Bizarre Foot Fault Ending to District/State Championship Match

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by BustedString, Aug 16, 2010.

  1. BustedString

    BustedString Rookie

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    I was at our State/District (they are the same) Championship this weekend. Most of the matches were played indoors at a fantastic collegiate facility with tons of bleachers elevated above the courts.

    The match in question involved one of my best friends and it was the #3 doubles court for 4.5 women Both teams were undefeated and the winner of the team match then qualifies for Sectionals in Indianapolis. The team match was tied at 2-2 with my friend's team sweeping the singles and the other team taking #1/#2 doubles.

    Towards the end, there were at least 50 people watching this match with both teams watching, several spectators for my friend and another team from our area waiting to go on court. It was a great match with my friend and her partner wining the 1st set 7-6 but then the other team took the 2nd set 2-6.

    We play a 10-point TB in lieu of a 3rd set at these championships. Two refs came over to officiate during the match TB. It was a see-saw affair with my friend/her partner going up a mini-break several times only to lose it. At 9-8 for my friend, her partner hit what should have been a winner but the other team got it back and benefited from a let cord. It soon became 10-9 for the other team and on their MP, the other team had an overhead that my friend flailed at and unbelievably got a racquet on, the ball ran along the top of the net and dribbled over. The other team got there but had to pop it up because of the low bounce and my friend's partner crushed an overhead.

    My friend won the next point so it was back to match point for them, 11-10. The other team was serving. The first serve was a fault into the net. The second serve was in but even before it bounced, one of the officials called a foot fault. The match was over. I've never seen anything like that in USTA league tennis. It was so weird, so anti-climatic. The foot faulter was seen sobbing afterwards. One of the other players on the losing team body checked a player on the winning team in the locker room. It was very contentious.

    People have disagreed about calling the first foot fault of the match at 10-9 in the TB. I guess, like Serena, if it happened the ref had to call it. If the ball is out, it is called. If the foot is out of bounds, it must be called too. Weird, weird, ending for such a big match.
     
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  2. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    Was that the first foot-fault call of the match (as far as you know)?

    Did you notice the foot fault (in other words, was it pretty blatant)?

    Did all balls manage to remain "un-throated"?
     
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  3. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    It is a bit strange and a little sad considering that most USTA matches are not played under the full attention of an official. I'm sure players would be much more conscious of footfaults of an offical calls it a few times. It's much harder to have that same level of officiating when you have to make your own calls, and the other player many not respect your footfault call.

    But rules are rules. I'd have to commend the official for at least having the guts to make a call when he/she saw the rules being broken. I'm sure people have had stories of playing a chronic foot-faulter or cheater and the officials haven't done jack.

    I feel kind of sorry for the person who got called on match point, and it may have felt more fair and more even if there was an official watching over the whole match instead of just the tie break.

    Just wondering, did you see the footfault? Was it noticeably egregious?

    The body check after the mach was uncalled for though. It's not the player's fault. Why not body check the official and see how far that gets them?
     
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  4. BustedString

    BustedString Rookie

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    It was the first foot fault call of the match. One of the two officials later told another official (friend of mine) that she had called one earlier in the match but she hadn't so she must have been thinking of another court. My friend agrees that it was the first foot fault call of the match.

    I couldn't see a foot fault on that point because I was behind the server on an angled bleacher behind safety bars. She had served on the other side of the court in the 1st set and I thought she was foot faulting a tiny bit then. Once she got into the 2nd set and TB, she never had an approach volley because she was on the net so fast. My belief is that she did do the FF but man it was an awkward situation.

    Except for the body check in the locker room, involving players on the same team but not that court, there was no shoving anything down anybody's throat ;)
     
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  5. BustedString

    BustedString Rookie

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    I saw her foot fault, just a tiny bit, earlier in the match when she served against the side on which I sat. I couldn't see it on that side.

    The two officials both confirmed that they saw a foot fault so there's super strong chance that it was a foot fault.

    Come to think of it, I've never seen two officials work the same court either. There were 18 courts and 4 officials so that was odd.
     
