Best way to reduce movement in mains?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by akamc, May 11, 2012.

  1. akamc

    akamc New User

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    I have been experimenting with lower tensions using synthetic guts and multi-filaments. The overall stringbed hits fine, but the movement in the mains quickly introduces more variability and reduces the amount of control. Movement in crosses is not so much an issue due to notching of the mains which "locks in" the crosses.

    What would be the best way to reduce movement in the mains?
    1) Increase the relative tension in the mains?
    2) or increase the relative tension in the crosses?
    I have seen stringers argue it either way. Would it make any difference, and what would be your reasoning?

    Also, are there any other simple suggestions (Jet method maybe? I don't really want to mess with poly strings or stringsavers), and what would be your rationale?
     
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  2. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    Strings move. Period. There is no way around it. And ,NO, the jet method will not help.
     
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  3. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    A lot of it will depend on how low you are going with tension, which is something you didn't mention. Certain strings move a lot, and some don't move much at normal tension range (typically 52-62). For instance, Prince Synthetic Gut is notorious for movement, no matter what tension. Wilson NXT is somewhere in the middle. Prince Premier Attack and RIP Control only move occassionally. I'm assuming 16 gauge on all of them since 17 breaks too quickly for me. There are a few play testing threads on the Strings forum that mention movement in their reviews.
     
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  4. akamc

    akamc New User

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    Drakulie, I realize that. A hybrid with poly crosses slides back even at low tension, but I aim for a softer stringbed nowadays. Also, it's a drag to keep having to restring because the poly goes dead or because the multi or syngut breaks.

    Ramon, you are right of course. Different strings behave differently. For me, with synguts the mains always notch and break first while the crosses never do. With multis, crosses typically fray and break first.

    I'm using mostly 17 gauge now (sometimes 16) and I typically string in the low 50s now (50-58) depending on the string and string pattern. Currently, I am using Gosen OG Micro as a baseline to reduce the variables.

    My basic question was, for a given overall stringbed firmness that you like, is it relatively more effective to raise tension on the mains or the crosses to minimize movement on the mains, and is there a mechanical basis for that ? Or does it make no difference ? I'd like to know what the consensus among experienced stringers is on that.
     
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  5. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    Again, unfortunately, it isn't going to make a difference. Strings are going to move. Only way to minimize movment is to hit totally flat, and have a low swing speed.
     
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  6. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    If you read through TWU's articles on spin and strings, they explain the theory that certain strings increase spin because they snap back into place. According to their theory, setups that minimize friction will maximize spin because the mains will slide. This would lead you to believe that you might want looser crosses so the mains would slide more easily.

    While I think that theory might hold true for poly setups, my experience with multifilaments has been the opposite. My current multi, Prince Premier Attack, moves very little compared to other multifilaments. One day I noticed wear on a certain intersection so I inserted a Babolat Elastocross string saver at the intersection. I noticed the string was moving a lot near the spot where I inserted the string saver. Apparently, friction is what holds PPA into place, and I do notice that a tighter stringbed generally results in less movement for multifilaments. Multifilaments don't seem to have the snap back feature of fresh poly strings, so they need friction to stay in place. I notice that dead poly doesn't snap back either.
     
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  7. KerryR

    KerryR Rookie

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    What about using string savers? Wouldn't those stop the mains from moving; isn't that how they 'save' strings? My understanding is that some folks say they somehow increase spin (probably) through added texture and therefore ball grip, while others say it reduces spin by limiting the deflection and snap back of the mains...
     
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  8. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    The string savers I have experience with are the Babolat Elastocross. They do not lock the strings into place, they just reduce the friction between strings so they don't wear each other down. I don't notice a difference in spin. Like I said in my previous post, it actually made my multifilament strings move more. If you have a string that snaps back, like a fresh poly, maybe it would help keep it straight, but I never used it with poly mains.

    One string pattern I used that seems to help a little bit with the outer mains is a one-piece pattern using cross strings as tie-off strings. You need to reserve an extra foot or two on the short side. It's like a traditional one-piece except you would use the short side to string one or two crosses and then tie it off. Then you would finish off the rest of the crosses with the long side. This method requires a 3rd clamp, which could be either a starting clamp or a flying clamp. When you do it this way, all of the mains are at true tension, so now you don't have any loose mains that move around more than usual. I got that idea from another tennis forum. Of course, it does nothing to reduce movement with the majority of main strings.
     
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  9. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    How about poly mains and gut crosses? Should be easy on your arm and poly almost never moves.

    Any soft string in the mains is going to move. As mentioned above string savers might help hold the string in place somewhat.
     
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  10. KerryR

    KerryR Rookie

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    Ooops. dublicate post... delete. :)
     
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