C10 pro finally arrived

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by matchmaker, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    Some of you know that I was expecting a C10 pro and I finally have it in my hands. This afternoon I did a brief hitting session with it.

    I must say I don't really have a WOW experience but it feels like a very nice racquet I could get used to over time.

    Things I had problems with: the grip shape. I would have never thought this but I find it difficult to adapt to the Volkl shape after playing with the Donnay Pro 1, which has a Wilson/Dunlop grip.

    The C10pro seems to have more than enough power so I think at leat a semiwestern grip would be needed to keep the balls in, so that is where I struggle with the more rectangular grip, which is fine for a continental grip but if you turn the racquet towards western it feels strange.

    I am also searching for a good string combo. I played with it as I bought it: strung with PSGD at what used to be 60 but after much time collecting dust it must have dropped a lot.

    I was thinking that maybe a poly would be nice on this frame. I am not a fan of polys but on this one it might be okay, to stiffen up the frame a little as the C10 is very flexible, some say it is a wet noodle, but I personally felt I could get used to its type of feedback.

    What do other C10 pro users string it with?
     
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  2. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    If you want to try a poly, start off with something like ALU or Pacific's PolyForce Xtreme. Xtreme is less money and holds tension better, but both give you a better feel than something like TiMo or PolyForce Original.
    I would also recommend a tension below midpoint, low 50s.

    I love poly in my C10s and have been stringing them that way for quite some time.
     
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  3. samster

    samster Legend

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    I agree with you. The grip shape of Volkl and Becker frames has given me problems as well. I don't ever feel like my palm is fully in contact with the Volkl grip on groundstrokes (I have a SW FH like yours). While some would say the grip is modifiable but modding can potentailly add weight or alter the balance. I guess if it really bothers you that much, you can have it professionally modified by **** without adding weight or alter the balance for a price. For me, the grip issue has prevented me from using Volkl/Becker sticks full time.

    I just used a Head Liquidmetal Radical MP the other day and I thought I would have similar problems with the Head grip shape (even more rectangular). To my surprise, the Head grip shape took me less time to adjust than I thought it would and was hitting my regular shots in about 1/2 hour.
     
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  4. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    Hey Professor!

    Nice to see you like the C10, it goes VERY well with poly's, the lower the power the better, i had great succes with Alu power, BB original and SPPP, i always strung them above mid tension, at 26 or 27, perfect to tame the flexibility of the frame but of course that's rather personal.
     
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  5. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    I hit some balls with the C10 pro today and it plays really plush but the problem is that I tend to overhit with it. There were many balls I know should have landed in but they just went out for un unidentifiable reason. Being a frequent tennis player you know when you hit in or out when you make contact with the ball. The strange thing with this frame is that I hit, feel and am sure that I hit a good ball and then see it go out. So I quickly went back to the Donnay Pro 1.

    Do any of the Volkl experts have any advice on how to play this frame. What grip are you guys using on it. If I play flat balls fly out as described or I would have to shorten my swing, which is not really a pleasing thought to me, I like to hit out. If I play with spin I also find it difficult to control the depth accurately. With the Pro 1 I have the impression I could put the ball on a dime. With the C10 pro I have the impression I can only vaguely place it.
     
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  6. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    mm - i had the same experience when switching from the T10V mid to the C10. had better results keeping the ball in when the C10 is strung at 58 (if my memory serves me)...anyway it was at the higher tension range. agree with ericsson on the strings...u want a low powered poly or multi like maybe Rip Control.

    give that one a shot and let us know how it works out.
     
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  7. samster

    samster Legend

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    I would consider putting poly in the crosses in your string setup. The poly will probably bring the tennis ball down that PSGD normally can't.

    If my elbow could tolerate poly, that's what I would do all the time. I can see the difference in almost every frame that I have used that poly on the crosses give you that type of control unattainable with other types of strings.
     
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  8. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    samster - why wouldn't u put poly in the mains? i thought that the mains contribute the majority (can't remember the %) to the playability, etc.
     
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  9. samster

    samster Legend

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    it's a comfort issue for me. i can barely handle poly in the crosses with natural gut mains. my arm will have some serious issues with poly in the mains.
     
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  10. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    I had that problem too at first, that's why i switched to my beloved Tour 10, but the thing is, it's really flexible frame and you need to string quite high to tame the power, for me this frame needs time to adjust, once that happens you starting to appreciate the frame and can hit some real mean balls.
    So bottom line, give it some time and you will be rewarded, on the other hand, stay with your Donnay :)
     
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  11. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    Sam, are you so weak? :mrgreen:
     
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  12. 10sNut

    10sNut Rookie

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    matchmaker

    With Volkls I started demoing one size down from what I'd normally use with a Wilson. Made the playtesting experience more productive and natural.
     