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  6. tennislefty

    tennislefty New User

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    while it seems tacky from the ref for the timing of the call, i cant imagine the pain! getting to post season is whatt USTA is all about,,id be crying too.
    p.s...i am crying!
     
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  7. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    It's a bummer, but sounds like an open and shut case of a footfault.
     
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  8. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    Last edited: Aug 16, 2010
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  9. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    There is a difference between this situation and Serena Williams. In Serena's case, there are people watching every serve of every match she plays. She should be cognizant of FFs on every shot, and if she FFs in a crucial spot late in the match, that's too bad.

    If these rec players played two entire sets in a playoff match without anyone watching or calling FFs, then have linespeople start watching just in the tb, and then not have a FF call until a second serve at 10-11 in that tb, that's pretty weak, IMO.
     
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  10. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    It's tough to make the argument as you could apply that reasoning to any situation where the official might have to step in to call an infraction.

    For example: what if there was a shot that landed close to the line on match point. A player may have given a benefit of a doubt, but if an official has a clear view and can CLEARLY call it out, then they are supposed to keep quiet because they didn't officiate the whole match?

    I agree that having an offical step in late in the match is not ideal by any means, but the player is responsible for making sure they are playing within the rules and the officals should enforce the rules.
     
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  11. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I have one question.

    I believe roving officials aren't supposed to focus on one court unduly. In other words, they are supposed to rove, not take a position on one team's baseline. That would be unfair because there aren't officials on all of the lines. True, Woodrow?

    If that is correct, then I don't think the FF call is fair. Even if there are six officials and this is the last match, I would think they should treat it like every other match -- they should rove. Or more precisely, one should be available to supervise the match and the rest should go drink some water. There should have been one official supervising that court, not two (or more).

    Unless the FF was huge and visible from the official's position at the net post, then I don't think it should have been called. Warn, yes. And then call it.

    I'm probably wrong, I know. I just can't feel good about this outcome.

    Cindy -- who can't imagine such poor sportsmanship that would result in any sort of physical altercation in the locker room, especially among so-called "ladies"
     
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  12. Angle Queen

    Angle Queen Professional

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    Congratulations on making it to States/Districts...and having such a wonderful facility to play in.

    We had to play outdoors in 100F+ heat. Bah!

    Same here. 10-pt TB...AND officials come over to watch it. Not unusual and much appreciated, IMHO.

    Can't say I've seen it at MP...but at some crucial times in a match. What was even weirder...was that, sometimes, they'd just "call it" and move it. Literally. And not even watch the next serve. Other times they'd hang around until, inevitably, the server would lose it...and their service game.

    Anti-climatic indeed.

    THAT would be me if it had happened to me. Totally understandable.

    Totally inappropriate and uncalled for.

    Wow. What a crazy match...and a crazy way to make it to Sectionals. But, again, congratulations. That's a huge accomplishment, no matter how it happens.

    Good story, BTW. I enjoyed your description a lot. :)
     
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  13. Spokewench

    Spokewench Semi-Pro

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    I played at Sectionals this year and one of my matches happened to get started later and we were the last people on the court. The official came over and watched the last part of the second set and the tiebreak. He was nice, but he basically left us to call balls and left us to make any decisions that we had to make. In other words, he did not butt in as we were have an amicable game
     
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  14. woodrow1029

    woodrow1029 Guest

    That should NEVER happen.
     
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  15. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    I wish they had gone at each other and torn each other's clothes off
     
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  16. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Aw, come on. You guys had a great season. You won the county, you won Districts. You're not going to Nationals. All of the teams were strong; it's always a crap shoot. What does it matter, really?

    We're the same age. We have a very finite amount of time left on this planet, and if we are lucky we can spend a fair amount of that time playing the sport we love. We'll win some, we'll lose some. If you did your best and tried your hardest, then that's plenty good enough.

    : offers tennislefty a Costco sized box of tissue :

    Feel better? Good. Let's play some seniors in January, shall we? :)
     
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  17. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    I will report that Ref to USTA and he will be fired soon. You don't call footfault in amateur tennis.
     
