Best Technique for PS88

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by asifallasleep, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. asifallasleep

    asifallasleep Professional

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    My favorite racquet is the PS88, my most used racquet K90. Arm gets tired with the PS88. Yesterday I decided to play on and inside the baseline hitting all my shots on the rise. The PS88 was fantastic. When setting up farther behind the baseline I typically exert a lot of energy on forehand with the PS88 to really crush the ball. This typically leads to fatigue because of the weight of the racquet.

    Standing on and inside the baseline, utilizing a short smooth compact swing hitting on the rise, the frame was amazing. The weight and stability of the PS88 is perfect for short compact strokes hitting on the rise and you don't have to exert a lot of energy; and the ball still rockets with a lot of pace.

    I may have to start playing matches with it to see if this energy saving technique allows my arm to hold up over a long match.
     
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  2. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    That aggressive approach, if you can always pull it off, will always save you energy and generally shorten matches where you have the initiative. That's the Federer style vs say, Djokovic, where you stay behind the baseline had blast away on groundstrokes. I think that this was partially why Federer was fresher at the end of the year than Djokovic, Murray and Nadal.

    The downside is if your opponents can consistently hit deep to the corners because you will have to scramble behind you to get to those balls.

    I played more of a behind the baseline game with the KPS88 and my current racquet is quite similar to the KPS88. I generally don't play inside the baseline - I will pounce on a short ball and I do serve and volley from time to time.

    A guy that I play a lot started doing what you're talking about when playing against me last year and it was and is effective, at least until I developed counter-moves. Yesterday I returned a serve to my backhand to around the middle of the court and moderately deep. He ran around his backhand and hit an angled ball deep to the corner and I returned this a little short so he hit a very sharply angled (and hard) shot to my backhand and I had to move wide off the court to reach it. He was way over to the backhand side when he hit this shot and came in behind it. Some of these shots are outright winners but the natural thing to do if you get it back is to slice it down the middle which is why coming in behind it is so effective.

    Instead I just hit a soft slice to his forehand corner which he couldn't reach because of his momentum coming to the net and where he was coming from. I have seen YouTube videos on how Djokovic counters Federer's inside the baseline and favoring the forehand and it is similar, hit it to the corner instead of going back crosscourt or down the middle.

    My approach on heavy racquets is to improve fitness - then you can play whatever game you want to. There are a lot of advantages to playing efficiently but you will eventually run into someone that can hit the corners where you may have to play back behind the baseline.
     
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  3. Cavaleer

    Cavaleer Semi-Pro

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    "That's the Federer style vs say, Djokovic, where you stay behind the baseline had blast away on groundstrokes. I think that this was partially why Federer was fresher at the end of the year than Djokovic, Murray and Nadal."

    Astute observation. Fed's style in general is very effortless, I'd say the most effortless in the history of the game. I think this is why he's had such great longevity and few injuries.

    To the original post, I'd say hit the gym and get stronger, top to bottom. Then you'll be able to swing out all day long with the 88, inside the baseline, S&V, or grooving behind the baseline. It's a big boy stick, so add some muscle and swing like a big boy. :)
     
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  4. roundiesee

    roundiesee Hall of Fame

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    For me, the most important thing to execute when using the KPS88 is early racket preparation; this racket is very unforgiving when hitting "late" on any shot :(
     
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  5. seekay

    seekay Semi-Pro

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    Seconding this. Turning your shoulders and bringing the racquet back earlier will give you more time to swing. I find that when I'm lazy with my preparation, my arm has to work a lot harder to try and get the racquet around in time.

    The KPS88 is a fantastic racquet for identifying shortcomings in technique. If it hurts, that's often a sign that you could be doing better.
     
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  6. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    #6
  7. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Wait, so the OP is considering changing his technique to suit his racquet? Shouldn't it be the other way around?
     
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  8. thug the bunny

    thug the bunny Professional

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    I don't think there's a prob with honing technique to fit a more demanding racket. Same with using blade irons in golf, they 'force' you to swing properly to make pure ball contact.
     
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  9. Cup8489

    Cup8489 Legend

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    #9
  10. El Diablo

    El Diablo Hall of Fame

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    Prepare early -- preferably yesterday.
     
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  11. UCSF2012

    UCSF2012 Hall of Fame

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    One thing about the KPS is that you have to swing away just to get the ball over the net. Any half swing dumps the ball into the net. KPS is all power all the time. Very little finesse shots.
     
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  12. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    That's assuming the benefits of such a racquet outweigh the risks of altering one's technique to suit that racquet. It depends how much you're changing your game. Everyone makes little adjustments, but to adopt new technique seems like a stretch.
     
    #12
  13. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    Sometimes it does but you lose a lot of matches in the transition. I went through that with the K90. I could not keep the ball in the court with it so I went from an Eastern to a SW. My game improved in the long run but I lost matches in the short run.
     
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  14. Cavaleer

    Cavaleer Semi-Pro

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    Very, very good points.
     
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  15. morten

    morten Hall of Fame

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    Try ps85, IMO easier to use than both K90 and 88. Also easier on the arm... low tension works wonders for me on this frame btw, 43lbs, x1. ;)
     
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  16. mxmx

    mxmx Semi-Pro

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    I second the idea of maybe a lower tension on strings. I get the impression that smaller heads tend to translate into firmer tension, even if it is strung the same on a larger head.
    You can also try hitting more through the ball, instead of hitting over the ball. Slightly less spin in other words. In this way you can gain another form of power. I had to do this when i played with my kblade...had to totally adjust my technique to suit the racket. The racket actually forced me to improve my technique...which maybe is what this racket will do for you as well
     
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  17. jtrain_36

    jtrain_36 Rookie

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    I'm just getting ready to use a kpro staff this coming spring and will have to keep this in mind. I've always preferred playing slightly behind the baseline, but I hope to develop more of an all-court game.
     
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  18. Fedchamp

    Fedchamp Semi-Pro

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    + another, and really keep your eye on the ball. But it's just too heavy for me. I can only use it for about a set.
     
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