Bruce Levine, chief racquet advisor for TENNIS.com and TENNIS magazine says...

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Superman1272, Nov 12, 2009.

  1. Superman1272

    Superman1272 Rookie

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    I am under the impression that NG plays great all the way up until it breaks. What are your thoughts?


    Bruce Levine, chief racquet advisor for TENNIS.com and TENNIS magazine had the following to say in the latest "The Pro Shop" article on Tennis.com...

    Q. Are you saying it’s better to restring only when the string breaks?
    Bruce: No, you should restring often because the synthetic or polyester—and especially gut—will go dead long before the racquet’s demise.
     
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  2. Valjean

    Valjean Hall of Fame

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    10 characters.
     
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  3. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Superman

    Nat. gut does retain its tension and elasticity better than any other string on the market, and is very playable until it breaks, Polys are on the other end of the spectrum.You only have to ask a player that has used that string for a while, and they don't need anyone elses beliefs to say different.
    I guess if you read the comment made, it said "before the racquets demise",not the strings, and a racquet can last for decades, so the comment may be partially correct. It looks more like a politicians statement, as it is how you view the statement.
    Even though he is the chief advisor does not mean it is an accurate statement.After all do you believe everything that the President says?

    At the gss symposium last year these comments were given:
    (not my words, but given by the speaker at the presentation, and can be viewed on the gss web site under their pictures under the gss symposium 2008 ) :I believe that Tim Strawn wrote the article , Tim is one of the Wilson string team members and founder of the gss, and hosts the annual stringers symposium each year. This was the comments presented there:

    Why is natural gut special?
    Elongation... Nat. gut is more elastic between the tension range of 50-70 lbs. where most tennis racquets are strung. Therefore nat. gut will stretch further allowing the string to absorb more energy.
    Elasticity... What stretches must recover and the recovery rate of nat. gut is unmatched by any synthetic. Nat. gut is a product of nature, not man, and by design it will seek its origional state after it's stretched and upon release. Polyester is the exact opposite as it doesn't recover to its natural state.
    Tension Maintenance... As described above, nat. gut 's recovery rate is what sets it apart from all other strings. It will stretch and recover at a phenomenal rate and retain a higher % of the origional strung tension than any other string on the market.

    So given this, it is questionable why the comment said "and especially gut ". I guess there are enough people that would not agree with that comment at all even though he is Chief racquet advisor for Tennis dot com.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2009
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  4. Superman1272

    Superman1272 Rookie

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    @ jim e

    I agree 100%. I hope that it did not seem as if I didn't know anything about NG...

    There is so much that I DO know nothing about. I would hate to add tennis strings to the list :)

    I was just suprised to see someone "knowledgeable" say such a thing.
     
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  5. mlewis721

    mlewis721 Rookie

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    Tennis magazine has a long history of disseminating misinformation on strings. A few years back they published an article that included one particular tidbit that surprised even the USRSA: "You should always wait 24 hrs before playing with a new string job". The USRSA got enough phone calls from its membership that they contacted all the "experts" whose names were cited in the article. None of these experts had any recollection of ever having said anything of the sort.

    Over the years their articles about string and stringing have tended to always begin by suggesting that people don't know enough about string. "You spent 3 months demoing racquets and $250 on that new frame and told your stringer to put in whatever he has lying around?" The reason though that people don't know enough about string is that they subscribe to Tennis magazine.
     
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  6. samster

    samster Legend

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    Consider the source of information (Tennis Magazine), I am not surprised.
     
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  7. Fedace

    Fedace Banned

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    He is exactly right. this is especially true for Gut if you get it wet. and polys just go dead after 6-8 hours.
     
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  8. YULitle

    YULitle Hall of Fame

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    Sure, it will go dead long before the racquet's demise. I have issue with the word "especially." For obvious reasons it suggests that it has an increased rate of "go[ing] dead" than the other strings listed, which isn't true. A more accurate and informational way to put that would have been "even natural gut." Oh well...
     
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  9. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    He is exactly wrong! Yes polys will go dead, but not especially gut, thats just plain wrong. I should have guessed that you would agree, so to others here consider the source of Fedace.
     