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  18. Z-Man

    Z-Man Professional

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    That's crazy. The people running those tournaments are just state association employees and local league coordinators. They aren't professional refs and they aren't supposed to actively call matches--they are just there to run the draws and settle disputes.

    That said, footfaulting is rampant and it drives me crazy. I'd like to see something done about this in recreational tennis in general, but matchpoint is not the time.
     
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  19. tennislefty

    tennislefty New User

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    yea..guess after the letdown is finally leaving and you have to put it that we have a finite time left to do what we love that can be kind of depressing. post season is more than just your game, its the team thing.
    ive kind of run out of energy trying to get there! so many variables and the odds of advancing are slim. Got the bubble busted finally..thought id be the best 3.5 out there after a good local season, sectionals was a whole nother ball game! was harder than some 4.0 matches. our captains were the best! they always did what was right for the team, no favorites, no one was special. they really cared about the players and never put themselves first.
    my only wish is i dont move up so i can go again!
    Seniors??? me?
     
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  20. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Seniors? Heck yeah. We're both eligible in 2011, remember?

    Yeah, it's a team thing. There can be a sense of having let down the team. But really, tennis is an individual sport.

    Did you play your best? Did you prepare your best? Did you play every point all out? Then you didn't let down the team, even if you didn't win your individual matches.

    Yes, it does take a tremendous amount of emotional energy to pursue nationals every year. I haven't done it, so I can only imagine what it would be like. I imagine that it would be fun, in its own way. Then again, while others have been playing Districts and Sectionals etc., I've been playing 7.5 mixed. Just as challenging, but without the emotional wringer.

    Anyway, I'll see you on the court. Ladies day league fall play -- I can't wait!
     
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  21. Fugazi

    Fugazi Professional

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    Yeah that's similar to Serena Williams at the US Open... IMO one should be given a chance on his/her first foot fault of the match. So if there's a foot fault on match point, it would be called, and the server would have another shot at it. Thus it would be the equivalent of a let. This rule could apply either to both serves or only to the second serve...
     
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  22. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    It's not even "late in the match", it's a 2nd serve at 10-11 in a match tiebreaker. The pros are one thing, but in rec, you hate to see a roving official decide a match like that. And, again, it's different than a line call. Lines are called on every point of every match at the rec level, so there is an expectation that line calls will be made on every point. That is definitely not the case on foot fautls.
     
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  23. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy Rookie

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    I'm a captain in Michigan and we just got back from States.

    I did not see one, not one, foot fault called all weekend. The refs actually didn't seem to by paying much attention to anything while on the court. I asked a simple question to one of them during a match and the ref seemed confused.

    I'm convinced they don't have a clue what is going on, if they're not making calls consistently they have no right to make them at all.
     
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  24. BustedString

    BustedString Rookie

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    Both of the on-court officials are certified USTA Referee's and Umpires and have maintained those certification for many years.
     
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  25. 10ACE

    10ACE Professional

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    Really? At the us open wild card tourneys there were chair ref- service line, and in the back court- 3-4 on the 2 main courts.

    Sucks about the FF- I was called once 30-40 and lost that game. Ref was on us bad so odd.
     
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  26. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    I reported this matter to USTA headquarters and they said they will fire this Ref. Footfault in amateur tennis should not affect the course or outcome of the match.
     
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  27. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    I was informed that the ref has already been executed by firing squad.
     
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  28. Panic492

    Panic492 Rookie

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    I 100% agree. There is no prize money at stake and where where these officials the rest of the match to call foot faults? This is really outrageous.
     
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  29. TourTenor

    TourTenor Professional

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    They should look the other way when you footfault, ehhh Fedace? If they aren't calling footfaults maybe you can make it in to the service line before you hit the serve?

    Rules are rules and it is a good thing that there are no gray areas for foot faulting. Otherwise, there would be nothing but arguments over what is fair.
     
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  30. aceX

    aceX Hall of Fame

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    Anti-climatic indeed. But I don't like it that people play down the importance of the foot fault rule. It's not nice that it's match point, but it sounds like a clear fault.
     
