*****Can a Sciatic Nerve Pain Go Away With Rest?*****

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by superlobber, Feb 22, 2009.

  1. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    I had a back pain a week ago and give it a 4 days rest. After the 4 days, I start to play tennis again. I feel some numbness in my leg, but thought that it from a 4 days rest. A few days later after a good tennis day, my leg begin to go from numb to pain. The pain is from my right buttock to the back of my right knee. I had a back surgery before due to same symtom and knew what it was right away when the pain began.
    The pain is there, but it's not that bad. I can still walk, sit, and sleep, but quite nervous about playing tennis. I'm affraid that (playing tennis or not) will cause another surgery - something I cannot afford right now during this tough economic time.
    Can this pain goes away without surgery? If so, what I can I do? Please give me some advise.
     
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  2. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    Hard to tell.

    If pain is bearable, your sciatica isn't severe, and perhaps it could go away with time.

    For my sciatica, I went to a chiropractor and got ART (active release technique) and deep-tissue massage done. It helped tremendously and got rid of about 70% of pain (the therapy lasted a half year and then hit a plateau in improvement). Time healed the rest (although I still feel some negligible lingering pain from time to time).

    Go talk to your doctor and see what sort of treatments are right for you.
     
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  3. princemidplus

    princemidplus Rookie

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    depending on whether the problem is in your buttock or in the spine itself will determine the treatment needed. if it is the muscles in your buttock see a physiotherapist who should be able to loosen them in about a fortnight. if it the spine you will need to have more extensive investigations and i cannot tell you the prognosis unless i see you myself.
     
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  4. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    My Sciatic nerve is bothering me, but nothing severe. I can still walk, sit, sleep and even play tennis, but it's defintely bothering me. What really concern me is that it mays get worse and might lead to a surgery. This symptom has gotten severe before about 10 yrs ago and I can barely walk. It was unbareable and my legs was getting smaller and smaller. My last resort was getting surgery, then it was like a miracle. At least 70-80% of the pain was gone. For the next 4-5 yrs, I have to play tennis and basketball with a back support. I have eventually grow out of that back support due to weight . For the last year or so, I have been playing without the back support and my game improve significantly. I have been trying to buy the same back support, but can't find the same one.
    However, I have do some stretching this morning and it seem to improve a little bit.
    If you guys have any other ideas, please help me out.
    Thanks.
     
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  5. jessey

    jessey Rookie

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    Just be very careful in general. Tennis is not as important as your health.
     
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  6. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    Why surgery? The symptoms you described can be perfectly fixed with certain exercises.
    Lie flat on the floor, try to raise your upper body, first on your elbows - when you become better - on your arms. This is called McKenzie technique. Look it up on the net.
    Be very careful of course. Look it up on the net to understand the concept behind it and how properly to do it.
    This routine will align your back, release your sciatic nerve. You will notice that pain will centrelise first, then disappear. After that you will have to do routine of streching and strengthening exercises - look up on the net, or talk to Sport Physician, not a surgeon or regular doctors. These guys will want to cut you up.
    You don't need surgery, and...you never did!
     
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  7. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    I just had a match today and it felt .... okay.
    For over a week, I was thinking about giving up all my match for the rest of the season and just rest until I get better. Instead, I have been stretching out everyday and have my back massage almost everyday ang it felt great. Of course that it didn't the same before the pain happen, but at least I still able to play and win.
    Thank you all for helping me out.
    Anymore advise will also help, as the pain is still there.
     
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  8. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

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    I would not be playing tennis if I were you. I would take a break from tennis for 1 month, or until you have absolutely no pain and have full flexibility. You could be out of action for 6-12 months if you ignore this and continue playing tennis.

    The biggest culprit for back pain is the kick serve.. you may have to change your mechanics on it, to put less stress on the back.

    I had sciatia 6 years back from doing yard work. I could not sit, stand, or sleep! my right thigh, calf, and foot hurt like hell for 3 weeks. The pain subsided in 5 weeks. It took 3 years for the pain in my calf to go away. UCLA medical center recommended surgery but I decided on 1 years rest instead.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2009
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  9. bigfoot910

    bigfoot910 Rookie

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    OP: Does the pain end up in your calf as well? I am just wondering if there is a pain that skips the knee and goes down, or if it hurts the entire back of the leg... There are different diagnosis for this.