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  10. raging

    raging Professional

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    players and stringers know deep down that nothing beats natural gut for feel and elasticity, hybrid stringing gives you a compromise and allows a bit more spin, durability. Poly lasts longer but goes dead faster BECAUSE IT LOSES ELASTICITY FASTER THAN GUT: Synthetic GUT is another compromise again.
    Everything else is BLARNEY!(BS; BOLLOCKS!)
     
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  11. jefferson

    jefferson Semi-Pro

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    Never tried NG. Always been curious, but not willing to spend the cheddars.
     
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  12. peli_kan

    peli_kan Rookie

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    And this is relevant how?

    I agree with Yulitle by the way, it'd make far more sense if the right type of emphasis were applied to natural gut in Levine's comment.
     
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  13. jefferson

    jefferson Semi-Pro

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    I can not comment on NG if I have never played with it or even strung with it. But when all else fails listen to Yulitle.
     
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  14. mutantducky

    mutantducky Semi-Pro

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    I don't know where this BS comes about polys going dead quick. I think that is the tennis snobs thinking that. Yeah they do go dead but I've used about 10 and everyone gave me 20 hours at least and often weeks of good hitting.
    I'm done using polys though.
     
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  15. coloskier

    coloskier Legend

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    I've got old wood rackets strung over 30 years ago with gut that still have only lost a few pounds of tension, so he is way off base.
     
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  16. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    he is probably just pissed that babolatVS is so damn expensive.
     
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  17. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    A little off topic, but....

    On Time Warner Cable, digital service, there is an on demand channel called "Sports skool". On one video, a well known US tennis player/leader gives advice on tennis equipment. In discussing poly he says something like, "years ago all we had was nylon and cat gut".

    Note that this is a video that could have been easily edited and corrected if anyone had noticed an error.

    It's interesting how little some famous tennis people know about strings.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
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  18. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    Well, just when you thought tennis magazine couldn't go any lower they somehow find a way. The publication defines the word I R R E L E V A N T.
     
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  19. TierOneSportsOfficial

    TierOneSportsOfficial New User

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    I do agree with this in part. Although polys are known for going dead after a short period of time, most "ploys" on the market are mostly not true "ploys" anymore. By adding additional chemicals to the polyester these co-polyster strings can nowadays maintain tension much longer and are less stiff compared to a true, pure polyester string.
     
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  20. parasailing

    parasailing Hall of Fame

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    Some much misinformation on natural gut. He hopes we string our racquets more often so the string manufacturers can make more money off of us.

    I am in agreement with the poster who mentioned newer generation of polys are addressing the issue with short lifespan of the string but still a work in progress.

    However, majority of polys still last only about 8 to 10 hours with the exception of a few strings. I know that when I hit with a freshly strung racquet, it feels great. After a certain number of hours, the elasticity on the poly is no longer there and it's time to cut them out.
     
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  21. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I've hit with my share of new generation co-polys. I've tried them in full bed and in hybrids as mains and crosses, etc. It's like my arm is on a timer. It starts beeping at the 3-5 hour mark.
     
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  22. Lefty78

    Lefty78 Professional

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    I've got an idea. Let's just drag up every useless old thread we can find...
     
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  23. BigT

    BigT Professional

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    And quote Fedace while we're at it....
     
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  24. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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  25. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    Try VS Tonic+ BallFeel 16G. Gut is really a good experience. If you play poly or poly hybrids. Try gut mains with a poly cross. Pick a poly that retains tension so it can keep up with the gut.
     
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  26. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    I'm guessing the guy found these threads in google searches and registered to respond, so I wouldnt give him too much grief.

    And I would not pay attention to tennis magazine.
     
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  27. ian2

    ian2 Semi-Pro

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    Brad Gilbert was joking.
     
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  28. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    Many people still call it 'cat gut' (violin strings and surgical thread too) and we still talk about 'albums' even though that referred to 78 RPM singles that were bound together like photo albums.8)
     
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  29. tguru

    tguru Rookie

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    I dealt with Bruce Levine many years ago in Ct. He's a Teaching Pro. Nothing more or less. Nuff said.
     
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