blurry digital camera

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by max, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I'm trying to use a Nikon digital camera, and every shot I take is blurred and blurry.

    Any suggestions? This is the first time I'm using this technology. Any help or tips are most appreciated.
     
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  2. TourTenor

    TourTenor Professional

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    Set it on Auto Focus??

    Although I have a different digital camera brand it sounds like you have the Nikon on manual focus (MF?). Make sure it is set to auto focus (AF?).
     
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  3. lethalfang

    lethalfang Professional

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    Two solutions:
    1) hold still, or
    2) use brighter lighting, such as a flash.

    Images are blurry because the objects are moving too much with respect to the exposure time. Exposure time is a function of how much light there is. The brighter it is, the shorter exposure time is needed. If it is dark, then the exposure time needs to be longer, and if the objects move within the exposure time, the image will come out blurry.

    This is the same regardless of film or digital camera.

    A camera with a larger lens needs only a short exposure time. Unfortunately, most amateur cameras have tiny lens.
     
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  4. jmsx521

    jmsx521 Hall of Fame

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    If you set your Flash to Auto, the camera will recognize when it should fire the flash to brighten up the scene, so there is no blur. The brighter the scene is, the faster the speed of the camera's shutter -- which means less chances for a blurry image.
     
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  5. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    Try a higher ISO.

    Or see if your camera isn't malfunctioning.
     
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  6. jmsx521

    jmsx521 Hall of Fame

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    As he mantioned, Max has never used a digital camera before, and I wouldn't suggest for him to learn what ISO is at this point. I suggest keep it on AUTO, but make sure the flash also is set on AUTO.
     
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  7. donnygg

    donnygg Rookie

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    Even when you use autofocus, most camera require you to depress the shuttle partially, wait for the image to focus, then fully depress to capture
     
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  8. esm

    esm Semi-Pro

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    1. try to have steady hands when taking shots
    2. invest in a tri-pod, especially for dark/night shots.
    3. look for anti-shock function if you have it
    4. read the manual and learn all the functions. it is normal if it take a long time to get used to all the functions, especially those "custom" ones (ie. iso, aperture, exposure, focus etc..)
     
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  9. eagle

    eagle Hall of Fame

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    Above recommendations plus it wouldn't hurt either to go online or buy a book on Photography 101.

    r,
    eagle
     
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  10. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    Thanks for the tips. I'll use the advice. I just need to take a couple of digital shots; this makes 35 mm photography look so simple and painless, I'll likely stick with film.
     
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  11. eagle

    eagle Hall of Fame

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    Hi max,

    Whether your take pix with film or digital, the comments above still apply.

    Thanks,
    eagle
     
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  12. TourTenor

    TourTenor Professional

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    Max,
    Once you get used to a some basics I think you will determine that digital "is simple and painless." It has been quite a few years since I shot 35 mm but I remember having to finish off a roll of film and then taking it in to be developed before seeing the results. That's expensive (film and time) and can be frustrating if you don't get the results you want. With digital you can shoot and view on the spot. Erase till you get it right. Now that, to me, "is simple and painless."
    Stick with the digital a little longer (use the manual as a reference) and I am sure you will say the same thing.:)
    TourTenor
     
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  13. richw76

    richw76 Rookie

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    I know have a canon elph which is great, but I used to have a Kodak and it would actually take the picture about 1-1.5 seconds after you pressed teh button so you and my subject had to stay still an extar tick or two or pistures would be very blurry.

    Also I brace my arms against my body or a table, rail, etc(if possible) and try to keep everything still, stop breathing during focus until a second after the shot.

    Good luck!
     
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  14. lethalfang

    lethalfang Professional

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    Definitely!
     
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