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  13. Ross K

    Ross K Legend

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    Can someone please tell me how much a g/condition, non-'fish net', yellow, C10 Pro from approx. 1995 is worth? What kind of prices do ppl pay?
     
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  14. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    Ross,

    I have a fishnet version that cost me about 60 usd. I don't know if that is of any help.

    Ericsson, Samster, Bad Call

    Thank you for all the advice. I am definitely going to try some polys in it. This frame is so plush in play that I am sure this won't hurt my arm. I will try to give the frame a bit of time. The power is surely there and the feel too.

    I worked a bit on the grip making it squarer.

    I will keep you guys posted.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2008
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  15. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    Just a few notes.

    I'd recommend you try Ektelon Power Play at 57 lbs. in your C-10. I just love the stuff. . . and it's cheap!

    The Volkl grip will take some getting used to. Odd the company still makes this shape. I find, though, that it's a help with my one-handed backhand: puts more surface out there for my grip. Not so good on serves, though: I share with you the transition from a Dunlop to a Volkl grip.

    I admire the flex of the C-10 greatly and find it helps me do things with the ball, various shots around the court, that I would be unable to do with a stiffer racquet. Some younger guys here dislike the tip being flexy, but it's just the way I like it; older frames were like this, and, with experience, you may find it useful.
     
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  16. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I've had a similar hot & cold experience between the C10 (hot) and the Donnay Pro One (cold) that's got me trying 16 ga. synthetic at higher tensions instead of my favorite 17 ga. to calm down my Volkls. Couldn't coax enough pop out of the stringbed of the Donnays, even with with livelier multi's, so I couldn't punch volleys really well or put enough zip on my serves with them.

    I definitely agree that the C10 has a vagueness to it compared with the Donnay when I want to swing out. I'm typically anti-poly, but samster and Rabbit actually have me considering trying the stuff in the crosses of one of my C10's. If I do, I'll let you know how it goes.
     
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  17. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    fuzz - what tension and multi did u use on the Donnay that yielded too low of power for u? i'm considering a Donnay MP for someone that doesn't quite have all the skill yet for the Tour 10 V mid. any thoughts here? thanks.
     
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  18. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    I am not Fuzz but I do use the Donnay MP strung with PSGD 16g at 58. I am not a particular fan of PSGD but it works well in this racquet. A poly would play to dead on it and with a crisp synthetic gut you don't lose any spin capacity in this frame.

    It is however a quite demanding frame, I wouldn't see it as a replacement or alternative to the VE mid, but rather as a whole different option. It plays better on groundies and still has good serve and volley abilities.
     
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  19. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    thanks. would u consider it more demanding than the T10 V mid? and since i believe u have hit with both, how do the 2 compare?
     
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  20. b mathis

    b mathis New User

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    volkl c10

    VS 17 team gut at 57/59 for me is the hot set up for power , feel , touch ,this
    frame needs a little help in the power dept and these strings do just that, Im
    a flat ball hitter so they last me a real long time !! must keep them in the best
    thermal bag money can buy ( heat protection) and load the bag up with desicant bags to suck up the moisture !!! everybody that tries my frames ,
    doesnt want to give them back . good luck ,lets hear some feed back .
     
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  21. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    No it's not more demanding. I find the VE 10 mid very demanding and very nice to play with. It is however very tension sensitive (I played them with a hybrid of poly mains and multifilament crosses at 58) and has a long but narrow sweet spot.

    The Donnay has a shorter but wider sweetspot. This is especially noticeable on inside out forehands with topspin.

    I'd say for a baseliner/all courter the Donnay would be it, for a serve/volleyer the VE mid would be it as it volleys perhaps just a tad better.

    Returns are better with the Donnay.

    On serves it would be difficult to say which is best. The VE for flat, hard serves. The Donnay may take away some mph but not that many and seems to offer a lot of consistency and more spin.

    Both frames do produce spin even with the 18X20 of the VE mid (when strung at high tension) but the VE hits rather a laser shot, whereas the Donnay hits a curve topspin.

    Both are good racquets and what is stated above is subjective. I loved the VE mid and played with it for a couple of months but when I picked the Donnay Pro 1 out of my bag it was quite obvious that my game was a lot better with it... so I stuck with the Pro 1.
     
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  22. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    thanks. i think i can safely recommend this one without sticking my neck out too far. :mrgreen:
     
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  23. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    One thing that is interesting about the Donnay Pro 1 is that it seems just such a universal, walk-down-the-memory lane for any advanced player having played during the 90's. So if you recommend it to a friend with that profile I believe you are not sticking your neck out too far.
     