    You can't say that... There are cases for everything, So unless you are his physician and have reviewed his medical files and all the findings associated... I would not be offering matter of fact statements like that. McKenzie's are a treatment that COULD be effective, but the OP needs to make sure that the Diagnosis is correct first.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2009
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  10. Japanese Maple

    Japanese Maple Semi-Pro

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    Tennisdad65-from time to time, about 1x every 2-3 years my back locks up on the lower left side and goes away in 4-5 days-usually brought on by too much working out and not enough stretching. Question: could this be a "slipped disk" or just a muscle strain that goes into spasm because I get no pain in the buttocks or down my leg, just in the back.

    From what I have read about "herniated/slipped disks" is that it usually shoots pain down your butt and leg, besides in the back. Can you have a "slipped disk" without radiate butt,thigh,calve, pain?
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2009
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  11. bigfoot910

    bigfoot910 Rookie

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    Slipped disk and herniated disk are the same thing (just patient's lingo vs Dr.'s term)... It is possible to have a disk herniation without much pain. HOWEVER, it is UNLIKELY.
    Muscle spasms that are severe enough also have the ability to radiate down into the legs...
    It would be wise to have it looked at by a Dr. (I would recommend a Chiropractor as they are highly qualified to diagnose and treat problems of this nature.)
     
    #11
  12. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    I have noticed that OP has too much fixation on surgery thing, where it's really a last resort and there are plenty of better alternatives.
    Strong statements like that might bring his attention to it. And I am sure OP's quite capable to filter out what is best for him.
     
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  13. junbumkim

    junbumkim Professional

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    Although I am a little uncertain, I also have a case of sciatica.

    My left lower back stiffens up and becomes painful, and the pain often shoots down to my left thigh. It is significantly worse when i play high impact sports like tennis or running.

    I think mine is less sever than yours.

    For me, back exercises that I found online helped tremendously. I started doing them during the summer, and just doing them would eliminate the pain instantly.although the stiffness would come back after running or playing tennis.

    I really worked hard on increasing flexibility in my hip areas, lower back, hamstrings and so on. Ironically, practicing some of the side kicks or spin kicks helped my sciatica a lot.

    I also worked hard to build strength around my core.Swimming also has helped, I think. I take one of those board and do a few labs (4) with just kicking.

    So, from my experience, the rest alone won't be enough treatment for your sciatica. You need to take an active measure to deal with it.
     
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  14. tennisdad65

    tennisdad65 Hall of Fame

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    your's could be a muscle strain in the back only.

    you can get a herniated disk but may never feel the pain in your limbs if the extrusion does not hit the nerve. if it hits the nerve, you will know it :). The more back strains you get, the more chances that a herniated disk will occur.

    In tennis, I think the most possible cause of herniated disks is the kick serve.. or if you arch your back during any serve. better to bend those knees and turn the shoulder to get your power.

    I recollect that my extrusion was 9 mm . the doc said it would take a year or more to smoothen out and stop exerting pressure on the nerve.
     
    #14
  15. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    In my case, it's definitely a herniated disks. I got this about ten years ago, but didn't know what to do with it. I have rested for over a year, but it doesn't help. The pain got worst and worst - I can't sit, stand, walk, and sleep without the severe pain. My last resort was surgery.

    This time, it's not servere. I can still walk, sit and sleep. With the proper research and you guys' help, I have been doing a lot stretch and massage - the pain got less and less. I just have to live along with and know my limit.

    Stretching my lower back, strengthing my abs and core, and proper diet really help.

    As for the kick serve, now that you guys mentioned it. As my kick serve got better (but still suck), my back got worst and worst.
     
