Bill Tilden career accomplishments-a comparison with Federer

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by pc1, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    I totally agree with you on those youtube highlight threads. It doesn't prove anything. The backhand as you as nicely wrote works with the game he has. It's solid and he can on occasional hit winners with it, sometimes a lot of winners but he uses it more to set up his awesome forehand.
     
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  2. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    Nathaniel,

    I didn't notice this post until now. Brilliant post. How true.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
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  3. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    They did win the '27 Series, but you're asking for 1920s tennis players to be accorded the same respect as baseball teams from the same period get from baseball fans. Very reasonable request but some tennis fans just seem to find it outrageous.

    Strange, too, because both Ruth and Tilden were swinging wood instruments. Not sure why Ruth should be seen as a greater master of his craft than Tilden and Cochet and Lacoste were in their sport.
     
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  4. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    One big difference is that we all hit with larger racquets of different materials and different strings. As a person who started playing with wood racquets I can tell you that it's very easy to adapt to a larger head that's lighter and provides more power and spin. The same with the strings.

    I would think Bill Tilden would adapt very easily to the racquets of today and I believe Federer would be able to adapt to the wood racquets of the 1920's.

    I mentioned this in some thread but in baseball many High Schools and College play with aluminum bats which are lighter and provide far more power. The major league scouts draft some of these players and judge whether they can adapt to WOODEN BATS. Many of these young players don't succeed because they can only play with aluminum bats and don't have the swing to hit with wood bats.

    My point is that it's really in my opinion not hard to adapt to better equipment. I don't see why it would be so hard for many of the players of the past to adapt to today's different techniques of playing as some have implied.
     
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  5. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Thanks for this interesting thread PC1. I like the focus on a great player of the past. Here's a good short article on Big Bill Tilden.

    http://sports.jrank.org/pages/4861/Tilden-Bill-Tilden-s-Legacy.html

     
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  6. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    That's really interesting, PC1. If young baseball players can't make the major leagues because they can't adapt to wood, then why are we always hearing that it's unfair to ask how modern tennis players might adapt to wooden tennis racquets?

    In baseball the mere use of a wooden instrument is not disrespected, because the major leagues are using it. It's what the pros are using, so it gets automatic respect.

    And that was the situation while the best tennis players -- the pros -- were using wooden sticks.

    But nowadays it's common to hear that those tennis players, from the wood era, were merely playing pitty-pat with the ball -- that they were playing a child's game that would be overwhelmed by the much greater game today.

    Something's not right here, because those tennis players from the wood era were, in their time, regarded as masters of their craft, no less so than the best baseball players. And yet some modern tennis fans speak as if tennis has really moved light years ahead in skill and is now a real man's game compared to the pitty-pat that they used to play in the old days.

    I'll ask again, is there any reason to think that Babe Ruth was a significantly greater master of his craft than Bill Tilden was of his? If not, then roughly speaking Tilden, as a tennis player, should be accorded as much respect as Ruth gets in baseball.

    I'm not saying that Ruth and Tilden must be as great as today's players, or that these sports have not progressed. I'm just wondering whether fans of both sports are all willing to give both men, roughly speaking, the same amount of respect for their skills.

    Ruth still gets respect for the great distance of his homers (among many other things), yet it's still common to caricature Tilden and any other player of his era as playing pitty-pat with the ball.
     
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  7. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    Agreed. Here's an article from USA Today that I first saw when Borg Number One set up a link for it.
    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/tennis/2007-06-20-raquet-tech_N.htm

    Here's a link for wood bats versus aluminum bats in baseball and how it affects performance. It gives the baseball scouts opinions.

    http://www.newclassroom.com/batspaper.htm

    Another article on how they weakened aluminum bats to make it play like wood bats.

    http://www.yankeeanalysts.com/2011/...-in-college-baseball-mean-for-prospects-28809

    Yes it's too bad that some think that players even not too long ago played pitty pat tennis. I've seen some remarks even about Laver that people thought he was a soft hitter.
     