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  31. Z-Man

    Z-Man Professional

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    I've been to state many, many times over the years. I've never seen a referee on the court calling a match. I've seen them called over a few times to resolve tricky lets or disputes about the score, but they haven't called lines or footfaults. I'm sure each state is different, but around here, calling footfaults is well outside the responsibilities of the people running state tournaments and sectionals.

    They might be certified Refs, but they still had no business getting involved in a match. Being a USTA certified Ref doesn't qualify them to call footfaults from the stands at the US Open either. If they had been called over by one team complaining about footfaults or line calls it would be a completely different matter.
     
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  32. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    So call it the whole match. Do you honestly think this person's first foot fault just coincidentally happened on a 2nd serve at match point in a super tiebreaker to decide the whole match? There's a point where logic and decency supercede rules. At the very least, give the person a warning. I don't care if it's not in the code, it's easy enough to say after the point or at a switch "you foot faulted and if you do it again, I will call it" rather than deciding the outcome on the basis of a play that's been allowed for the whole match and that the person assuredly would not have done if there weren't an expectation that it would be let go just like the first 200 times in the match.
     
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  33. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    sucks for her team that the server doesn't know how to keep her foot behind the service line while serving. To add, the fact she is a 4.5 ntrp player.
     
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  34. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    Foot fault is a foot fault at any competitive level--sorry, but foot faulter deserves to lose the point (no matter what point in the match it was). If the server was truly a 4.5, then the player should be doubly embarrassed.
     
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  35. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    When someone says "foot fault is a foot fault" or "rules are rules" they're offering a slogan in place of making a case for their point of view.

    I'll admit that no one can really "prove" their own point of view, but I think common sense dictates that you don't call a foot fault on the second serve at match point, unless the foot fault was really outrageous. People want to play tennis, not for officials to take over in order to satisfy some tennis "god" in the sky.
     
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  36. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    scenario 1:
    OK, so I am the server in this situation, and hit my first serve out. Knowing I am facing a match point and that foot faults really don't count in this situation, I blatantly cross the line and bomb another serve in for an ace.

    scenario 2:
    Since its match point, even if I hit my second serve out by 6 inches, it should be played as in......... since it is match point of course, and "people want to play tennis".

    scenario 3:
    I foot fault, and serve is out, but being that it is match point, the ball is still live. Opponents return the serve, and teams go on to play a long rally. I hit the last shot out by 6 inches and no one gets their racquet on it. However, since it is match point, and "people want to play tennis", my team wins the point.

    scenario 4:
    scenario 5:
    scenario 6:
    scenario 7:
    scenario 8:
    scenario 9:
    scenario 10:
    infinity....................................

    Bottom Line is Rules are Rules, and are not there to apply at players convenience or leisure.

    Quite frankly, the server he should be embarassed that she:

    1. is a 4.5
    2. is playing in a sectional
    3. has two referees looking at her serve
    and still foot faulted on match point costing her team a win. Don't blame the rule, blame the player.
     
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  37. Winky

    Winky Guest

    I agree with this. Any ref who calls a foot fault on a match point, unless the foot fault is completely egregious, should NOT be reffing. ESPECIALLY when it's the first foot-fault called in the match?? That's just insane.

    I mean yeah if the person has his whole foot over the line or something, that's one thing, but I assume in high-level matches it's only going to be the toes or maybe the side of one foot if the server uses a pinpoint stance. There is no reason that should be called unless it's been called consistently though the match.
     
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  38. mutantducky

    mutantducky Semi-Pro

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    Agreed JRB,Z-Man, etc
    maybe not the whole story was told but going from the first post.
    As someone who refs sports and gets paid quite well for it there are times when you let infractions go and this was clearly one of them. Those officials needed to stay the F$CK out of that match. Pure power tripping and sticking their nose in where it does not belong. Boredom as well. How about giving a warning or if it is so minor as not to be noticed just ignoring and letting the players DECIDE THE MATCH. If there had been warnings or foot faults called then yes it is fine but if the officials suddenly decide to interfere at such a crucial stage then they are completely out of line. What Serena did after the foot fault was called was bad but it should have never been called in the first place.
    Take basketball, score tied, second remaining and there is a little hand check that could be called a foul but there is no advantage gained. Let it go.
    Take the recent golf incident when a player was penalized for some asinine reason.
    http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=5470940
    "Golf is the best game with the stupidest rules ever invented."