    #15
  16. Japanese Maple

    Japanese Maple Semi-Pro

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    Happy to report that my back feels significantly better after applying ultrasound(have my own unit), heating pad and doing various stretches 2/day, along with taking a prescription NSAID. The stretches have really helped a lot and in the future I will pay more attention to stretching my back to prevent a recurrence. Also, I will eliminate doing triple jump rope jumps as part of my speed /plyometric workouts-way too much force on my spine/back and the main reason I strained my back in the first place!
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2009
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  17. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    For Months, my sciatica was gone. I was so happay... for 1 1/2 months. I went out and 8 out of 9 day, then the pain back again. This pain is back again.
    Any more advise... off course that I will no do anything that stupid again.
     
    #17
  18. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    Try stretch the piriformis muscle, that might help.


    GO SEE YOUR DOCTOR.
     
    #18
  19. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    I have sciatica from a herniated disc from a bike accident. Here's what helped me:

    1. Rest;
    2. Meloxicam;
    3. Meloxicam;
    4. Meloxicam;
    5. Meloxicam;
    6. Squats, and assorted core training for two months 4 days a week;
    7. The stretching exercises mentioned above, including McKenzie.
    8. Meloxicam;
    9. Meloxicam;
    10. Meloxicam.

    My doctor told me to keep playing tennis, do the exercises and take the meds. He said it will either get worse, get better, or stay the same. :) Mine does all three, depending on the day. :)

    -Robert
     
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  20. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    Stretching the piriformis muscle is too painful. Stretching it felt like I have just played a 5 seters.
    Perhap I will try it again when the pain is gone.
     
    #20
  21. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Apply some ice to your lower back. You probably have an inflammed nerve and it'll eventually get better, but you absolutely need to rest it. Keep applying ice to the low back area for now.
     
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  22. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    bad idea... you should apply moist heat. also, the sciatic is not in the lower back so either advice will really offer no good.
     
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  23. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Heat? Heat? Cut the ********, dicer. I'm putting my foot down now because you've gone too far. I will not tolerate advice from you that puts a poster's back on the line. Do not listen to dicer. If you apply heat, your back will get much worse. Apply ice to the area where you feel pain.
     
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  24. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    Excellent. You can take your foot out of your mouth first, right? Nerve injuries of any sort require blood flow. Vasoconstriction caused by icing will not only be detrimental, but painful too.

    The sciatic nerve is not located in your back., enough said.

    You really shouldn't be handing out armchair mediacl/theraputic advice.
     
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  25. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Hey, genius, the sciatic nerve starts at the spine before it shoots down the leg. Take that heat advice and give it to someone you'd like to injure. If you want to stay injury free, don't apply heat to your already injured back. Dicer, did you forget that more posters listen to me than to you? You give anecdotal advice and you won't be satisfied until someone gets injured. People like you give nurses a bad name.
     
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  26. ir0-ed

    ir0-ed Rookie

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    #26
  27. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest


    Clown, don't you have a circus to be at or a village to run through.

    This is awesome, thanks again, Ricky.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 15, 2009
    #27
  28. DANMAN

    DANMAN Professional

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    Pain from Sciatica very commonly begins in the lower back and shoots down the dorsal aspect of the leg since the nerve roots that make up the sciatic nerve include both lumbar and sacral nerves. Icing reduces swelling thereby reducing pain. Heat will indeed increase bloodflow, but will also caused increase release of pain mediators. Heat will temporarily make it feel better but will have zero healing effect long term.
     
    #28
  29. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Dan the Man certainly knows more than the alleged nurse, dicer. You tell that fool, dicer, what's up, danman.
     
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  30. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    If anything, the exact opposite of what you just said... moist heat may cause inital discomfort, but the long-term healing effect is positive.

    I regrettfully inform you, you are wrong. I know what sciatica is, and the sciatic nerve is buried below the low back. You can ice all you want...

    Ice will heal sciatic nerve disorders... good stuff. *sarcasm*

    Heat is the remedy... increased blood flow will stimulate healing, not ice. Intermittant heat, ice, heat will also do some good. :)
     
    #30
  31. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    as an ex-fitness trainer, an ex-nutritionist, and an ex-mma guy sounds like you really know your stuff. :-|
     
    #31
  32. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    You mean more than you? Yes I do. And where do you get mma?
     
