Best Value Stringer

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Will Wilson, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. Will Wilson

    Will Wilson Rookie

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    I am currently stringing on a Gamma 5003 standup model. I am now going to purchase my own stringer and have some questions.

    First, are table top models as accurate as equivalent stand up models? I think I will have to purchase a table top model due to lack of space.

    Second, there are some very inexpensive models out there (Klippermate for example); I am wondering if they are accurate, rotate 360, etc.

    Lastly, does anybody have any suggestions for a table top model for less than $500 given what I have stated above.

    Thanks
     
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  2. EastAngels2014

    EastAngels2014 Rookie

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    I have the same questions, great thread! :)
     
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  3. Andyroo10567

    Andyroo10567 Professional

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    I think a Alpha Pioneer DC plus would be ideal. Has 6 point mounting, fixed clamps, linear gripper, and a dropweight. Tension should be accurate since its a constant pull rather than a crank tensioner. How come you are not going to use the Gamma? It looks like a very good machine. Otherwise, goodluck on searching for a stringer.
     
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  4. Will Wilson

    Will Wilson Rookie

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    I am curious between drop weight and crank tensioners. Any thoughts?
     
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  5. Andyroo10567

    Andyroo10567 Professional

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    There should be a thread about Constant pull vs Lockout. I.E , Drop Weight/Electric vs Crank.
     
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  6. COPEY

    COPEY Hall of Fame

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    Here you go.
     
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  7. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Have you ever watched a stringer in a big box store string a racket? They sure are quich with those electronic machines. I watched the worst stringer I have ever seen at a big box the other day. Pulled first two right mains at first and I thought this guy is insane. Then he clamped both at the top of the frame. My opinion of his (certified MRT) skills went in the toilet. Then he double pulled two mains on the left and and clamped 2LM and did it again and clamped 4LM. Switched to the right and double pulled four strings. I could take any more and walked away.

    All his pulls were from the top of the racket and the clamps were moved so quick he set the clamp right when the machine went beep. I am sure he strung rackets well under 15 minutes.

    Let's talk about only what the little beep means. The electronic tensioner pulls until the target tension is reached and beeps to signal the string the tension has been reached. If you clamp the string immediately there is no constant pull, just a pull - clamp. If you are going to use the tools like that how can it be any better than a lockout?
     
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  8. Will Wilson

    Will Wilson Rookie

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    Thanks much for this. Very helpful. Sounds like dropweights are kind of fussy, especially after using a lockout. Can anyone give me some feedback on how much slower a dropweight is compared to a crank / lockout?
     
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  9. COPEY

    COPEY Hall of Fame

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    My recommendation is that you don't think in terms of slower/faster since speed is predicated mostly on how efficient you are with your technique and movement. Many consider a dropweight more tedious, labor intensive, and that's what eats up time by in large. Your situation is a little different than a lot of people who don't own a machine in that you're currently stringing racquets, and doing it on what is considered a fairly nice machine. My guess is you probably don't want to take a step backwards in terms of efficiency/convenience features, and in my opinion, that's what a dropweight would be.

    Since you have a budget of $500 your best bet is to scope out a used machine.
     
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  10. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Don't have any first hand knowledge with a drop weight but once your are good at it maybe 10 seconds per pull. String a 16x19 racket and that's about 6 minutes. A crank will take you about 3 seconds per pull so you will have about a 4 minute difference. If you pull twice with the crank the crank will take longer.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3aYI5DXQxSA
     
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  11. Will Wilson

    Will Wilson Rookie

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    Thanks again for the useful info. Having never used a dropweight I'm just a little nervous about not getting it correct and having to do the same string multiple times. Perhaps that is not a common occurrence, I don't know.

    I am looking at "automatic dropweights" as well. They are a lot more money but take that potential problem out of the question. One thing I like about the idea of a dropweight is the simplicity of it, lack of parts to break, etc.

    Please let me know how common it is to have to do the same string multiple times with a dropweight because of not ending up with the lever horizontal.
     
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  12. Peppershaker

    Peppershaker Rookie

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    I learned on a Gamma X-2 manual dropweight. Initially getting the bar horizontal did require multiple attempts; however, with some experience you reached the point where this was a rare occurrence.

    Now use a Stringway ML100 automatic drop-weight, and besides no such issues, the consistency and reliability of the machine is a joy to work with.

    Received a used Toas crank machine about a year ago, that was in good shape but needed some serious cleaning. Last night finally had the time to calibrate and test out the machine. Frankly can not see how turning and manipulating the crank would be any faster than my ML100. Was also surprised at how changing the speed of cranking varied the tension. Had always heard and read this, but have to now wonder about anyone stringing who isn't paying attention to this. Going to play around some more today, but I was seeing up to a 3-5 lb tension difference simply by how fast or slow I operated the crank.......is this usual?
     
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  13. Will Wilson

    Will Wilson Rookie

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    Thanks for the info, feel much better about buying a regular dropweight. I have used a crank / lockout for several years but didn't ever really test the tension difference based on the speed of turning the crank. It does seem like people really feel like a dropweight is more accurate / consistent.
     
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  14. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I absolutely love my Klippermate and even if I had occasion to buy another machine, probably would not do so. The Kmate does the trick for me, and does it very well.
     
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  15. COPEY

    COPEY Hall of Fame

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    It's a fair argument to say it's easier to be consistent with a dropweight where as with a crank you have to be extremely deliberate/consistent with how fast you're pulling. By in large it's the person doing the stringer rather than the machine that makes the difference. You can produce a very good string job with a Klipper. Converserly, you can really turn out a crap string job with TF-7000 ($5,900) - I've seen it first hand.

    For you, I just think going from a 5003 to a basic dropweight would take some getting used to...and I can't imagine you enjoying the process. Then again, it may not phase you in the least. Good luck!
     
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  16. v-verb

    v-verb Hall of Fame

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    Glad to read this - I just bought one a couple of weeks ago
     
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  17. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I haven an alpha string pal. I string a racquet in about 45 minutes, a bit slow but I'm still just a beginner at stringing. I've probably strung about 50 racquets so far. I take my time and am unconcerned with how quickly it gets done. I just put a movie on and grab a beer. It's relaxing, like zen, you know?

    I string at least one racquet per week. I don't like old strings on my frames, so i cut strings out around the 10 hour mark.
     
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  18. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    Exactly true, great Egyptian god, my friend. . . I like stringing out of doors on a nice spring day, just watching stuff around me and breathing fresh air. If I wanted to make a living stringing, I'd have to go with a faster machine.
     
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