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  8. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    Bill Tilden's great wins and losses--Federer's great wins and losses

    1920-Tilden defeats Patterson in the Wimbledon final 2-6 6-3 6-2 6-4. Tilden's first Wimbledon over the defending champion
    1921-Tilden defeats Shimizu in Davis Cup 5-7 4-6 7-5 6-2 6-1. Tilden had a boil on his right foot. A doctor came after the third set and lanced the boil and Tilden won the last three sets.
    1925-Tilden defeats Lacoste 3-6 10-12 8-6 7-5 6-2 in Davis Cup. Tilden trailed two sets to none and 4-0 in the third before pulling it out.
    1927-Lacoste defeats Tilden in US Final 11-9 6-3 11-9. Tilden had set point in the first set, led 3-1 in the second and 5-2 with two set points in the third set before losing to the machine like Lacoste. Despite the straight sets victory by Lacoste it was considered one of the finest matches in the history of the tournament.
    1927-Cochet defeats Tilden in the Wimbledon semi 2-6 4-6 7-5 6-4 6-3. Tilden led two sets to none and 5-1 in the third before the amazing Cochet won 17 straight points to pull out the set and won the last two sets for the match. Cochet went on to win Wimbledon against Borotra after also losing the first two sets and surviving several match points.

    2003-Federer defeats Mark Philippoussis 7-6 6-2 7-6 for his first Wimbledon title.
    2004-Federer defeats Hewitt 6-0 7-6 6-0 for his first US Open. Amazing shotmaking. Hewitt was just overwhelmed by the Federer movement and power.
    2007-Federer defeats Nadal 7–6(9–7), 4–6, 7–6(7–3), 2–6, 6–2 in the Wimbledon final. Always a great win when Federer defeats his nemesis Nadal.
    2008-Nadal defeats Federer 6-1 6-3 6-0 in the 2008 French Open final. Nadal was just unstoppable.
    2008-Nadal defeat Federer 6-4 6-4 7-6(7-5) 7-6(10-eight) 9-7 in the Wimbledon final. Federer rallies from two sets down to tie and finally take the lead in the final set only to lose just before the onset of darkness. Some consider this to be the finest match ever played.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
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  9. JorgeLobo

    JorgeLobo New User

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    "But his contributions to the game of tennis can not be discounted because of such personal indiscretions. Almost single-handedly he transformed the game of tennis from one that was considered an effete pastime, to a national obsession that filled stadiums and brought to the game an entire new generation not only of spectators, but also of players anxious to best Tilden and his records. Instrumental in transforming the elitist amateur game of tennis into the modern professional, open-era game, Tilden will be long remembered as one of the greats of the sport. As tennis writer Allison Danzig wrote in The Fireside Book of Tennis, Tilden "was the master of his time and for all time."

    Child molesting is alot more than "personal indiscretion." Those praising Tilden should not forget that tennis is entertainment - what is the level of success that excuses child molesting?
     
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  10. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    It's a horrible thing of course but we're focusing just on the tennis aspect. There is no excuse for what happened with Tilden.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
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  11. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    I have both Tilden and Fed in my top-5 all time.
     
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  12. kiki

    kiki Banned

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    If Laver is generally considered the guy by which all modern players have been seized, Tilden played the same role for pre open era players.
     
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  13. mental midget

    mental midget Professional

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    i think somebody woulda figured it out eventually.
     
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  14. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    Bill Tilden story from Fred Perry

    Fred Perry in his book wrote that one of his (Perry's) ruses was to hit the ball (in those days the ball was white) and move his body behind it making it tough for his opponent to pick up the ball against the background of his white shirt. The only player who noticed this was Bill Tilden. Tilden apparently told Perry in Omaha that he (Tilden) had gone to an optician because he was bothered with his eyesight recently, particularly indoors as the ball seemed somewhat hazy. The optician told Tilden he had perfect eyesight. Tilden looked Perry straight in the eyes and said "You know something, Fred? When you come into the net you move in behind the ball so I don't get a clear picture of what I'm looking at." Perry wrote that Tilden never missed a trick.
     
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