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  33. DANMAN

    DANMAN Professional

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    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sciatica/DS00516

    Maybe you can argue with the Mayo Clinic. They do say to use heat, but what do they say to use to reduce inflammation and swelling for the first several days several times a day.

    "Pain that radiates from your lower (lumbar) spine to your buttock and down the back of your leg is the hallmark of sciatica. You may feel the discomfort almost anywhere along the nerve pathway, but it's especially likely to follow a path from your low back to your buttock and the back of your thigh and calf.

    The pain can vary widely, from a mild ache to a sharp, burning sensation or excruciating discomfort. Sometimes it may feel like a jolt or electric shock. It may be worse when you cough or sneeze, and prolonged sitting also can aggravate symptoms. Usually only one lower extremity is affected.

    ...

    For most people, sciatica responds well to self-care measures. You'll heal more quickly if you continue with your usual activities, but avoid what may have triggered the pain in the first place. Although resting for a day or so may provide some relief, prolonged bed rest isn't a good idea. In the long run, inactivity will make your signs and symptoms worse.

    In addition to resuming usual activities, try the following measures:

    Cold packs. Initially, using cold packs may be able to reduce inflammation and relieve discomfort. Wrap an ice pack or a package of frozen peas in a clean towel and apply to the painful areas for 15 to 20 minutes at least several times a day.
    Hot packs. After 48 hours, apply heat to the areas that hurt. Use warm packs, a heat lamp or a heating pad on the lowest setting. If you continue to have pain, try alternating warm and cold packs.
    Stretching. Stretching exercises for your low back can help you feel better and may help relieve nerve root compression. Avoid jerking, bouncing or twisting during the stretch and try to hold the stretch at least 30 seconds.
    Over-the-counter medications. Pain relievers (analgesics) fall into two categories — those that reduce pain and inflammation and those that only treat pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen, and acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) can both be helpful for sciatica.

    Although they can provide real relief, both types of medication have a "ceiling effect" — that is, there's a limit to how much pain they can control. If you have moderate to severe pain, exceeding the recommended dosage won't provide additional benefits. What's more, NSAIDs can cause side effects such as nausea, stomach bleeding or ulcers, and acetaminophen can cause liver problems if taken in excess.

    If you use these medications, talk to your doctor so that you can be monitored for problems. In addition, periodically re-evaluate whether you still need them. Exercise, stretching, massage and other nondrug treatments can often provide the same benefits without side effects.

    Regular exercise. It may seem counterintuitive to exercise when you're in pain, but regular exercise is one of the best ways to combat chronic discomfort. Exercise prompts your body to release endorphins — chemicals that prevent pain signals from reaching your brain.

    Early in the course of sciatica, water exercise or other low-impact exercise such as a stationary bicycle will help you stay active without worsening your symptoms. Later, as you improve and the pain lessens, combining aerobic activity with strength training and core stability exercises that improve the strength of your back muscles can help limit the effects of age-related degenerative changes in your back.

    If you're new to exercise, start out slowly and progress to at least 30 minutes most days. To prevent injury, consider learning proper weightlifting techniques from a certified personal trainer, fitness specialist or physical therapist."
     
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  34. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    like I said... heat. the Mayo clinic is a suggestion to maybe use ice packs for up to 48 hours. as they go on to say first heat... then heat. thankyou Danmad.
     
    #34
  35. JSE

    JSE Rookie

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    Dice, you da man! You are truly a downward spiralling trainwreck within these forums and can't seem to get out of your own way to prevent it.
     
    #35
  36. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    yes... thankyou, and I am sure your overweight butt is running bleachers for 45 min's a day... stop hating just because you are a loser and can't be like me.
     
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  37. JSE

    JSE Rookie

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    Dude, I have seen your photos. I don't want to be like you.
     
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  38. JSE

    JSE Rookie

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    Bye the way, I run this stadium 2 to 3 times almost daily. Up and down each vertical aisle, all the way around, 2 to 3 times. 2 laps for 30 minutes or 3 laps for 45 minutes.

    http://www.westsidetennisandfitness.com/tennis/events/
     
    #38
  39. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    At least I have the stones to post my photos in a thread... you remain a fat-ass and lie about running 45 min bleachers everyday, then yell at people who actually succeed goals that you could only fail at. Have a nice day.
     