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  24. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    Wise words Professor!
     
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  25. matchmaker

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    Thanks Cell Phone!:)
     
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  26. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    BTW, I am going to check your wise words. I moded the grip on the C10 pro. I thought I would do that before changing strings but as accuracy in depth is still lacking I am going with a full poly setup. A poly I have always liked is Wilson Enduro Pro, I will try it at 58. See how it goes.

    Cheers
     
    #26
  27. AlpineCadet

    AlpineCadet Hall of Fame

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    If anyone is interested, I have one in the FS section.
     
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  28. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    actually he's a 19 year old player that hasn't been playing but a short while. hits SW FH and 1HBH with improving consistency. he's been using a T10 V mid that i loaned and hits reasonably well with that one (better than the C10). however better footwork is needed and inexperience shows so i'm thinking that a somewhat more forgiving racquet would be in order.

    sorry to hijack this one...got sidetracked from the C10. any racquet suggestions?
     
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  29. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    I don't know if the Pro 1 is that much more forgiving, maybe a tad. You need good footwork for it IMO, but if you can play with a VE mid, why not?
     
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  30. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I had one of my 2nd hand Donnays come to me with a set of 17 ga. Tecnifibre Biphase at rather firm tension and that was certainly the best of the bunch that I tried. I put some LaserFibre Supernatural Phenom - also 17 ga. - in another one at 60 lbs. and that turned out to be a little soft for me, but that string has been a fantastic fit in my NXG mids.

    One other Donnay came to me strung with 16 ga. Gosen syn. gut on the firm side and I put that thing down in no more than two or three minutes after I tried it. Just lifeless.
     
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  31. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    Hmmm i'm curious, looks like a good set up for the C10, this is a racket that goes well with spinners and flat hitters but like i said it need some tension when you take big swings or you have to put a lot of topspin on the ball like Mantilla and Bruguera did when they used the C10.
    Jiri Novak strung his C10 quite high when he was on tour, i think near 29 kg with full alu.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2008
    #31
  32. halfvolley777

    halfvolley777 New User

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    C10 Pro setup!

    I have found that Gamma Asterisk Tour at 61-59 pounds plays great-at least for the first week! For what it's worth-and the newer C10 pro frames swing lighter than the yellow cosmetics...anyone else comment on this?
     
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  33. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Rookie

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    C10 - New Cosmetics

    Agreed, in my opinion, the swingweight is much lower for the new "black" C10 as compared to its predecessors. It is so different to me that it messes up my timing. It's going in the closet for now. Perhaps as I get older, I'll have some use for it.
     
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  34. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    Okay, time for an update.

    I have worked a little bit on the gripshape of the Volkl, without doing to important mods: actually I put 4 layers of duct tape on the 3 upper and the 3 lower bevels, which makes the grip squarer and is very easy to do and undo. I understood that many people put duct tape on the upper bevel but then you are changing the inclination of the other bevels. By doing it on all three upper and lower bevels, I keep the bevel shape, and I cut it off in a way it is even with the remaining not moded bevels, that is the ones on the sides.

    Still after this I found it hard to keep the ball in court.

    So next was changing the strings and tension. I put Wilson Enduro Pro 16g at 58 lbs. in it.

    The first times I went out to have a hit with it, generally I played with it for about 20 to 30 minutes before going back to the Donnay. The thing is if you are going to play a match you have to feel familiar with your racquet, if not you are going to lose a lot of points.

    In addition to that I still hadn't found a way to make it work for me. I was spraying balls, didn't feel I had pinpoint directional nor depth control.

    Moreover, I also felt slight twinges in my arm, which is a logical phenomenon when you play with a racquet you are not familiar with and maybe the strings were also a bit harsch on the arm, being freshly strung, at high tension and with a relatively stiff string.

    Today I was able to play with it for about one hour and a half, as it was just a casual training.

    To be continued in the following post.
     
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  35. matchmaker

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    So, today was the first time I felt I was clicking with the racquet. My forehands found their targets, and I was able to keep them in. I think the few times I hit with the racquet helped me to visualize the sweet spot and to think how I could incorporate it into my strokes. I feel I might take a little less backswing and probably have changed the launch angle, which had a good result. For me this racquet works on the FH using a semi-western and putting quite a lot of topspin on the ball.

    To compare with my usual Donnay: I tend to use a slightly more western grip on it and take probably even bigger cuts at the ball, the Donnay probably hits more moonball-like shots on certain occasions. Whereas the C 10 pro put tons of spin on the ball but with another, more horizontal than vertical trajectory to it.

