Best tennis camp for 4.0/4.5 25 year old that wants to go pro

Discussion in 'Tennis Travel' started by lovethetriangle, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    I bet someone he knows finally told him that he was just too old (since he still had a full time job) to realistically achieve his goal. And maybe explained how good those guys really are and how, even at Philippines standards, how much they committed to getting to the level they are.

    This thread backs one of my thoughts - most people who follow tennis really don't understand that once you get to the elite level, the margins are razor thin. The big 4 don't have any magically level of hand-eye coordination- their talent is in bringing their practice court game into the big stadiums and winning the important points.
     
    #51
  2. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    Some have faster reactions and better timing taking the ball on the rise, better touch, etc. They all seem to have different strengths.
     
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  3. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    ^^^^ No problem. We can agree to disagree. I've watched lower ranked guys at the practice courts hit with the top guys - go to 3 or 4 ATP events a year. If you didn't know who was who - and the fans weren't screaming and the top guy didn't have an entourage - you wouldn't know who was Top 10 and who was 50+. Then they go play their matches and... it's obvious who can hit shots under pressure and who can't.
     
    #53
  4. Hnefi

    Hnefi Semi-Pro

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    This is true. I have been up close and personal with a few ATP events and the most recent PanAm games in Toronto. Lots of the players going deep into the singles draw there were outside of the top 500 and looked like absolute world beaters. Although the event was eventually won by a guy who has gone 2 rounds deep in a Slam before, he almost lost the first round to a teenager with no ranking, in a legitimately contested match.

    Tennis is more of a game of inches than anything I've ever played in my life.
     
    #54
  5. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    Like in many things, it's the last incremental bits of improvement at the highest levels that are hardest to achieve.

    It's probably hard for amateurs to see the subtle differences but if you ask the top 30-80 ranked guys what is like to hit with/play points/practice against a top 3 or 4 guy they will tell you there is a very noticeable difference to them.

    For example the world class 100 meter runners struggle to improve their times by even a 0.1 or 0.2 seconds.


     
    #55
  6. DUROC

    DUROC Professional

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    Moved on to meth or Oxy
     
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  7. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    No on your tennis example. The top guys play the big points better; don't cough up UEs. Has nothing to do with eyesight/reflexes/stroke quality. It's handing the pressure.

    And your track example is a total straw man. Track, sprints in particular, are separated by physical capabilities - #80 in the 100m isn't as fast as Bolt. Even if you gave him a flyer out of the starting blocks Bolt would run him down.
     
    #57
  8. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    Like you, I have also watched the pros play and practice up close.

    I agree there is the mental aspect, which is huge factor, but there are sometimes more subtle things as well.

    For example, Edberg didn't have powerful groundstrokes, but he had amazing footwork, quickness, reflexes at the net. He close the net faster than anyone I've ever seen.

    Fed has amazing touch.

    Djokovic's flexibility allows him to hit driving groundstrokes on shots that others may only be able barely get back with a defensive shot.

    McEnroe of course had amazing touch as well.

    Raonic has a monster serve. Fernando Gonzalez had a huge forehand.

    Raonic. Serve.

    These strokes/weapons/skills that make them stand out from the pack. Add in the mental part and if the cards play out you might get a grand slam champion.

     
    Last edited: May 30, 2016
    #58
  9. atatu

    atatu Hall of Fame

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    The original poster was Treat Huey for all you naysayers !

    JK
     
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  10. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    Still, no. There are guys with 'monster' FH's and serves right now - toiling on the Futures/Challenger tours with almost 0% chance of being a top pro. Because when they do get the chance to play a match that could move them up in the rankings.... they can't do it.

    @atatu, :)
     
    #60
  11. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    I've only watched a few futures & Challengers level tournaments live, but from what I saw, most of futures level players were a bit lower on some level (strokes/movement/mental).

    Have you see guys in the futures tournaments with forehands and serves as big as Raonic & Gonzales? Were they able to get them in a good percent of the time?

    Do you remember their names? I'm curious to see them play.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2016
    #61
  12. Chotobaka

    Chotobaka Hall of Fame

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    Impressive that he turned pro in the same year as his original post and played Davis Cup the next year. That must have been some camp.
     
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