    #39
  40. JSE

    JSE Rookie

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    I have always commended you on trying to lose weight. I just disagreed with the method. And for the record, when did you succeed in your goal? You did not lose the weight you intended. In the end, things have turned out just like myself and several others told you they would. You dropped weight too fast and you have now put some of it back on just as quickly. Oh that's right, it's muscle weight. :confused: :)

    Also, why do you assume I am lying about running bleachers? It's not that hard. And where have I failed? Please tell me. I would be very interested to know which of my fitness goals I have not achieved. Enlighten me!

    Have you now resorted to just calling people names and liars wherever they disagree with you?

    Class act there.
     
    #40
  41. DANMAN

    DANMAN Professional

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    It says nothing about heat reducing inflammation or promoting healing. It is common knowlede that heat reduces stiffness and muscle guarding around injured areas. It also says to use cold again when there is still pain. You are trying to argue semantics. You can never hurt your body using ice...heat on the other hand...
     
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  42. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    My sciatic pain seem to feel much better in the morning then it felt at night. I have little or less problem playing tennis in the morning comparing to playing at night. Massage and heat pad (salonpas) worked great for me. I will try cold cold pad to see how it feel.
    Thank you guys.
     
    #42
  43. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Whatever you do, don't listen to dicer. That ignorant dicer doesn't know what he's saying and he'd rather see you get hurt than to heal properly just to win an argument in his own mind. Go with the ice packs and stay away from heat for now. Heat is for pre-activity and ice is for healing and post activity.
     
    #43
  44. junbumkim

    junbumkim Professional

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    I am just curious, does anyone really know why inflammation happens, and why you need to apply ice? or

    do people just take it for granted as a common knowledge that you apply ice to an injured area?
     
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  45. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    During a match, my leg got extremely stiff due to my sciatic nerve, by stretching the pirifromis muscle give me an instant relief for a few minutes.
    Thanks.
     
    #45
  46. mtommer

    mtommer Hall of Fame

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    Do you sit a lot at work? Back in January I ruptured a disk. It wasn't until about three weeks ago that the Sciatic pain became tolerable. I was taking NSAID's every four hours. Now I can go seven or eight hours between dosages. I still feel it, even as I type, but the intensity of the pain has become tolerable at least. I have one of those Original McKenzie Lumbar support cushions and that has helped me tremendously at work where I sit for long periods of time. Sitting always exacerbated the pain so that at the end of the day I was ready to chew anybody's head off. For the first time two days ago I was able to ride my bicycle for longer than two hours. Tennis has helped me tremendously during my recovery although I have been taking it easy while playing.
     
    #46
  47. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    I have found out the sitting down on a chair for a long time at work can cause sciatic pain, but sitting in the restroom for a long time can really make it worse. It may sound funny, but it's the true. Don't sit on the toilet seat for a long period (more than 15 minutes), or it can cause a great case of sciatica. I'm not trying to be funny, just be honest and helpful.
     
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  48. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Thanks for the observation and update.
    A toilet seat is almost always lower than an office chair, so sitting in this very low position will strain the sciatic nerve more.
    I hope you are a lot better than your last post in June.
     
    #48
  49. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    I've stopped taking Meloxicam for my back because I have asthma. This summer I had 5 matches where I was struggling to breathe and my doctor wisely pulled me off Cox 2 inhibitors. Meloxicam can induce anaphylaxis in asthmatics. The response was mild in my case. I also had a slight rash....

    I'm going to keep doing the back exercises and rest when it gets too bad. At least until one of the overpaid drug companies comes out with something that doesn't kill me. ;)

    -Robert
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2009
    #49
  50. superlobber

    superlobber New User

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    taking painkillers is not a solution. Its will only make it worse because it'll make you fell great, when problem is still there. You 'll carryout your normal activities, then make it worse. When the drug wear out, the pain will only gets worse.
     
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