    The FH is one of the essential aspects of the game of about anyone and also of mine. I play lefty so for me it is essential to be able to play good crosscourt FHs but it is just as important to be able to hit inside out FHs, if not the game becomes to predictable and the righthanded opponent will start to run around his BH because he knows you are never going to hit to the other side of the court.

    The C10 pro finally delivered for me on that point today. My opponent, though we were only training, ran into serious counterpunches when trying to open up the court... I could use high topspin on his BH and then launch a shot along the line out of the blue that had him mystified. The other interesting thing about the C10 pro is that the way I tend to use it masks very well where I am going to hit.

    To be continued the following post.
     
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  36. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    matchmaker - haven't hit with the fishnet version. the one i have is the model prior to the latest C10 at TW. anyway i think that Enduro string is on the harsh side. if it was me, i would cut it out before the arm rebels.

    as a side note, the young male player (that i posted earlier) opted for a MG Radical. had a hit with it briefly and found that it definitely ups the pace on the ball. nice racquet but a bit pricey.
     
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  37. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    Backhands then. This racquet is excellent on slices. One of the best ever in that department.

    I don't know why but I began to hit a 1HBH with this one. I can actually hit both a 1HBH and a 2HBH with very similar quality but with the Donnay for instance I was using a twohander of late. The C10 pro then again seems to swing very right on a onehander. I am still getting a little bit used to the racquet but the first results are not too bad at all.

    Volleys.
    I haven't practiced a lot on that point but I feel it must be a very good racquet for that. It is just a sort of first impression/gut feeling. There are racquets I like a lot but I know they are not good at volleying, and that is something I immediately feel. This one seems all right on volleys. Just have to train with it.

    Serves
    This is where I am most struggling also because a lack of practice with the racquet. I think this is what you most have to get used to with a new racquet. So I will only be able to have a fair judgment on that after more training.

    To be continued...
     
    #37
  38. matchmaker

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    Well today the Enduro felt as if it had settled in better and it did't feel very harsh any more. Whenever I feel the arm slightly starts to protest I take another racquet strung with syn gut. Now I was wondering how the racquet would play with a regular syn gut but at a high tension. May have to experiment with that. Has anyone tried that...
     
    #38
  39. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    the trick with the C10 is to let the racquet head do the work...muscling doesn't get it with this stick.
     
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  40. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    Well the VE mid is one of the lowest powered racquets available on the market. I wouldn't say it is underpowered as in that you couldn't hit a winner with it but it is definitely low on power so if someone starts playing something slightly more powerful such as the MG Radical he must feel some increased pace.

    Yes, it is a bit pricey. Why not have tried the LM Radical. They are virtually giving them away.
     
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  41. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    i've tried syn gut and poly. low powered poly mains work better for me...with syn gut crosses.
     
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  42. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    So something like a high toss a long swing in a smooth movement...
     
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  43. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    getting warm...
     
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  44. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    You read my mind. I was thinking about that today... It would feel slightly less harsh and also increase playability. What poly and what syn gut did you use?
     
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  45. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    BTW the combination you mention also works very well on the VE mid, I take you are still playing with it. Polys on those extremely long mains help to control the ball and especially to give it spin. Syn gut will be more forgiving and make it feel slightly broader as the VE mid is an very narrow racquet.
     
    #45
  46. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    i had some ashaway monogut that i wanted to use up so opted for that...save the good stuff for the main racquet ...T10 V mid. surprised at how nicely it played in the C10. think poly mains are the way to go as long as they are low powered and not harsh.

    regarding the MG Radical it wasn't MY racquet so not gonna force my opinion. youth need to experience and learn...
     
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  47. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    Wise words bad call.
     
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  48. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    :) thanks.
     
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  49. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    Anyway,

    The big conclusion for me is that the C10 really seems to be a nice racquet I could get used to over time. Whether I will start using it as my main stick or not will depend on the possibilities my game has with it. For now I would say that I feel it makes my game more varied and more all round that other racquets, so I might just go with it.
     
    #49
  50. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    On a side note, when I look at the C10 pro and its beam I somehow recall the time I briefly demoed an nBlade, I think Wilson did a little bit of industrial espionnage here and then called it inverted loop technology or something like that. BTW the nBlade was also highly flexible. It was supposed to be a copy of the Head Radicals but for me it had a different feel. Thinking about it now in retrospect I would say it felt like a lighter 18 X 20 C10 pro. Actually that should bring it close to a C9 classic, according to what I have read in this forum but I have never hit with a C9.
     
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