    So now people remember that instead of who won.
    I also will say that if I were the opponents in this case I'd say F$ off to the refs and let play continue. Maybe they were baffled by what happened but if I'm ever playing and a USTA wannabee clown calls something if they hadn't been asked to come over or give a warning them I'm saying F off and I hope my opponent ignores them as well. For those defending the foot fault call, would you really be willing to take a Trophy on say a 3 set hard-fought with integrity on both sides, but on match point a foot fault is called. If you say yes, then good luck with your sycophantic ways but leave the real sports to the players.
    And no one lost that match and NO One won it either.


    re
    that voice was good, nice link---
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnQp9YoLl68
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2010
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  39. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    I don't know what sports you ref but it ain't tennis. A foot-fault, is a foot-fault, is a foot-fault, no matter when it happens (or to who). In tennis, if an official calling the lines sees it and doesn't call it, they are cheating for the other side and not doing the job they are paid to do.

    Maybe that's how tennis and golf are different from other sports, in that those who choose to participate in them are held to higher standards than other sports.

    Serena was rightfully called for foot-faulting and what she said to that poor lines-person was outrageous and perhaps racist. I've never heard her apologize to the lines-person for verbally assaulting and physically threatening her. Instead her PR people spun it into the phony $92,000 promo campaign so they can probably write the fine off as a business expense.

    If you disagree, then I'd like to sell you a used car, that I just discovered it's transmission to be going bad yesterday--but I have no responsibility to inform you of it since it ran great the day before. Or cheat on your spouse and try explaining it was the first time and therefore does't count.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2010
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  40. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    That's a bunch of BS. In scenario 1, if someone runs up to the service line and smashes an ace on the second serve, of course it should be called. However, I'm going to go out on a limb and say that's not what happened. As for the rest of your scenarios, calling lines is simply not comparable to foot faults because the lines have been called the whole match. There is never any expectation in any match that out balls should be played as in. If foot faults weren't called until a second serve at match point in a super tiebreaker, clearly there is an expectation by the server that the serve she had been using the entire match would not suddenly be a season-ending foot fault. If she's foot faulting, start calling it from the start or at least from some point before it's going to cost her team its entire season.
     
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  41. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    "A foot fault is a foot fault is a foot fault", except, of course, when it's not a foot fault for the first 3 hours of the match. Was it a foot fault for the rest of the match? If so, then why wasn't it called? Why was it crucial to screw an entire team at match point if it wasn't important enough to call for the rest of the match?
     
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  42. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    As I understand it, the foot fault was not called because the roving refs weren't there for earlier parts of the match. If the foot fault is not called, then the receiving team was cheated or maybe because it is match point, they should be given an extra inch of "in" since the server was given an extra inch of no-fault room--any alternative to the right call yields a ridiculously unfair result. Competitive tennis has no place for "situational calls" that depend on what point in the match is taking place. No one was "screwed" by the call unless of course the call was wrong. A server has the obligation, particularly at match point, to make sure that he or she doesn't foot fault. If you don't think so, then please explain why the receiver shouldn't call a ball "in" that was an inch out on the same match point--I am not sure I understand the difference.
     
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  43. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    My point of view is in fact that the rules are meant to be followed--thought your more evolved "common sense" would lead you there. A further explanation is above. If people want to play tennis for "hits and giggles" that's fine but if, on the other hand, you want to play competitively in an organized tournament, you have an obligation to play by the rules---the "god" is actually not in the sky and the rules in this case are rather unambiguous. I guess in your example, the "god" would have to determine what is "really outrageous," rather than the simple black line test under the rules of tennis. In this case, the decision was made by an official, a presumably objective observer--seems very fair to me.
     
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  44. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy Rookie

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    You guys keep saying "a foot-fault is a foot-fault" but how is anyone supposed to know they are foot-faulting if the average player never has anyone around to call them.

    it's not like we get refs for more the half a dozen matches a year...i would say most players practice by playing with teammates and that's not even a good condition to call foot faults.

    with that said I don't think a ref can start calling foot faults on the last point of a match. Start calling them from the beginning so players can learn when they are doing it and adjust....then it's on the player and not on the ref.
     
