best way to measure tension for a newb?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by eunjam, Oct 12, 2006.

  1. eunjam

    eunjam Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2006
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    i just started stringing on a drop weight with fixed clamps and i want to measure tension.

    what is the best way?

    a) get a tension meter (i.e. fishscale like device), ensure that drop weight is accurate as possible, then just continue stringing as consistent as possible?

    b) get one of those stringbed meters like this one (i.e. http://...."aayyy-teeee-sss-sports.com/tennis.cfm?...7&secondary=12)

    c) get one of those ERT 700's to measure stringbed?

    d) any combination of the above

    i am just a home stringer for myself, yet i do want to be precise.

    basically i want to see how well i am/am not doing.

    any advice from you would be greatly appreciated.
     
    #1
  2. ryohazuki222

    ryohazuki222 Semi-Pro

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    or...

    e) go out and play with the racket and see how you like it...

    from what i've read on these forums, there really isnt that great of a way to measure it post-stringing

    ... btw... your post might be deleted since you posted a link to a competitors site....
     
    #2
  3. Valjean

    Valjean Hall of Fame

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    Get a Stringmeter; that's fine to start with. When it's for just you, use it to record the tension each time your racquet is done, the fresh results you get with various string compositions, and to track tension loss over time, too. Your standard will be comparative that way, and less confusing to draw on. Other inexpensive portable devices like the ERT 700, which can give a dynamic reading which takes resiliency into account and lets you crosscheck the Stringmeter's string tension record, are useful too, but should be added in later.
     
    #3
  4. andrew_b

    andrew_b Rookie

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    Use a stringmeter, but don't get hung up on the numbers matching any sort of tension. use it as a reference two ways:

    1) see if each time you string at the same reference (set) tension, you get the same reading from your stringmeter when you take the frame off the stringer (this checks consistency), and,

    2) use it to see how quickly your strings lose tension (this allows you to compare string types, etc, and to know when you want to restring).

    Other than that, I think the next stps is a device that measures stringbed deflection. Good ones are not cheap.

    play well,
    Andrew

    edit: note that in #1, different string type and guage may vary the number, so you'll want to check using the same string if you're interested in seeing how consistent you are.
     
    #4
  5. SW Stringer

    SW Stringer Semi-Pro

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    To accurately check the tension on your stringbed, download the freqmess program from Marc Roettig's website: http://marc.roettig.org/tennis/freqmess.php

    It only requires a PC and a microphone, is quite simple to use, and is free.:p
     
    #5
  6. jonolau

    jonolau Legend

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    When I first started out stringing, I was almost obssessed with post-stringing tension. I bought a String Tension Tester to measure tension. But after stringing a couple of frames, you get the hang of it very quickly and will not even bother to use the STT.

    I would be more concerned about the calibration of the the stringing machine, rather than the stringbed. However, in the case of a dropweight, there is no need to buy a calibrator as it works on gravity and a fixed weight. You will only need to calibrate a crank or electric stringer.

    So, don't get too caught up about post-stringing tension. Instead, spend your effort to improve on consistency in tensioning the strings, weaving the crosses efficiently, and tying proper knots.
     
    #6
  7. andrew_b

    andrew_b Rookie

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    I agree, and I hope that is what came across in my previous post. Use the stringmeter to see how consistent you are, remembering the impact string guage and type can have.

    play well,
    Andrew
     
    #7

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