This is especially obvious around the PWS bumps. If this characteristic is unique to the Couvin frames, then it would indicate that Wilson didn't simply ship the molds from Couvin to Chicago when they switched production sites, but that they had in fact made a new mold for the Chicago frame that incorporated small adjustments.
     
  47. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    ^ Fascinating! (Perhaps as an engineer,) I really appreciate the attention to detail 'Sanglier' takes in his (her?) posts in our little forum here. Thanks for taking the time and effort to document what I find to be a very interesting little detail! :)
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  48. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    Thanks, Retro! I only became a racquetholic and thrifting addict in the past year. My visits here allow me to learn from those who are similarly afflicted, and share what I have with the community. I've tried very hard to convince myself that as long as I am sharing (even if only virtually), I would not cross the dreaded threshold of becoming a hoarder - because as I see it, a hoarder is an extremely indiscriminate and imprudent collector who is pathologically averse to sharing...

    As for my gender, I think it's quite clear that only men (with the possible exception of Virginia?) are predisposed to develop such fascination for the history and architecture of discarded sports equipment. :)
     
  49. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    You are absolutely right, I had noticed this "deviation" also.
    According to Michel Guilluy, a Donnay historian and good friend, Couvin was a proving ground to develop the braided graphite production process.
    They could not have chosen a worst site since Donnay had absolutely no clue how to deal with modern materials such as graphite etc.
    They were behind in this technology for they had only produced wooden rackets so far but since Donnay and Wilson had been involved in previous years, Donnay produced many wooden frames for Wilson, they figured it would be a nice hidden place to try this out.
    The PS 85 moulds did stay behind in Couvin and at a later stage Donnay used them to make the Pro Cynetic range with the same braided graphite/kevlar mix as the PS 85 but without the PWS. If you compare your Belgium PS 85 with a Pro Cynetic 1 you will be astound by the similar moulding marks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  50. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    I believe the drill pattern on the first-generation Donnay Pro Cynetic frames (there was a later range called Pro Cynetic which came out of a completely different mould) was a bit different, with eight mains going through the throat bridge. There was also a Graphite Borg model from this mould, IIRC.
     

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