    #44
  45. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    Oh, I see. It should only count when **YOU** decides what is wrong or right. We should just dismiss the ITF/USTA rules, and go by the J_R_B rule book. :roll:

    As for the rest of your bogus argument, the fact is, the refs showed up, when they showed up. Their job is to ensure the game is being played within the rules, and in this instance, they did thier job. Unfortunately for the serving team, the server was irresponsible and violated a rule. To add, she was probably doing it the entire match, so who knows how much of an advantage she was getting every time she served.
     
    #45
  46. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    Interesting. So, somone who has reached the 4.5 level needs someone else to tell them they are foot-faulting and "learn"??? At the 4.5 level, they have already done all the "learning" they need to learn about rules.
     
    #46
  47. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    so the ref waited til the last possible point ? ...sweeeeeettt!!! :twisted:
     
    #47
  48. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    If they have a pro they take lessons from regularly, that pro should be responsible for his student learning how not to foot fault.

    If the player is on a team, his captain should be responsible for observing his team members and pointing out that they are foot faulting. Unfortunatly, in league tennis, it's usually the blind leading the blind. The captain is not a pro or someone who has a deep knowledge of the sport of tennis. He's more of an administrator, who's main job is to e-mail his team where to play and when.

    I've sat on the sidelines, with league team captains, who were playoff bound and observed egregious foot faulting. I pointed it out to the captain. I told him he needs to fix that because it will come back to bite him. I told him his players will fall apart when they are called for it for the first time, under the pressure of a playoff match. I've been there and seen it happen. I'm sure my warning fell on deaf ears.

    Teams will often take lessons from the club pro and that is an excellent opportunity to deal with it. Club pros often travel to playoffs with teams and do prematch warmups and that would also be a good opportunity to deal with foot faulting.

    The USTA should hold clinics at tournaments to educate it's membership in the basic rules of tennis. It's amazing how many who have "played" for years are clueless to the sport's fundamental rules. No one reads those cards about the code they hand-out. Maybe USTA should produce videos about the rules that could be viewed at clubs or a copy mailed to each new member.

    The problem with tennis and the rules today is that the inmates are running the asylum. The club pros and Directors of Tennis are too busy administering to the few who take lessons from them to pay any attention to the rest of the club's membership. They are derelict in their duty to the sport that feeds them by not pointing out and enforcing the rules. They are either indifferent to their job or too afraid of offending their fragile member's sensibilities and lose a future opportunity to get into their wallets.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2010
    #48
  49. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Woodrow suggested there shouldn't have been a gaggle of officials around scrutinizing these four players. I suspect that if the officials had roved as they were supposed to, the FF call wouldn't have happened.

    These four players weren't officiated in the manner in which they should have been. That, IMHO, is the issue, not whether there was in fact a FF.

    I personally think the rules should be changed for roving official matches. The roving official should have to give one FF warning before they can call the FF on a particular player (with the effect of the warning to allow the server to repeat that serve).

    If there is a second violation, the FF call is appropriate, with it being a fault. If one official gives the warning in the first set, a different official can call the FF later in the match. The way this would be done is the second official can say "FF." The players will of course remember whether that player was previously warned, and they will know how to proceed from there.

    IMHO the current rules are unnecessarily drastic for matches involving league players and roving officials.
     
    #49
  50. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Well it happend, so it's obvious that a ref CAN call a footfault or any infraction at any point in the match, that's why they are there.

    Anyone who goes to districts or sectionals knows that they need to be more careful and brush up on the rules a bit, as they may not get away with anything that may fly in a match without officals. In fact, I've seen this seen warnings in the packets sent to captains that they should make their players aware that an offical may be observing their match.

    As for learning - do you mean it's okay to cheat unless you are called on it early in a match? So you can commit an infraction against the rules and continue to do it, unless it's called "early in the match"? There's no "match point exception" in the code or the rules of tennis.
     
    #50

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